Selection criteria for UNESCO Prize for Girls’ and Women’s Education

The laureates of the Prize are selected on the basis of recommendations made by an independent International Jury. The project/programme of the nominee will be assessed by the Jury based on these selection criteria.


The project/programme’s impact should be qualitatively and/or quantitatively measureable, and deliver tangible results relative to the invested resources. This can include demonstrable changes in: (1) attitudes, beliefs and practices toward gender equality; (2) girls’ educational participation, attendance, completion and learning outcomes; and/or (3) other relevant parameters to advance girls’ and women’s education.


The project/programme is stimulating, and/or drawing on, innovative practices advancing girls’ and women’s education. This includes new ways of working and transformative “out-of-the-box” thinking and actions. The project/programme can demonstrate innovation in terms of: (1) the themes covered; (2) the methodology employed; (3) the channels used to create change for girls and women; and/or (4) other aspects.


The project/programme has taken steps, ideally from its design or implementation phases, to ensure it will have a lasting impact beyond the project lifecycle. This may include efforts to ensure the: (1) continuation of local action; (2) institutionalization of project components; and (3) generation of further initiatives.

Additional criteria

The project/programme should already be running for at least 2 years and show evidence that it may be replicable, scalable and/or provide significant learning potential for initiatives in other contexts. It should also contribute to one or more of the 5 Priority Action Areas of the Prize.

  1. Basic education: support girls/adolescent girls to transition from primary education to lower-secondary education and completion of a full basic education
  2. Literacy: support adolescent girls and young women to acquire literacy skills
  3. Learning environments: support the creation of a gender-responsive and safe teaching-learning environment, free of school-related gender-based violence
  4. Teachers: engage female and male teachers to develop gender-responsive teaching attitudes and practices and be change agents
  5. World of work: support adolescent girls and young women to acquire knowledge and skills to adequately transition from school to work and lead a fulfilling life