Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Intercultural competences: a diversity of challenges for networks of trainers

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

The Swiss national organisation of the Society for Intercultural Education, Training And Research (SIETAR). SIETAR Switzerland manages a community of over a hundred corporate and individual members including universities, NGOs, intercultural trainers, coaches and academics. Each member has a specific expertise to provide tailored trainings in a variety of contexts / challenges, where specific knowledge of cultural codes and intercultural competences are key for successful outcomes. 

What is this good practice about ?

SIETAR Switzerland organizes a regular program of training sessions, webinars and conferences, tackling a great diversity of topics where intercultural dialogue is central. From a discussion focused on the management of religious diversity at work to the presentation of innovative tools to update a practitioner’s set of methodologies, this page of events provides both experts and the general public a great source of capacity-building activities as well as a dynamic hub of knowledge exchange.

How does this stakeholder contribute to intercultural dialogue?

SIETAR Switzerland equips a variety of audiences with intercultural competences. Some examples: collaborating with managers to develop their cultural intelligence and help them better manage cultural diversity in the workplace; working with professionals who conduct mentorship programs with refugees, to facilitate a mutual engagement; embedding intercultural competences in students to prepare them for global professional roles and to be responsible global citizens; preparing individuals for a diplomatic career or in international co-operation

Media
Radio to give a voice to the ones who have been silenced

Refugee Radio was formed by refugee and human rights workers in 2008. It's a charity that supports refugees, asylum seekers and vulnerable migrants.They have a team of staff who run the projects and a group of refugee volunteers who make it all happen. They run community projects targeting mental health, isolation and social exclusion.

And most importantly, they use radio and music to give a voice to this who do not have one.

Publications
The role of media to protect cultural identity and diversity

The state creates the conditions, at multiple levels, that guarantee the freedom and quality of the media, the public’s access to it, and diversity of opinion. In Germany, responsibility for media affairs lies principally with the Länder. The Federal Government, however, has legislative powers in specific areas such as telecommunications and copyright. The “Federal Government Report on Media and Communications” (2008) summarizes the Germany’s federal media policy.

Broadcast media, including radio, serve to protect cultural identity as well as diversity and freedom of opinion. The Interstate Broadcasting Agreement of the Länder requires that both private and public broadcasting companies represent diversity through informational, cultural and educational programming. Public broadcasting companies have a particular responsibility for safeguarding cultural identity and cultural memory. Cultural and educational programming is a mainstay of public broadcasters. Statutory rules governing broadcasting and tele-media must be developed further in light of the new digital possibilities and in accordance with EU guidelines.

Media
Media, radio and the inclusion of Roma people

RadioExpert is a not-for-profit public service organization founded in 2003 to organize and expedite the continuing activities in support of community media worldwide.

Marginalization of the Romani minorities of Central/Eastern Europe remains among the most difficult problems facing Europe today. The search for solutions must include empowerment of Roma people through education and access to media structures. Media literacy and skills training for Roma youth can provide an effective means for media literacy, collaboration, inclusion, access, education employment skills development and social cohesion.

The Roma Youth Media Project is a multi-year initiative to establish and maintain media training programs for Roma youth in Europe. RadioExpert's goals are to establish enabling environments for Roma youth radio in civil societies, and develop sustainable Roma youth radio, TV and film producers and moderators.

Media
Participatory radio for community development

AMARC is an international non-governmental organization serving the community radio movement, with almost 4 000 members and associates in 150 countries.

Its goal is to support and contribute to the development of community and participatory radio along with the principals of solidarity and international cooperation.

Media
Exploring the complicated world of cultural identity

Join the journey suggested by CBC Radio (Canada), that looks at cultural identity and how Indigenous people see themselves in a world that wants to paint them all with one brush. As you might have guessed, identity is a complicated and touchy issue in a lot of Indigenous communities.

Christi Belcourt's own identity often spills out as paint. The award winning artist is Michif and calls Lac Ste. Anne, Alta., home. She tells the story behind a powerful self-portrait that she created after being told she should not be allowed to apply for funding because she was not Indigenous enough.

Amanda Rheaume is a Métis musician based in Ottawa with a very rich family history. And the more she dug into those stories, the more she was inspired to write about her heritage. 

Oscar Baker III grew up in two very different communities. His mother is Mi'kmaq from Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick. His father is black and his hometown is St. Augustine, Florida. He was surrounded by addiction, violence and poverty. As an angry teenager he drank and looked for trouble on the streets of St. Augustine. Eventually, it would threaten to swallow his life whole. But Oscar saw an opportunity and made a life-changing decision.

Unreserved's own Kim Wheeler shares what it was like to grow up in an adopted family outside of her culture and how she found her way back. She is Mohawk and Anishinabe and was adopted out as part of the ;60s scoop or the Adopt an Indian or Métis Child program. As part of an assimilation policy the federal government took thousands of Indigenous children from their families, often without consent. 

Media
Conflict-Sensitive Reporting and Intercultural Dialogue

The UNESCO Crossings Institute for Conflict-Sensitive Reporting and Intercultural Dialogue has been launched at the University of Oregon in 2013.

Working from curricula developed by UNESCO and the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication, Crossings Institute training in conflict sensitive reporting begins with acknowledgement that conflict is a critical element of most news reporting. Learning to report on conflict with a point of view oriented to what may be a solution rather than a simplistic who-wins-and-who-loses perspective can result in informative and constructive journalism of social value.

Their website works like a radio station, offering to the audience a great variety of radio podcasts and intercultural conversations. on  Professor and Crossings Senior Research Fellow Chris Chavez recently attended a UNESCO Conference on reporting in Nairobi, Kenya. Research fellow Emerson Malone spoke with Chavez on the role journalists can play when reporting conflict-sensitive subjects such as immigration, tribal and religious conflicts in the area.

Media
The Role of Media in Conflict Transformation

Irenees.net is a documentary website whose purpose is to promote an exchange of knowledge and know-how at the service of the construction of an Art of peace.

This article provides an overview of some possible ways in which old and new media can make a positive contribution at different stages of the conflict cycle, from early warning to de-escalation, reconciliation and strengthened social cohesion.

It presents some examples of media production that form an alternative to the mainstream media, which tend to support the powerful. Peace journalism, on the contrary, pays more attention to the perceptions of rank and file members of different groups, paves the way to a better mutual understanding, looks for common ground and explores ways in which different communities can peacefully live together in the future. Among others, radio definitely plays a key role in such contexts.

Courses / trainings
Indigenous Studies Portal

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond. This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to nearly 50,000 items.

Projects and Programmes
Historical memory and dialogue for prevention & healing

Post-Conflict Research Center, based in Bosnia and Herzegovina, creates programs to further the values of justice, peace, cross-cultural understanding, and reconciliation amongst today’s youth, who will shape the historical narratives of tomorrow. Working both locally and regionally, they carry out our youth-focused peace education initiatives with the goal of making sustainable peace a practical reality for young people and society as a whole. They are committed to engaging Balkan youth in programs that promote personal and intellectual growth through deepened understandings of division, conflict, conciliation and pluralism. Their educational programs build on the dissemination of historical memory and dialogue to prevent, mitigate, and transform conflict and post-conflict environments stemming from ethnic, religious and political identities.