Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Empowerment of young ethnic minority women while respecting their cultural background

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

Empowerment means ensuring that individuals have the capacity and opportunity to equip themselves with the skills and knowledge necessary to make informed life choices. With this in mind this resource is designed to help create a greater understanding of the theory and practice of empowering young ethnic minority women and to enable the reader to share that knowledge and understanding with those who would question its benefits and potential.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

Empowerment is a concept that cannot be imposed, no matter how fair and universal we believe it is. When it comes to ethnic minority women, there are very specific cultural, identity, traditions, codes to be aware of, in order to manage to engage with them efficiently. This resources gives away keys to open doors, that are more subtle to open than one may think.

Courses / trainings
Value the Difference - A Resource Pack by SALTO-YOUTH

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

There are more than 508 million people in Europe, each one an individual with a different background and life experiences. This resource pack explores the topic of cultural diversity and many of the related and complex issues people in Europe face today, so together we can embrace and celebrate each one of those differences.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

It is designed as a starting point for exploration of cultural diversity by youth workers (or anyone who works with young people). The resource pack contains nine chapters, each offering background information, case studies and practical examples of how to engage young people, in the framework of a diversity of topics: Media, Migration and Cultural Diversity, Asylum Seekers and Refugees, Mediation, Cross Community, Identity, Intercultural Competence...

Publications
Intercultural dialogue to facilitate collaboration around water management

This eBook is one of the outcomes of an interdisciplinary research held at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC Rio), in Brazil, on the intercultural understanding of water issues encountered by the communities living in Rio. It is the result of the cooperation between PUC Rio and the Foundation Cardinal Paul Poupard, which has founded UNESCO Chair on interreligious and intercultural dialogue. This UNESCO Chair is based at the St .Andrews college in Mumbai, and led by Giuseppe Musumeci.

Teams have been working together in order to share experiences and expertise on diverse issues related water that are managed not only with scientific technical competences, but also with a sharp knowledge of the communities’ culture, notably in terms of spiritual beliefs. Indeed, one key observation has been that conflicts related to natural resources among individuals and larger communities cannot be sustainably solved without considering the cultural background of the people.

Check out this eBook to discover how intercultural dialogue supports reconciliation while tackling the global challenge of water scarcity!

Projects and Programmes
Recipes for harmony

Cultural Infusion has created an eBook for primary students to celebrate Australia’s cultural diversity: discover Recipes for harmony!

This resource that includes stories of Australians from a lot of different cultural backgrounds. Developed for the Australian Government Department of Social Services and the Scanlon Foundation to coincide with the 2015 Harmony Day and A Taste of Harmony celebrations, Recipes for Harmony is accompanied by a website with a comprehensive education resource guide with videos, audio and hours of classroom activities.

Discover a unique way to educate students on cultures from across the globe with personal stories, recipes, cultural profiles, language tools and videos !

 

Media
Exploring the complicated world of cultural identity

Join the journey suggested by CBC Radio (Canada), that looks at cultural identity and how Indigenous people see themselves in a world that wants to paint them all with one brush. As you might have guessed, identity is a complicated and touchy issue in a lot of Indigenous communities.

Christi Belcourt's own identity often spills out as paint. The award winning artist is Michif and calls Lac Ste. Anne, Alta., home. She tells the story behind a powerful self-portrait that she created after being told she should not be allowed to apply for funding because she was not Indigenous enough.

Amanda Rheaume is a Métis musician based in Ottawa with a very rich family history. And the more she dug into those stories, the more she was inspired to write about her heritage. 

Oscar Baker III grew up in two very different communities. His mother is Mi'kmaq from Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick. His father is black and his hometown is St. Augustine, Florida. He was surrounded by addiction, violence and poverty. As an angry teenager he drank and looked for trouble on the streets of St. Augustine. Eventually, it would threaten to swallow his life whole. But Oscar saw an opportunity and made a life-changing decision.

Unreserved's own Kim Wheeler shares what it was like to grow up in an adopted family outside of her culture and how she found her way back. She is Mohawk and Anishinabe and was adopted out as part of the ;60s scoop or the Adopt an Indian or Métis Child program. As part of an assimilation policy the federal government took thousands of Indigenous children from their families, often without consent. 

Media
Stories of refugees, by the refugees

'3CR community radio provides a media space enabling progressive communities to voice ideas and build their power to create social change' (statement of purpose, 2016).

Refugee Radio features ten refugees and asylum seekers on their journey to a new land. They share the struggle of leaving family and the familiar behind, of learning a new language yet maintaining their culture, and of needing ways to contribute to Australian society. 

Refugee Radio was part of Human Rights Day 10 December 2010 special programming and is supported by the City of Melbourne and the Victorian Multicultural Commission.

Publications
The role of media to protect cultural identity and diversity

The state creates the conditions, at multiple levels, that guarantee the freedom and quality of the media, the public’s access to it, and diversity of opinion. In Germany, responsibility for media affairs lies principally with the Länder. The Federal Government, however, has legislative powers in specific areas such as telecommunications and copyright. The “Federal Government Report on Media and Communications” (2008) summarizes the Germany’s federal media policy.

Broadcast media, including radio, serve to protect cultural identity as well as diversity and freedom of opinion. The Interstate Broadcasting Agreement of the Länder requires that both private and public broadcasting companies represent diversity through informational, cultural and educational programming. Public broadcasting companies have a particular responsibility for safeguarding cultural identity and cultural memory. Cultural and educational programming is a mainstay of public broadcasters. Statutory rules governing broadcasting and tele-media must be developed further in light of the new digital possibilities and in accordance with EU guidelines.

Courses / trainings
Indigenous Studies Portal

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond. This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to nearly 50,000 items.

Projects and Programmes
United in cultural diversity for challenges in common

United Religions Initiatives' Multiregion is home to grassroots interfaith peacebuilding groups around the world who come together virtually to collaborate, learn, and inspire. At the heart of United Religions Initiatives is a global network of locally organized “Cooperation Circles,” or CCs. Each CC is a grassroots, independently organized, self-governing and self-funded group comprised of at least seven members and representing at least 3 different religions, spiritual expressions or indigenous traditions. These Circles work in their own context to build cooperation among people of all faiths and traditions.

Arts
Traditional dances to develop intercultural dialogue

By reconnecting youth to the practice of cultural traditions, no matter what their religion, color or ethnicity is, Indlondlo Zulu Dancers aims to encourage young people to stay away from drugs and criminal activities, while building an intercultural dialogue through dance, among the members of its dance troupe.

The NGO performs, as well as educates, cultural dances in the rural areas of the Valley of 1000 Hills / KwaNyavu / Mkhambathini and surrounding areas (South Africa). The aim really is about providing a positive model for young men from backgrounds lacking male role models, due to the history of a nation where families were torn apart because men often had to live apart from their families.