Put carbon dividend at the core of post-COVID reboot

Join

Put carbon dividend at the core of post-COVID reboot

Welcome to our expert series on the post-COVID reset. That is, a reset along a more inclusive path. The series introduces listeners to leading thinkers as they debate concrete policy options for such a recovery and take stock of the data that could (and should) inform these policy shifts. 
 
This is a three-part podcast to connect the dots between carbon tax, carbon dividend, and universal basic income (UBI). It discusses emerging ideas and asks how we should be equity-weighting green policies in this recovery.
 
Our expert is Anders Fremstad, Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Colorado State University. 

  

The host is John Crowley, UNESCO's Chief of Research, Policy and Foresight. 

  

Part 1: Carbon price-and-dividend 

 

Green transition and environmental justice are central to inclusive post-COVID reset. Key green policies, however, raise equity and distributional concerns. Part 1 debates:

  • Carbon tax and, importantly, its possible regressive aspects.
  • Ways to equity-weight carbon tax and the role of carbon dividends.
  • Use of carbon revenues – what they could be invested into and why.

 

PART 1: Carbon price-and-dividend

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Carbon dividend as UBI 

 

Interest in UBI is on the rise. Carbon dividends are debated as an option of financing such schemes. Part 2 digs deeper into:

  • If/why carbon dividends can be used as UBI.
  • Key pitfalls of solely relying on carbon dividends to fund substantive and sustained UBI.
  • Ideas for hybrid financing of UBI – carbon dividends and beyond.

 

PART 2: Carbon dividend as UBI

 

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Knowledge and policy
 

This final part talks to knowledge and policy actors, discussing:

  • Knowledge gaps and issues that need to be addressed on the research side.
  • Emerging ideas and data that deserve closer attention in policy debates on carbon price-and-dividend and inclusive recovery.

 

PART 3: Knowledge and policy

 

 

 

 

 

Takeaways

  • Distributional aspects of carbon pricing require careful calibration, with carbon price-and-dividend being a solution.
  • Carbon dividends can act as a green basic income, although they are bound to decrease throughout the energy transition and may be insufficient for substantial schemes.
  • Data indicates public support of carbon pricing when carbon dividends are in place, but much more is needed to understand levers to building and firming up that buy-in in real life.
  • Policy messaging needs to be aligned when speaking to the people in their capacity as consumers, as citizens, and as workers.

 

 

Have you read?  
  Basic Income – think data then policy
  Greening the Basic Income​
  Gender inequality in times of COVID-19 – give women cash
  Minimum subsistence income, the Spanish way

 

Listen for more  
  Basic Income – deciphering the promises and the data​
  Close social protection gaps to reset equitably after COVID-19 
  Universal Basic Income and beyond - what are our options for recovery

 

On the go? Listen and subscribe here:

 

Also on: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Anchor.fm | Radio Public  

 

....

 

Anders Fremstad is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Colorado State University. His expertise is in the political economy of the environment, especially the sharing economy and the climate crisis. Anders has written on the distributional impact of carbon pricing policies, carbon dividends, and the connections between the latter with UBI. 

  

John Crowley is UNESCO‘s former chief of research, policy, and foresight. He is the author of five books and a further 100 academic articles and book chapters, mainly on political theory and comparative politics.

 

The facts, ideas and opinions expressed in this piece are those of the authors; they are not necessarily those of UNESCO or any of its partners and stakeholders and do not commit nor imply any responsibility thereof. The designations employed and the presentation of material throughout this piece do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of UNESCO concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. 

 

 

Join