Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Publications
Arts and Culture for intercultural dialogue: Concepts, Policies, Programmes & Practices

The concept of intercultural dialogue will have different meanings in different countries depending upon their histories, traditions, population structures, concepts of
citizenship and the distribution of rights and freedoms.

Indeed studies show that intercultural dialogue has been understood in a plurality of ways ranging from promoting: a culture of peace, a dialogue of or among civilisations, cultural co-operation or diplomacy, integration and social cohesion through community participation, etc. It has also been used interchangeably with terms such as ‘cultural diversity’ or ‘multiculturalism’. Some have even argued that the concept is in itself contentious and places artificial boundaries around cultures and their ‘representatives’.

The present resource maps views and collect examples of good practice on the role of intercultural dialogue in the arts and arts policies.

Projects and Programmes
United in cultural diversity for challenges in common

United Religions Initiatives' Multiregion is home to grassroots interfaith peacebuilding groups around the world who come together virtually to collaborate, learn, and inspire. At the heart of United Religions Initiatives is a global network of locally organized “Cooperation Circles,” or CCs. Each CC is a grassroots, independently organized, self-governing and self-funded group comprised of at least seven members and representing at least 3 different religions, spiritual expressions or indigenous traditions. These Circles work in their own context to build cooperation among people of all faiths and traditions.

Arts
Television and radio drama series to unlock inter-community dialogue

The Crossroads Project promotes alternative ways of resolving conflict leading to social cohesion, reconciliation and lasting peace among communities in Northern and North-Eastern Uganda.

Media Focus on Africa (MFA) designed and produced a 13-episode television and radio drama series – Yat Madit – based on real life experiences in the region. Yat Madit aimed to raise awareness about the plight of post war communities, influence public perceptions towards cultural diversity, and alleviate problems within communities. Sixty intercultural dialogues sessions which involved screening of the drama series were also held to diffuse social barriers and create fertile ground for collaborative problem solving using non-violent methods.

Yat Madit aired on national television, while translated episodes of the series were broadcast across four radio stations in Northern and North-Eastern Uganda. By the end of the dialogues, community members collectively identified their challenges and agreed on the best ways to address them. The project also increased awareness and knowledge on human rights, cultural rights, collaborative problem solving and cultural diversity. MFA aims to replicate this project in the Rwenzori region, another area of recent conflict with a history of cultural and ethnic disputes.

Arts
Traditional dances to develop intercultural dialogue

By reconnecting youth to the practice of cultural traditions, no matter what their religion, color or ethnicity is, Indlondlo Zulu Dancers aims to encourage young people to stay away from drugs and criminal activities, while building an intercultural dialogue through dance, among the members of its dance troupe.

The NGO performs, as well as educates, cultural dances in the rural areas of the Valley of 1000 Hills / KwaNyavu / Mkhambathini and surrounding areas (South Africa). The aim really is about providing a positive model for young men from backgrounds lacking male role models, due to the history of a nation where families were torn apart because men often had to live apart from their families.

Projects and Programmes
Historical memory and dialogue for prevention & healing

Post-Conflict Research Center, based in Bosnia and Herzegovina, creates programs to further the values of justice, peace, cross-cultural understanding, and reconciliation amongst today’s youth, who will shape the historical narratives of tomorrow. Working both locally and regionally, they carry out our youth-focused peace education initiatives with the goal of making sustainable peace a practical reality for young people and society as a whole. They are committed to engaging Balkan youth in programs that promote personal and intellectual growth through deepened understandings of division, conflict, conciliation and pluralism. Their educational programs build on the dissemination of historical memory and dialogue to prevent, mitigate, and transform conflict and post-conflict environments stemming from ethnic, religious and political identities.

Courses / trainings
Averting Violent Extremism: Religious Literacy, Pluralism and Community Resilience

The Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam, in collaboration with the Intercultural Dialogue Institute – Ottawa and the Canadian Council of Muslim Women, hosted a workshop entitled “Averting Violent Extremism: Religious Literacy, Pluralism and Community Resilience” on February 4 and 5, 2016.

The overall goal of the interdisciplinary workshop was to assess the viability of the religious literacy approach in ameliorating the attractiveness of violent extremism for vulnerable youth. It was an interactive event designed to enable broad participation by a large number of knowledgeable and experienced people.

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Publications
A Guide to Culturally Competent Nursing Care

Cultural respect is vital to reduce health disparities and improve access to high-quality healthcare that is responsive to patients’ needs, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Nurses must respond to changing patient demographics to provide culturally sensitive care. This need is strikingly evident in critical care units.

Publications
Culture & the arts: intercultural dialogue in migratory crisis

Report with case studies, by the working group of EU Member States’ experts on intercultural dialogue in the context of the migratory and refugee crisis under the open method of coordination - Study

In the context of the migratory and refugee crisis, explore the ways culture and the arts can help to bring individuals and peoples together, increase their participation in cultural and societal life as well as to promote intercultural dialogue and cultural diversity. Links will be established with other EU-level integration networks and databases. Experts will take stock of the policies and existing good practices on intercultural dialogue 5with a special focus on the integration of migrants and refugees in societies through the arts and culture.

Courses / trainings
One Identity, Multiple Belongings

Facing History and Ourselves is a nonprofit international educational and professional development organization. Their mission is to engage students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice, and antisemitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. By studying the historical development of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make the essential connection between history and the moral choices they confront in their own lives.

In this activity, Facing History and Ourselves invites to read a short piece from Amin Maalouf, a writer who was born in Lebanon and immigrated to France, who resists other people’s attempts to oversimplify his identity. Following the reading, educators are given a few connecting questions in order to have a discussion with the group.

Arts
History, memory, and homage: the power of music to drive an intercultural dialogue

Joined by a global array of musicians, music researcher and virtuoso Jordi Savall traces the relevant story of the African diaspora and its musical legacy across centuries and continents in 'The Routes of Slavery'. This multicultural performance of music and dance, interspersed with dramatic readings, features artists from Africa, the Americas and Europe.

Together, the artists trace the journey of enslaved peoples from 1444 to 1888, showcasing the musical traditions they brought with them and how these cross-pollinated with other indigenous cultures during the African Diaspora. When Savall first designed 'The Routes of Slavery' several years ago, he chose from the outset to collaborate with, and give the performance platform to, artists representing the cultures to whose history the show pays homage.