Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Media
Radio's impact in Peace Building Process in South Asia

'It is widely accepted that radio is a powerful electronic mass media having a magic power to reach even the remotest area with necessary information, education, entertainment and persuasion.

Radio is a very powerful tool of communication having ability to reach the remote areas even where there is no electricity. Radio is also very useful in the South Asian region to those who are deprived of the light of education. As radio messages are delivered with dialogue, music, words and sentences, they can be easily communicable and understandable to the people who can’t read or write. To reach the grassroots level, the Community Radio (CR) can play effective role.'

Read more of Sheikh Mohammad Shafiul Islam's article about Radio's impact in Peace Building Process in South Asiaby clicking to open the resource!

Media
The Role of Media in Conflict Transformation

Irenees.net is a documentary website whose purpose is to promote an exchange of knowledge and know-how at the service of the construction of an Art of peace.

This article provides an overview of some possible ways in which old and new media can make a positive contribution at different stages of the conflict cycle, from early warning to de-escalation, reconciliation and strengthened social cohesion.

It presents some examples of media production that form an alternative to the mainstream media, which tend to support the powerful. Peace journalism, on the contrary, pays more attention to the perceptions of rank and file members of different groups, paves the way to a better mutual understanding, looks for common ground and explores ways in which different communities can peacefully live together in the future. Among others, radio definitely plays a key role in such contexts.

Projects and Programmes
United in cultural diversity for challenges in common

United Religions Initiatives' Multiregion is home to grassroots interfaith peacebuilding groups around the world who come together virtually to collaborate, learn, and inspire. At the heart of United Religions Initiatives is a global network of locally organized “Cooperation Circles,” or CCs. Each CC is a grassroots, independently organized, self-governing and self-funded group comprised of at least seven members and representing at least 3 different religions, spiritual expressions or indigenous traditions. These Circles work in their own context to build cooperation among people of all faiths and traditions.

Projects and Programmes
Intercultural dialogue to protect a shared environmental heritage

EcoPeace Middle East is a unique organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian, and Israeli environmentalists. Our primary objective is the promotion of cooperative efforts to protect our shared environmental heritage. In so doing, they seek to advance both sustainable regional development and the creation of necessary conditions for lasting peace in our region. EcoPeace has offices in Amman, Ramallah, and Tel-Aviv.

Arts
Storytelling for peace: spark the intercultural dialogue with a movie

Founded in 2003, Just Vision is nonpartisan and religiously unaffiliated. They tell the under-documented stories of Palestinian and Israeli grassroots leaders who work to build a future of freedom, dignity and equality for all. Just Vision approach goes through award-winning films, digital media and targeted public education campaigns that undermine stereotypes, inspire commitment and galvanize action.

Arts
Television and radio drama series to unlock inter-community dialogue

The Crossroads Project promotes alternative ways of resolving conflict leading to social cohesion, reconciliation and lasting peace among communities in Northern and North-Eastern Uganda.

Media Focus on Africa (MFA) designed and produced a 13-episode television and radio drama series – Yat Madit – based on real life experiences in the region. Yat Madit aimed to raise awareness about the plight of post war communities, influence public perceptions towards cultural diversity, and alleviate problems within communities. Sixty intercultural dialogues sessions which involved screening of the drama series were also held to diffuse social barriers and create fertile ground for collaborative problem solving using non-violent methods.

Yat Madit aired on national television, while translated episodes of the series were broadcast across four radio stations in Northern and North-Eastern Uganda. By the end of the dialogues, community members collectively identified their challenges and agreed on the best ways to address them. The project also increased awareness and knowledge on human rights, cultural rights, collaborative problem solving and cultural diversity. MFA aims to replicate this project in the Rwenzori region, another area of recent conflict with a history of cultural and ethnic disputes.

Projects and Programmes
Historical memory and dialogue for prevention & healing

Post-Conflict Research Center, based in Bosnia and Herzegovina, creates programs to further the values of justice, peace, cross-cultural understanding, and reconciliation amongst today’s youth, who will shape the historical narratives of tomorrow. Working both locally and regionally, they carry out our youth-focused peace education initiatives with the goal of making sustainable peace a practical reality for young people and society as a whole. They are committed to engaging Balkan youth in programs that promote personal and intellectual growth through deepened understandings of division, conflict, conciliation and pluralism. Their educational programs build on the dissemination of historical memory and dialogue to prevent, mitigate, and transform conflict and post-conflict environments stemming from ethnic, religious and political identities.

Publications
Arts and Culture for intercultural dialogue: Concepts, Policies, Programmes & Practices

The concept of intercultural dialogue will have different meanings in different countries depending upon their histories, traditions, population structures, concepts of
citizenship and the distribution of rights and freedoms.

Indeed studies show that intercultural dialogue has been understood in a plurality of ways ranging from promoting: a culture of peace, a dialogue of or among civilisations, cultural co-operation or diplomacy, integration and social cohesion through community participation, etc. It has also been used interchangeably with terms such as ‘cultural diversity’ or ‘multiculturalism’. Some have even argued that the concept is in itself contentious and places artificial boundaries around cultures and their ‘representatives’.

The present resource maps views and collect examples of good practice on the role of intercultural dialogue in the arts and arts policies.

Arts
Dancing to heal the wounds - The Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation Project

Rwanda has faced war and migration since 1959, and genocide against the Tutsi in 1994. Currently Rwanda is inhabited by native groups, people who have migrated from other countries, and migrated Congolese people who have received nationality. The Batwa or “Abasigajwe inyuma n’amateka”, literally translated as those who were neglected by history, form an isolated and marginalized group in Rwandan society. Batwa are widely stigmatized, the Impunyu above all. Taboos surround eating together or even using utensils used by Batwa.

Batwa tradition is rich in song, dance and music. Dance, instinctively arising from music, is one of the most spectacular expressions of the Rwandan culture. The IDARC project (Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation) uses dance to play an important role in civil, economic and social life of the Rwandans. Further, the IDARC project promotes freedom of speech and thought by creating an intercultural dialogue space for peace and development in Rwanda. This project solves two problems; it enables the marginalized ethnic group to express their thoughts and ideas through sharing their culture to the cultural lives of other Rwandans and it promotes understanding and cooperation among Rwandan citizens.

Projects and Programmes
The InterFaith World Tour

Discover the international journey of four young people with different religious beliefs, who have travelled together in more than 20 countries in the world in order to better understand how people live their religious and non religious beliefs, as well as their concrete actions to manage a peaceful coexistence in society.