Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Images in Action - Break down stereotypes!

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

Quite a lot of people have prejudices about inclusion groups. This takes away the opportunities of the young people without even giving them a chance. SALTO-YOUTH hopes this booklet inspires youth workers accross Europe to create greater acceptance of people who are different, to build a better image for them amongst the general public. Combating these negative images is part of youth and inclusion work. This booklet aims to give youth workers practical tools and tips to improve the image of their target group. This way, they create greater acceptance of the young people in question, which will contribute to their inclusion in society.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

It provides a great diversity of ideas in order to break down stereotypes and to deconstruct prejudice. It enables to tackle how images, stereotypes and prejudice function, where they come from and how to influence them in a positive way; how to plan an image-building campaign; how to involve the young people from your organisation in your image-building campaign...

Courses / trainings
Intercultural competences: a diversity of challenges for networks of trainers

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

The Swiss national organisation of the Society for Intercultural Education, Training And Research (SIETAR). SIETAR Switzerland manages a community of over a hundred corporate and individual members including universities, NGOs, intercultural trainers, coaches and academics. Each member has a specific expertise to provide tailored trainings in a variety of contexts / challenges, where specific knowledge of cultural codes and intercultural competences are key for successful outcomes. 

What is this good practice about ?

SIETAR Switzerland organizes a regular program of training sessions, webinars and conferences, tackling a great diversity of topics where intercultural dialogue is central. From a discussion focused on the management of religious diversity at work to the presentation of innovative tools to update a practitioner’s set of methodologies, this page of events provides both experts and the general public a great source of capacity-building activities as well as a dynamic hub of knowledge exchange.

How does this stakeholder contribute to intercultural dialogue?

SIETAR Switzerland equips a variety of audiences with intercultural competences. Some examples: collaborating with managers to develop their cultural intelligence and help them better manage cultural diversity in the workplace; working with professionals who conduct mentorship programs with refugees, to facilitate a mutual engagement; embedding intercultural competences in students to prepare them for global professional roles and to be responsible global citizens; preparing individuals for a diplomatic career or in international co-operation

Courses / trainings
Empowerment of young ethnic minority women while respecting their cultural background

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

Empowerment means ensuring that individuals have the capacity and opportunity to equip themselves with the skills and knowledge necessary to make informed life choices. With this in mind this resource is designed to help create a greater understanding of the theory and practice of empowering young ethnic minority women and to enable the reader to share that knowledge and understanding with those who would question its benefits and potential.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

Empowerment is a concept that cannot be imposed, no matter how fair and universal we believe it is. When it comes to ethnic minority women, there are very specific cultural, identity, traditions, codes to be aware of, in order to manage to engage with them efficiently. This resources gives away keys to open doors, that are more subtle to open than one may think.

Courses / trainings
Building Bridges in Conflict Areas

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities to support organisations and National Agencies (NAs) within the frame of the European Commission's Erasmus+ Youth programme and beyond.

What is this good practice about ?

Conflicts, clashes, fights, and misunderstandings all influence young people all around Europe. In this report, you are invited to an overview of the methods, theories, and tools for a better understanding of conflict resolution.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

Throughout this booklet, SALTO-YOUTH raises the following questions: How to encourage young people and create a safe atmosphere for non-formal learning in places, such as suburbs of Paris or towns and villages of so-called disputed territories in South-East Europe (e.g. Kosovo) and in Eastern Europe and Caucasus (e.g. South Ossetia)? How to help young people overcome clashes and intolerance in migrant societies of Spain, Denmark, or Russia? What kind of activities should we undertake to let young people from different sides of conflict interact?

Media
Radio stories of rural women from across the globe

In line with the theme of the 62nd session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (12 – 23 March 2018), “Challenges and opportunities in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of rural women and girls” and in collaboration with the World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC), UN Women brings to life stories of rural women from around the world, from Haiti and Canada to Iraq and Senegal to the pacific islands of Fiji. Produced largely by women producers, these stories, told in the first-person narrative, are currently being aired on local community radio stations. 

Media
Media, radio and the inclusion of Roma people

RadioExpert is a not-for-profit public service organization founded in 2003 to organize and expedite the continuing activities in support of community media worldwide.

Marginalization of the Romani minorities of Central/Eastern Europe remains among the most difficult problems facing Europe today. The search for solutions must include empowerment of Roma people through education and access to media structures. Media literacy and skills training for Roma youth can provide an effective means for media literacy, collaboration, inclusion, access, education employment skills development and social cohesion.

The Roma Youth Media Project is a multi-year initiative to establish and maintain media training programs for Roma youth in Europe. RadioExpert's goals are to establish enabling environments for Roma youth radio in civil societies, and develop sustainable Roma youth radio, TV and film producers and moderators.

Media
Multicultural radio to enact cultural diversity

Australia is one of the world’s most culturally diverse nation, based largely on high levels of immigration in the second part of the 20th century. From the 1970s onwards, Australia formally recognized the massive social changes brought about by postwar immigration, and provided legislation to incorporate cultural diversity into everyday lives. One such ‘legislative’ enactment saw the establishment of multicultural broadcasting in Australia, as arguably a world-first, both in its comprehensiveness and diversity.

Today, Australia has a public sector corporation, the Special Broadcasting Service, administering five radio services in 68 languages. Also, the Community Radio sector produces multicultural programming in 100 languages through a number of its 330 broadcast and 207 narrowcast stations.

This article examines the relationship between radio and its communities. It argues that despite the ‘profile’ of SBS television, radio is much closer to its constituent communities, and therefore plays a greater role in enabling those communities to speak their own histories, beyond the confines of a consensual Anglophile paradigm.

Courses / trainings
Indigenous Studies Portal

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond. This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to nearly 50,000 items.

Projects and Programmes
United in cultural diversity for challenges in common

United Religions Initiatives' Multiregion is home to grassroots interfaith peacebuilding groups around the world who come together virtually to collaborate, learn, and inspire. At the heart of United Religions Initiatives is a global network of locally organized “Cooperation Circles,” or CCs. Each CC is a grassroots, independently organized, self-governing and self-funded group comprised of at least seven members and representing at least 3 different religions, spiritual expressions or indigenous traditions. These Circles work in their own context to build cooperation among people of all faiths and traditions.

Arts
Traditional dances to develop intercultural dialogue

By reconnecting youth to the practice of cultural traditions, no matter what their religion, color or ethnicity is, Indlondlo Zulu Dancers aims to encourage young people to stay away from drugs and criminal activities, while building an intercultural dialogue through dance, among the members of its dance troupe.

The NGO performs, as well as educates, cultural dances in the rural areas of the Valley of 1000 Hills / KwaNyavu / Mkhambathini and surrounding areas (South Africa). The aim really is about providing a positive model for young men from backgrounds lacking male role models, due to the history of a nation where families were torn apart because men often had to live apart from their families.