Open Educational Resources (OER)

Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning and research materials in any medium – digital or otherwise – that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation and redistribution by others with no or limited restrictions.

Development of a Draft Recommendation on OER

Further to the adoption of Resolution 44 ‘Desirability of a standard-setting instrument on international collaboration in the field of Open Educational Resources (OER)’ at the 39th Session of the UNESCO General Conference, UNESCO is developing a draft text for a UNESCO Normative Instrument (Recommendation) on OER that will be discussed at the 40th session of the UNESCO General Conference in 2019.

 

Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning and research materials in any medium – digital or otherwise – that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation and redistribution by others with no or limited restrictions.
OERs help improve education across the globe. They are important for developing countries, where many students may not be able to afford textbooks, where access to classrooms may be limited, and where teacher-training programs may be lacking. They are also important in wealthy industrialized countries, where they can offer significant cost savings.

For Students

OERs offer free access to some of the world’s best courses and even degree programs. They can also offer huge cost savings as alternatives to expensive textbooks.

For teachers, ministries of education and governments

OERs provide free and legal access to some of the world’s best courses. Educators can then adapt them to local languages and cultures and use them as a basis for innovation

For people of all ages and backgrounds

You don’t have to be a teacher or a student to understand the importance of OERs. Free information is a fundamental human right, and OERs make it possible for people of all ages and backgrounds to learn more about the world around them and access the tools they need to improve their lives and livelihoods.

The 2nd World Open Educational Resources (OER) Congress took place from 18 to 20 September 2017 in Ljubljana, Slovenia, organized by UNESCO and the Government of Slovenia/Ministry of Education, Science and Sport, with the generous support of the Government of Slovenia.

The objectives of the 2nd World OER Congress were to:

  • examine solutions to meet the challenges of mainstreaming OER content and practices into education systems worldwide;
  • showcase the world’s best practices in OER policies, initiatives and experts, and;
  • identify recommendations that are demonstrably best practices for the mainstreaming of OER.

The Congress marks the fifteenth anniversary since the term OER was first coined at a UNESCO meeting, and the fifth anniversary of the 2012 Paris OER Declaration that provided an internationally recognized strategy for OER actions.

The 2nd World OER Congress brought together Ministers of Education and Higher Education, decision-makers responsible for human resources development, senior policy makers, expert practitioners, researchers and relevant stakeholders. Some 500 participants attended the event from over 100 UNESCO Member States, including Ministers from Bangladesh, Barbados, Bulgaria, Costa Rica, Croatia, Kiribati, Lithuania, Malta, former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Mauritius, Mauritania, Slovenia, South Africa and the United Arab Emirates.

The 2nd World OER Congress resulted in the “Ljubljana OER Action Plan”1 and the 2ndWorld OER Congress Ministerial Statement2 which were both adopted by consensus.
The Ljubljana OER Action Plan provides recommendations to stakeholders in five strategic areas: building the capacity of users to find, re-use, create and share OER; language and cultural issues; ensuring inclusive and equitable access to quality OER; developing sustainability models; and developing supportive policy environments.

The stakeholders, identified in this Action Plan: educators, teacher trainers, librarians, learners, parents, educational policy makers at both the governmental and institutional level, teacher and other.

The 2012 Paris OER Declaration was formally adopted at the 2012 World Open Educational Resources (OER) Congress held at the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris from 20 – 22 June 2012.

The Declaration marks a historic moment in the growing movement for Open Educational Resources and calls on governments worldwide to openly license publicly funded educational materials for public use.
Non Official Translations of the 2012 Paris OER Declaration :