Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Intercultural collaboration in academia thanks to a Diaspora Fellowship Program

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue?

The Institute of International Education (IIE), founded in 1919 (USA). IIE manages a wide offer of intercultural collaboration programs across institutions of higher education, with a worldwide reach. The Institute also dedicates specific efforts to assist scholars, students and artists threatened by conflict and unrest in their home countries.

What is this initiative about ?

The Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program facilitates engagement between scholars born in Africa who are now based in the United States or Canada and scholars in Africa on mutually beneficial academic activities. Managed by IIE, in collaboration with the United States International University-Africa in Nairobi, higher education institutions based in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda are involved in this program. A total of 390 African Diaspora Fellowships have been awarded for scholars to travel to Africa since the program’s inception in 2013.

How is this initiative a good practice of intercultural dialogue? What challenge(s) does it tackle ? What is at stake?

Each person’s vision and references are based on a variety of elements, including their cultural background (systems of value, spiritual beliefs, traditions, etc.). The participants of the program (the fellow and the host) may have cultural references in common, but as they have evolved in different environments, working together gives a unique opportunity to shape new ideas and recommendations, with the exchange of perspectives and skills at the heart the entire process. 

Arts
Traditional dances to develop intercultural dialogue

By reconnecting youth to the practice of cultural traditions, no matter what their religion, color or ethnicity is, Indlondlo Zulu Dancers aims to encourage young people to stay away from drugs and criminal activities, while building an intercultural dialogue through dance, among the members of its dance troupe.

The NGO performs, as well as educates, cultural dances in the rural areas of the Valley of 1000 Hills / KwaNyavu / Mkhambathini and surrounding areas (South Africa). The aim really is about providing a positive model for young men from backgrounds lacking male role models, due to the history of a nation where families were torn apart because men often had to live apart from their families.

Arts
Television and radio drama series to unlock inter-community dialogue

The Crossroads Project promotes alternative ways of resolving conflict leading to social cohesion, reconciliation and lasting peace among communities in Northern and North-Eastern Uganda.

Media Focus on Africa (MFA) designed and produced a 13-episode television and radio drama series – Yat Madit – based on real life experiences in the region. Yat Madit aimed to raise awareness about the plight of post war communities, influence public perceptions towards cultural diversity, and alleviate problems within communities. Sixty intercultural dialogues sessions which involved screening of the drama series were also held to diffuse social barriers and create fertile ground for collaborative problem solving using non-violent methods.

Yat Madit aired on national television, while translated episodes of the series were broadcast across four radio stations in Northern and North-Eastern Uganda. By the end of the dialogues, community members collectively identified their challenges and agreed on the best ways to address them. The project also increased awareness and knowledge on human rights, cultural rights, collaborative problem solving and cultural diversity. MFA aims to replicate this project in the Rwenzori region, another area of recent conflict with a history of cultural and ethnic disputes.

Arts
Dancing to heal the wounds - The Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation Project

Rwanda has faced war and migration since 1959, and genocide against the Tutsi in 1994. Currently Rwanda is inhabited by native groups, people who have migrated from other countries, and migrated Congolese people who have received nationality. The Batwa or “Abasigajwe inyuma n’amateka”, literally translated as those who were neglected by history, form an isolated and marginalized group in Rwandan society. Batwa are widely stigmatized, the Impunyu above all. Taboos surround eating together or even using utensils used by Batwa.

Batwa tradition is rich in song, dance and music. Dance, instinctively arising from music, is one of the most spectacular expressions of the Rwandan culture. The IDARC project (Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation) uses dance to play an important role in civil, economic and social life of the Rwandans. Further, the IDARC project promotes freedom of speech and thought by creating an intercultural dialogue space for peace and development in Rwanda. This project solves two problems; it enables the marginalized ethnic group to express their thoughts and ideas through sharing their culture to the cultural lives of other Rwandans and it promotes understanding and cooperation among Rwandan citizens.

Publications
Including gender equality in the curriculum: discover the Gender Responsive Pedagogy of FAWE!

The model trains teachers to be more gender aware and equips them with the skills to understand and address the specific learning needs of both sexes. It develops teaching practices that engender equal treatment and participation of girls and boys in the classroom and in the wider school community.

Media
Suma Went Walking Audiobook: A Pan-African Symphonic Story

An new African musical piece for children brought by Akoo Books, a publisher and digital distributor of African audiobooks based in Ghana, to introduce them to the individual instruments of the African orchestra and accompany the story ‘Suma Went Walking’, written by Nana Dadson. Each character is represented by an African musical instrument and theme, 10 amazing instruments in all!

It tells the story of a girl, Suma, who takes a walk and meets animals who compare themselves to her. The story is written in English and has been translated to 8 different African languages. The idea of a pan-African symphonic story was inspired by Prokiev’s ‘Peter and the Wolf’. The motivation behind this prokject is the wish to make a composition that would bring the magic and excitement of African musical instruments to children and provide an exciting new way to engage them with the performance of African music in schools.

Such project facilitate an intercultural dialogue thanks to its translation in multiple languages, bringing to many children knowledge about a significant part of African intangible heritage: music!

Publications
Development and Indigenous Peoples in Africa

This Issues Paper on Development and Indigenous Peoples in Africa has been prepared by the Compliance and Safeguards Division of the African Development Bank to give an overview of the state of Indigenous People in Africa, highlighting the options for their inclusion by the Bank in development projects the Bank undertakes in its Regional Member Countries (RMCs).

In performing this assignment, the study team greatly utilized knowledge, information and feedback from a wide range of stakeholders across the continent - governments, civil society organizations, the African Union Working Group on Indigenous Populations/Communities in Africa, which helped the team to draw scenarios, analyze case studies, compare situations and draw conclusions for the report.

Media
See UNESCO’s Newest World Heritage Sites

Last week, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization convened in Manama, Bahrain, for the 42nd session of the annual World Heritage Committee. Representatives from 21 States Parties were tasked with selecting new World Heritage sites, monitoring the conservation of current sites, and reviewing the List of World Heritage in Danger.

Nominees must meet one of 10 criteria—six cultural and four natural—ranging from Earth's most biodiverse landscapes to artistic works of universal significance. This year, the committee recognized 19 new sites for their “outstanding universal value,” extended the boundaries of Central Sikhote-Alin, a Russian biosphere reserve, and removed the Belize Barrier Reef from the List of World Heritage in Danger

“Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations,” according to UNESCO's mission statement. “Our cultural and natural heritage are both irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration.”

Projects and Programmes
FLASHBACK PROMESSE SÉNÉGAL

For 12 long months, young people learned to do things differently, in a sustainable and efficient way. Training sessions in life skills, entrepreneurship, coaching sessions, educational expeditions and retreats were the menu of their learning.

 

Publications
Context Matters: An Ethiopian Case Study Adapting Leadership Development Methods to Serve Different Cultures

This paper elaborates how to contextualize leadership development tools and practices for an African audience, focusing specifically on a case study of LBB work with healthcare leaders working in remote areas of western Ethiopia.