Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
One Identity, Multiple Belongings

Facing History and Ourselves is a nonprofit international educational and professional development organization. Their mission is to engage students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice, and antisemitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. By studying the historical development of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make the essential connection between history and the moral choices they confront in their own lives.

In this activity, Facing History and Ourselves invites to read a short piece from Amin Maalouf, a writer who was born in Lebanon and immigrated to France, who resists other people’s attempts to oversimplify his identity. Following the reading, educators are given a few connecting questions in order to have a discussion with the group.

Publications
Addressing tolerance and diversity discourses in Europe

This book of Ricard Zapata-Barrero and Anna Triandafyllidou seeks to offer a European view of diversity challenges and the ways in which they are dealt with. It highlights important similarities and differences and identifies the groups that are worse off in the countries studied.

While it may be difficult to devise policy approaches that are responsive to the needs of all the 16 European countries studied here (let alone the 27 EU member states), it is however possible to develop policies that address a number of European countries that share common or parallel migration and ethnic minority experiences.

Courses / trainings
Averting Violent Extremism: Religious Literacy, Pluralism and Community Resilience

The Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam, in collaboration with the Intercultural Dialogue Institute – Ottawa and the Canadian Council of Muslim Women, hosted a workshop entitled “Averting Violent Extremism: Religious Literacy, Pluralism and Community Resilience” on February 4 and 5, 2016.

The overall goal of the interdisciplinary workshop was to assess the viability of the religious literacy approach in ameliorating the attractiveness of violent extremism for vulnerable youth. It was an interactive event designed to enable broad participation by a large number of knowledgeable and experienced people.

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Publications
Culture & the arts: intercultural dialogue in migratory crisis

Report with case studies, by the working group of EU Member States’ experts on intercultural dialogue in the context of the migratory and refugee crisis under the open method of coordination - Study

In the context of the migratory and refugee crisis, explore the ways culture and the arts can help to bring individuals and peoples together, increase their participation in cultural and societal life as well as to promote intercultural dialogue and cultural diversity. Links will be established with other EU-level integration networks and databases. Experts will take stock of the policies and existing good practices on intercultural dialogue 5with a special focus on the integration of migrants and refugees in societies through the arts and culture.

Arts
Dancing to heal the wounds - The Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation Project

Rwanda has faced war and migration since 1959, and genocide against the Tutsi in 1994. Currently Rwanda is inhabited by native groups, people who have migrated from other countries, and migrated Congolese people who have received nationality. The Batwa or “Abasigajwe inyuma n’amateka”, literally translated as those who were neglected by history, form an isolated and marginalized group in Rwandan society. Batwa are widely stigmatized, the Impunyu above all. Taboos surround eating together or even using utensils used by Batwa.

Batwa tradition is rich in song, dance and music. Dance, instinctively arising from music, is one of the most spectacular expressions of the Rwandan culture. The IDARC project (Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation) uses dance to play an important role in civil, economic and social life of the Rwandans. Further, the IDARC project promotes freedom of speech and thought by creating an intercultural dialogue space for peace and development in Rwanda. This project solves two problems; it enables the marginalized ethnic group to express their thoughts and ideas through sharing their culture to the cultural lives of other Rwandans and it promotes understanding and cooperation among Rwandan citizens.

Publications
A Guide to Culturally Competent Nursing Care

Cultural respect is vital to reduce health disparities and improve access to high-quality healthcare that is responsive to patients’ needs, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Nurses must respond to changing patient demographics to provide culturally sensitive care. This need is strikingly evident in critical care units.

Courses / trainings
Gender-inclusive education in Sciences - Toolkit for Museums

Hypatia Project tackles the issue of gender inequality when it comes to engaging with Sciences - especially in the field of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education (STEM). Overall, young girls and women are less included in these subjects: no specific efforts are made to facilitate their involvement, to grab their attention, to trigger their interest. This happens in multiple environments such as schools, museums etc., and stereotypes remain very strong - not only regarding young girls and women but also regarding young boys men's role in Sciences.

The project team has designed very practical toolkits, providing concrete solutions (including hands-on activities, informal discussions and meetings with STEM professionals) to bridge the divide. Discover now the wide range of possibilities, with ready-to-use digital collection of modules / activities aimed at teenagers to be used by informal learning cultural organisations to promote gender inclusion.

Courses / trainings
Gender-inclusive education in Sciences - Toolkit for industries and research organisations

Hypatia Project tackles the issue of gender inequality when it comes to engaging with Sciences - especially in the field of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education (STEM). Overall, young girls and women are less included in these subjects: no specific efforts are made to facilitate their involvement, to grab their attention, to trigger their interest. This happens in multiple environments such as schools, museums etc., and stereotypes remain very strong - not only regarding young girls and women but also regarding young boys men's role in Sciences.

The project team has designed very practical toolkits, providing concrete solutions (including hands-on activities, informal discussions and meetings with STEM professionals) to bridge the divide. Discover now the wide range of possibilities, with ready-to-use digital collection of modules / activities aimed at teenagers to be used to be used by researchers and industry.

Courses / trainings
Gender-inclusive education in Sciences - Toolkit for Schools

Hypatia Project tackles the issue of gender inequality when it comes to engaging with Sciences - especially in the field of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education (STEM). Overall, young girls and women are less included in these subjects: no specific efforts are made to facilitate their involvement, to grab their attention, to trigger their interest. This happens in multiple environments such as schools, museums etc., and stereotypes remain very strong - not only regarding young girls and women but also regarding young boys men's role in Sciences.

The project team has designed very practical toolkits, providing concrete solutions (including hands-on activities, informal discussions and meetings with STEM professionals) to bridge the divide. Discover now the wide range of possibilities, with ready-to-use digital collection of modules / activities aimed at teenagers to be used by teachers.

Publications
Intercultural dialogue for gender inclusion in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education

What is at stake?

Research shows that many institutions involved in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education (STEM) have built-in gender excluding mechanisms.

How can intercultural dialogue help?

In this specific case, intercultural dialogue is essential to build gender-inclusive environments, in schools, museums, research institutions etc. dealing with STEM on an every-day basis. Providing the opportunity to tackle the issue of discrimination based on gender, through an open dialogue between girls and boys, women and men, will be key to assess the tangible situations of injustice, to exchange ideas and to eventually work together to shape sustainable solutions.

Why is this a good practice?

Project HYPATIA has been engaging with schools, museums, research institutions and industry, in multiple places of the world, in order to provide staff members, managers, and decision makers in STEM education with concrete and operational guidelines on how to change the way science, technology, engineering, and mathematics is communicated. Such recommendations have been built on the collection of various best practices, that the document highlights with dedicated links.