Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Value the Difference - A Resource Pack by SALTO-YOUTH

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

There are more than 508 million people in Europe, each one an individual with a different background and life experiences. This resource pack explores the topic of cultural diversity and many of the related and complex issues people in Europe face today, so together we can embrace and celebrate each one of those differences.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

It is designed as a starting point for exploration of cultural diversity by youth workers (or anyone who works with young people). The resource pack contains nine chapters, each offering background information, case studies and practical examples of how to engage young people, in the framework of a diversity of topics: Media, Migration and Cultural Diversity, Asylum Seekers and Refugees, Mediation, Cross Community, Identity, Intercultural Competence...

Media
Conflict-Sensitive Reporting and Intercultural Dialogue

The UNESCO Crossings Institute for Conflict-Sensitive Reporting and Intercultural Dialogue has been launched at the University of Oregon in 2013.

Working from curricula developed by UNESCO and the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication, Crossings Institute training in conflict sensitive reporting begins with acknowledgement that conflict is a critical element of most news reporting. Learning to report on conflict with a point of view oriented to what may be a solution rather than a simplistic who-wins-and-who-loses perspective can result in informative and constructive journalism of social value.

Their website works like a radio station, offering to the audience a great variety of radio podcasts and intercultural conversations. on  Professor and Crossings Senior Research Fellow Chris Chavez recently attended a UNESCO Conference on reporting in Nairobi, Kenya. Research fellow Emerson Malone spoke with Chavez on the role journalists can play when reporting conflict-sensitive subjects such as immigration, tribal and religious conflicts in the area.

Media
Multicultural radio to enact cultural diversity

Australia is one of the world’s most culturally diverse nation, based largely on high levels of immigration in the second part of the 20th century. From the 1970s onwards, Australia formally recognized the massive social changes brought about by postwar immigration, and provided legislation to incorporate cultural diversity into everyday lives. One such ‘legislative’ enactment saw the establishment of multicultural broadcasting in Australia, as arguably a world-first, both in its comprehensiveness and diversity.

Today, Australia has a public sector corporation, the Special Broadcasting Service, administering five radio services in 68 languages. Also, the Community Radio sector produces multicultural programming in 100 languages through a number of its 330 broadcast and 207 narrowcast stations.

This article examines the relationship between radio and its communities. It argues that despite the ‘profile’ of SBS television, radio is much closer to its constituent communities, and therefore plays a greater role in enabling those communities to speak their own histories, beyond the confines of a consensual Anglophile paradigm.

Arts
Dancing to heal the wounds - The Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation Project

Rwanda has faced war and migration since 1959, and genocide against the Tutsi in 1994. Currently Rwanda is inhabited by native groups, people who have migrated from other countries, and migrated Congolese people who have received nationality. The Batwa or “Abasigajwe inyuma n’amateka”, literally translated as those who were neglected by history, form an isolated and marginalized group in Rwandan society. Batwa are widely stigmatized, the Impunyu above all. Taboos surround eating together or even using utensils used by Batwa.

Batwa tradition is rich in song, dance and music. Dance, instinctively arising from music, is one of the most spectacular expressions of the Rwandan culture. The IDARC project (Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation) uses dance to play an important role in civil, economic and social life of the Rwandans. Further, the IDARC project promotes freedom of speech and thought by creating an intercultural dialogue space for peace and development in Rwanda. This project solves two problems; it enables the marginalized ethnic group to express their thoughts and ideas through sharing their culture to the cultural lives of other Rwandans and it promotes understanding and cooperation among Rwandan citizens.

Publications
Addressing tolerance and diversity discourses in Europe

This book of Ricard Zapata-Barrero and Anna Triandafyllidou seeks to offer a European view of diversity challenges and the ways in which they are dealt with. It highlights important similarities and differences and identifies the groups that are worse off in the countries studied.

While it may be difficult to devise policy approaches that are responsive to the needs of all the 16 European countries studied here (let alone the 27 EU member states), it is however possible to develop policies that address a number of European countries that share common or parallel migration and ethnic minority experiences.

Publications
Intergenerational Relations in Newly-Arrived Communities in Victoria, Australia

The Ethnic Communities Council of Victoria (ECCV) and the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation (ADI), Deakin University share a common concern with understanding intergenerational issues among newly arrived communities in Victoria. Intergenerational relationships serve as both a strength and vulnerability during the often harsh process of family migration. These tensions are often not easily understood by research and policy makers, not least because community emotions can fall outside the scope of the policy process. Compounding this is a contemporary policy climate focusing on social cohesion and disengaged youth.

This study examines the nature of relations between parents and adolescents in newly-arrived migrant communities in Victoria, Australia as they negotiate the challenges of migration, settlement and integration.

 

Projects and Programmes
'Identity: Yours, Mine, Ours' - Exhibition Research Project Evaluation Report

In 2011, Museum Victoria launched the Identity: Yours, Mine, Ours (IYMO) exhibition at the Immigration Museum in Melbourne. This major long-term exhibition targeted secondary school students as a primary audience, its key themes addressing curriculum units relating to identity, belonging and ethnicity. The exhibition’s core aims were to provide a dynamic participatory environment that encouraged reflection, challenged assumptions and compelled visitors to think about ways they could effect positive change in their everyday lives.

This project aimed to understand the public role of museums in countering racism and promoting positive attitudes and acceptance toward people from diverse racial, ethnic and cultural groups.

Media
Research opposes media narrative of ‘African gangs’ in Melbourne

“Most Australians form their views on public issues, particularly those in relation to migration and diversity, from the mainstream media and political discourse. Simplistic, reductionist and negative reporting of African-Australian youths leads to whole communities being stigmatised to a point where it is acceptable for them to be publicly denigrated and ostracised,” Professor Mansouri said.

Discover the entire article in which UNESCO Chair of Cultural Diversity and Social Justice / Professor Fethi Mansouri responds to a moral panic over ‘African gangs’ in Australian media narratives and called for contextualisation of the issues surrounding these sensationalised reporting.

Publications
Cities leading for immigrant integration

This Americas Society/Council of the Americas and Welcoming America report, authored by the USC Center for the Study of Immigration Integration, explores the quiet revolution taking place in U.S. cities and metropolitan areas, where municipalities are actively devising and implementing strategies to better welcome and integrate new Americans.

Publications
Labour migration in the Asia-Pacific region

Jay Song of the Lowy Institute has published a paper examining the nature of Labour Migration in Asia-Pacific region and its relationship to pathways for people seeking asylum. The paper aims to identify ways in which countries can extend legal labour-based schemes to refugees and people seeking asylum, who might otherwise be at risk from people smugglers and human traffickers.