Inequalities in the time of COVID-19

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chokri Kooli's picture
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Chokri Kooli is visiting Assistant Professor at The Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa Canada. He earned a Doctorate (PhD) in Economics from the school for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS). He also earned two Master degrees in Organizations Management and social sciences from the University of Paris. He performs research in Public policy, Economics of development, Economics of education, Labor, gender and Health Economics.
Jordan Panayotov's picture
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Jordan Panayotov is Founder and Director of The Independent Centre for Analysis & Research of Economies (ICARE), Melbourne, Australia. With background in Economics he gained MPH (Health Economics) at The University of Melbourne, which inspired him to focus his work on Health Equity as an important premise for achieving Sustainable Population Health and Wellbeing (SPH) which he suggested as the ultimate indicator for Sustainable Development. In a project for IUHPE in 2013 Jordan initiated, developed and managed “Health in All Policies: Why doing it and How to make it work?”. He pointed out that policies have differential impacts (direct or indirect) on health of populations, which, if not properly assessed and considered in policy design and implementation, can lead to growing health inequalities, thus impede sustainable development. Jordan argues that, since Exclusion inevitably impacts negatively one’s health and wellbeing, inclusive policies should be a normative goal, HiAP is the right approach for operationalizing such policies and SPH is the ultimate indicator for inclusive policy design and implementation in all sectors.
Monica Narvaez's picture
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Mónica Andrea Narváez Chicaíza has received her LLM degree from McGill University. She is a lawyer from the Universidad de Nariño, Colombia, and hold a degree in Social Security from the Universidad Externado de Colombia. Her main interest lies in the public policies in health as a mean to achieve well-living in the population. She is also interested in development law, especially in the achievement of sustainable development goals.
Sayantan Ghosal's picture
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Sayantan Ghosal is Professor of Economics at the Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow. He was previously Dean of Interdisciplinarity and Impact at the College of Social Sciences at the University of Glasgow, a Professor of Economics at the University of Warwick from 2004 to 2013 where he was also Research Director of the ESRC funded Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE). He also has a PhD from CORE, Universite Catholique de Louvain under the European Doctoral Program in Quantitative Economics. Sayantan Ghosal co-ordinates the interdisciplinary network “Behavior, Structure and Interventions”at the University of Glasgow and is an academic ambassador for the research beacon “Addressing Inequalities”. He is a member of the Strategic Advisory Network for the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). He is a PI on a number of research grants and a co-investigator on the ESRC funded “Rebuilding Macroeconomics Network”. Over his career he has been awarded over £8 million in research funding. and an external Research Fellow for ESRC Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE). He has supervised over 25 PhD students. His research interests include poverty and deprivation traps, behavioral welfare economics, sovereign debt crisis and restructuring, endogenous formation of networks and groups, political economy; global cooperation for climate change, long run growth and foundations of general equilibrium. He has published in journals such Economic Journal, Journal of Development Economics, Journal of Economic Theory, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Economic History, Frontiers of Neuroscience, Games and Economic Behavior, , Economic Theory and Journal of Mathematical Economics and includes a ISI highly cited paper. He has authored/co-authored a number of policy reports (e.g. Chatham House), blogs (e.g. Vox EU, Ideas for India, The Conversation), newspaper articles (e.g. The Times of India and The Guardian) and presented research/evidence at the House of Commons and the Scottish Parliament. His research has been cited and discussed in the World Development Report 2015, the New York Times, The Times, The Guardian, The Handbook of Behavioral Economics (in the Chapter on "Behavioral Development Economics" by Kremer, Michael, Gautam Rao, and Frank Schilbach) and the presidential address to the European Economic Association by Eliana le Ferrara.
Mehdi Shiva's picture
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Mehdi is an Economist at the Government Outcomes Lab. His work involves enhancing the economic research in social policy by promoting robust economic evaluation methods such as cost-effectiveness and decision analysis. He also works on value for money analysis, pricing, and impact measurement. Prior to joining the GO Lab team, he worked as a post-doc research fellow in health economics. Other experience includes directing a research programme of an entrepreneurial company, Happening Technologies, in collaboration with the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology, which familiarised him with designing research projects and building research capabilities in coalition with the public sector. He also has ample teaching experience and has worked with UNDP as well as a number of consultancy firms in the past.
Dr. Rachel Hale's picture
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I am a sociologist interested in the transformations of healthcare, particularly through the introduction of new health technologies or extending existing technologies to new patient groups. I conduct qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research. My research has looked at the social and ethical issues around genomic medicine (including genetic testing and screening and genome editing), synthetic biology (including cultured blood and induced pluripotent stem cell therapy), and (pandemic and seasonal) influenza vaccines and HPV vaccines.
Marie Claire Van Hout's picture
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Professor of Public Health Policy and Practice
Miro Griffiths's picture
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I am an activist, teacher, and researcher on disabled people's oppression within society. I am particularly interested in the political and economic structures that perpetuate disabled people's marginalisation. I work with a number of non-governmental organisations across the UK and mainland Europe, government departments, universities, and human rights institutions. My research focuses on the role of activism and social movements in developing a safe, fair, and inclusive society. I am also interested in political sociology, processes of social policy development and implementation, and notions of ableism. If I can be of any assistance to your work then please contact me. You can find me through various social media platforms and Google searches.
Gilbert Achcar's picture
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Gilbert Achcar is Professor of development studies and international relations at the SOAS, University of London. His many books include: The Clash of Barbarisms: The Making of the New World Disorder (2002, 2006); Perilous Power: The Middle East and U.S. Foreign Policy, co-authored with Noam Chomsky (2007, 2008); The Arabs and the Holocaust: The Arab-Israeli War of Narratives (2010); The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising (2013); and Morbid Symptoms: Relapse in the Arab Uprising (2016).
Esther Miedema's picture
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I am a lecturer in the Governance and Inclusive Development (GID) research programme of the Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research (AISSR) at the University of Amsterdam. My teaching and research are in the field of education, gender, sexuality and international development. My research examines on a range of topics linked to young people, health and gender-based violence. I am interested a) in the genealogy of, and interactions between, global, national and local narratives about education, young people and health within SRHR-related education, and b) the ways in which young women and men contest and subvert gendered norms and violence, and inequalities more broadly.

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