Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Building Bridges in Conflict Areas

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities to support organisations and National Agencies (NAs) within the frame of the European Commission's Erasmus+ Youth programme and beyond.

What is this good practice about ?

Conflicts, clashes, fights, and misunderstandings all influence young people all around Europe. In this report, you are invited to an overview of the methods, theories, and tools for a better understanding of conflict resolution.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

Throughout this booklet, SALTO-YOUTH raises the following questions: How to encourage young people and create a safe atmosphere for non-formal learning in places, such as suburbs of Paris or towns and villages of so-called disputed territories in South-East Europe (e.g. Kosovo) and in Eastern Europe and Caucasus (e.g. South Ossetia)? How to help young people overcome clashes and intolerance in migrant societies of Spain, Denmark, or Russia? What kind of activities should we undertake to let young people from different sides of conflict interact?

Courses / trainings
Value the Difference - A Resource Pack by SALTO-YOUTH

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

There are more than 508 million people in Europe, each one an individual with a different background and life experiences. This resource pack explores the topic of cultural diversity and many of the related and complex issues people in Europe face today, so together we can embrace and celebrate each one of those differences.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

It is designed as a starting point for exploration of cultural diversity by youth workers (or anyone who works with young people). The resource pack contains nine chapters, each offering background information, case studies and practical examples of how to engage young people, in the framework of a diversity of topics: Media, Migration and Cultural Diversity, Asylum Seekers and Refugees, Mediation, Cross Community, Identity, Intercultural Competence...

Courses / trainings
Intercultural competences: a diversity of challenges for networks of trainers

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

The Swiss national organisation of the Society for Intercultural Education, Training And Research (SIETAR). SIETAR Switzerland manages a community of over a hundred corporate and individual members including universities, NGOs, intercultural trainers, coaches and academics. Each member has a specific expertise to provide tailored trainings in a variety of contexts / challenges, where specific knowledge of cultural codes and intercultural competences are key for successful outcomes. 

What is this good practice about ?

SIETAR Switzerland organizes a regular program of training sessions, webinars and conferences, tackling a great diversity of topics where intercultural dialogue is central. From a discussion focused on the management of religious diversity at work to the presentation of innovative tools to update a practitioner’s set of methodologies, this page of events provides both experts and the general public a great source of capacity-building activities as well as a dynamic hub of knowledge exchange.

How does this stakeholder contribute to intercultural dialogue?

SIETAR Switzerland equips a variety of audiences with intercultural competences. Some examples: collaborating with managers to develop their cultural intelligence and help them better manage cultural diversity in the workplace; working with professionals who conduct mentorship programs with refugees, to facilitate a mutual engagement; embedding intercultural competences in students to prepare them for global professional roles and to be responsible global citizens; preparing individuals for a diplomatic career or in international co-operation

Media
Radio to give a voice to the ones who have been silenced

Refugee Radio was formed by refugee and human rights workers in 2008. It's a charity that supports refugees, asylum seekers and vulnerable migrants.They have a team of staff who run the projects and a group of refugee volunteers who make it all happen. They run community projects targeting mental health, isolation and social exclusion.

And most importantly, they use radio and music to give a voice to this who do not have one.

Media
Stories of refugees, by the refugees

'3CR community radio provides a media space enabling progressive communities to voice ideas and build their power to create social change' (statement of purpose, 2016).

Refugee Radio features ten refugees and asylum seekers on their journey to a new land. They share the struggle of leaving family and the familiar behind, of learning a new language yet maintaining their culture, and of needing ways to contribute to Australian society. 

Refugee Radio was part of Human Rights Day 10 December 2010 special programming and is supported by the City of Melbourne and the Victorian Multicultural Commission.

Media
Multicultural radio to enact cultural diversity

Australia is one of the world’s most culturally diverse nation, based largely on high levels of immigration in the second part of the 20th century. From the 1970s onwards, Australia formally recognized the massive social changes brought about by postwar immigration, and provided legislation to incorporate cultural diversity into everyday lives. One such ‘legislative’ enactment saw the establishment of multicultural broadcasting in Australia, as arguably a world-first, both in its comprehensiveness and diversity.

Today, Australia has a public sector corporation, the Special Broadcasting Service, administering five radio services in 68 languages. Also, the Community Radio sector produces multicultural programming in 100 languages through a number of its 330 broadcast and 207 narrowcast stations.

This article examines the relationship between radio and its communities. It argues that despite the ‘profile’ of SBS television, radio is much closer to its constituent communities, and therefore plays a greater role in enabling those communities to speak their own histories, beyond the confines of a consensual Anglophile paradigm.

Publications
The role of media to protect cultural identity and diversity

The state creates the conditions, at multiple levels, that guarantee the freedom and quality of the media, the public’s access to it, and diversity of opinion. In Germany, responsibility for media affairs lies principally with the Länder. The Federal Government, however, has legislative powers in specific areas such as telecommunications and copyright. The “Federal Government Report on Media and Communications” (2008) summarizes the Germany’s federal media policy.

Broadcast media, including radio, serve to protect cultural identity as well as diversity and freedom of opinion. The Interstate Broadcasting Agreement of the Länder requires that both private and public broadcasting companies represent diversity through informational, cultural and educational programming. Public broadcasting companies have a particular responsibility for safeguarding cultural identity and cultural memory. Cultural and educational programming is a mainstay of public broadcasters. Statutory rules governing broadcasting and tele-media must be developed further in light of the new digital possibilities and in accordance with EU guidelines.

Media
Learning from Intercultural Storytelling (LISTEN)

The LISTEN project aims at introducing storytelling approaches and techniques to a radio environment as a binding factor which brings social and personal benefits for refugees.

Those techniques will serve to develop in refugee’s and migrant’s personality a construction of personal values, a higher level of self- esteem, and a stronger sense of identity in the community. They could develop for example verbal and communication skills, foreign language skills, improvement of intercultural understanding and social skills and reasoning. Being equipped with these skills and more, refugees and migrants can be a future “cultural mediator” between their community and the hosting society in order to promote reciprocal knowledge and comprehension between subjects of different cultural backgrounds.

Media
Exploring the complicated world of cultural identity

Join the journey suggested by CBC Radio (Canada), that looks at cultural identity and how Indigenous people see themselves in a world that wants to paint them all with one brush. As you might have guessed, identity is a complicated and touchy issue in a lot of Indigenous communities.

Christi Belcourt's own identity often spills out as paint. The award winning artist is Michif and calls Lac Ste. Anne, Alta., home. She tells the story behind a powerful self-portrait that she created after being told she should not be allowed to apply for funding because she was not Indigenous enough.

Amanda Rheaume is a Métis musician based in Ottawa with a very rich family history. And the more she dug into those stories, the more she was inspired to write about her heritage. 

Oscar Baker III grew up in two very different communities. His mother is Mi'kmaq from Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick. His father is black and his hometown is St. Augustine, Florida. He was surrounded by addiction, violence and poverty. As an angry teenager he drank and looked for trouble on the streets of St. Augustine. Eventually, it would threaten to swallow his life whole. But Oscar saw an opportunity and made a life-changing decision.

Unreserved's own Kim Wheeler shares what it was like to grow up in an adopted family outside of her culture and how she found her way back. She is Mohawk and Anishinabe and was adopted out as part of the ;60s scoop or the Adopt an Indian or Métis Child program. As part of an assimilation policy the federal government took thousands of Indigenous children from their families, often without consent. 

Media
#YoSoyRefugio

'There are 65 millions of refugees in the world. Get to know some of their stories'.

The campaign #YoSoyRefugio comes from Proyecto Reflejad@s. It deals with raising awareness on the situation of people who have had to flee their countries, and find themselves in vulnerable contexts. Reflejad@s aims to give them a voice, so that people understand who are the human beings behind headlines and hot news.

Sharing their stories is a way to build a bridge between them, and the rest of the world.