Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Arts
Traditional dances to develop intercultural dialogue

By reconnecting youth to the practice of cultural traditions, no matter what their religion, color or ethnicity is, Indlondlo Zulu Dancers aims to encourage young people to stay away from drugs and criminal activities, while building an intercultural dialogue through dance, among the members of its dance troupe.

The NGO performs, as well as educates, cultural dances in the rural areas of the Valley of 1000 Hills / KwaNyavu / Mkhambathini and surrounding areas (South Africa). The aim really is about providing a positive model for young men from backgrounds lacking male role models, due to the history of a nation where families were torn apart because men often had to live apart from their families.

Projects and Programmes
Intercultural dialogue to protect a shared environmental heritage

EcoPeace Middle East is a unique organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian, and Israeli environmentalists. Our primary objective is the promotion of cooperative efforts to protect our shared environmental heritage. In so doing, they seek to advance both sustainable regional development and the creation of necessary conditions for lasting peace in our region. EcoPeace has offices in Amman, Ramallah, and Tel-Aviv.

Publications
Arts and Culture for intercultural dialogue: Concepts, Policies, Programmes & Practices

The concept of intercultural dialogue will have different meanings in different countries depending upon their histories, traditions, population structures, concepts of
citizenship and the distribution of rights and freedoms.

Indeed studies show that intercultural dialogue has been understood in a plurality of ways ranging from promoting: a culture of peace, a dialogue of or among civilisations, cultural co-operation or diplomacy, integration and social cohesion through community participation, etc. It has also been used interchangeably with terms such as ‘cultural diversity’ or ‘multiculturalism’. Some have even argued that the concept is in itself contentious and places artificial boundaries around cultures and their ‘representatives’.

The present resource maps views and collect examples of good practice on the role of intercultural dialogue in the arts and arts policies.

Courses / trainings
One Identity, Multiple Belongings

Facing History and Ourselves is a nonprofit international educational and professional development organization. Their mission is to engage students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice, and antisemitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. By studying the historical development of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make the essential connection between history and the moral choices they confront in their own lives.

In this activity, Facing History and Ourselves invites to read a short piece from Amin Maalouf, a writer who was born in Lebanon and immigrated to France, who resists other people’s attempts to oversimplify his identity. Following the reading, educators are given a few connecting questions in order to have a discussion with the group.

Arts
Dancing to heal the wounds - The Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation Project

Rwanda has faced war and migration since 1959, and genocide against the Tutsi in 1994. Currently Rwanda is inhabited by native groups, people who have migrated from other countries, and migrated Congolese people who have received nationality. The Batwa or “Abasigajwe inyuma n’amateka”, literally translated as those who were neglected by history, form an isolated and marginalized group in Rwandan society. Batwa are widely stigmatized, the Impunyu above all. Taboos surround eating together or even using utensils used by Batwa.

Batwa tradition is rich in song, dance and music. Dance, instinctively arising from music, is one of the most spectacular expressions of the Rwandan culture. The IDARC project (Intercultural Dialogue Awareness Rising for Cooperation) uses dance to play an important role in civil, economic and social life of the Rwandans. Further, the IDARC project promotes freedom of speech and thought by creating an intercultural dialogue space for peace and development in Rwanda. This project solves two problems; it enables the marginalized ethnic group to express their thoughts and ideas through sharing their culture to the cultural lives of other Rwandans and it promotes understanding and cooperation among Rwandan citizens.

Publications
Reshaping Cultural Policies: 2018 Global Report

The Global Report series has been designed to monitor the implementation of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (2005). It provides evidence of how this implementation process contributes to attaining the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals and targets. The 2018 Global Report analyses progress achieved in implementing the 2005 Convention since the first Global Report was published in 2015.

he Global Report series produce new and valuable evidence to inform cultural policy making and advance creativity for development. 

Grounded in the analysis of the Quadrennial Periodic Reports submitted by Parties to the Convention and relevant new findings, this report examines how the 2005 Convention has inspired policy change at the global and country level in ten areas of monitoring. It puts forward a set of policy recommendations for the future, addressing the adaptation of cultural policies to rapid change in the digital environment, based on human rights and fundamental freedoms of expression.

Arts
History, memory, and homage: the power of music to drive an intercultural dialogue

Joined by a global array of musicians, music researcher and virtuoso Jordi Savall traces the relevant story of the African diaspora and its musical legacy across centuries and continents in 'The Routes of Slavery'. This multicultural performance of music and dance, interspersed with dramatic readings, features artists from Africa, the Americas and Europe.

Together, the artists trace the journey of enslaved peoples from 1444 to 1888, showcasing the musical traditions they brought with them and how these cross-pollinated with other indigenous cultures during the African Diaspora. When Savall first designed 'The Routes of Slavery' several years ago, he chose from the outset to collaborate with, and give the performance platform to, artists representing the cultures to whose history the show pays homage.

Arts
Opening the dialogue under a common concern: waste

Discover 'Khadra', a short documentary that follows four women in Tripoli, Lebanon, who are using recycling to transform and bring together the city’s Alawite and Sunni communities after the Syrian conflict reignited tensions and hundreds of people were killed in violent clashes.
The film will follow the women on their journey to form a recycling partnership between neighbourhoods with a history of extreme tension and violence.

Publications
Intercultural cooperation for the sake of water management

This e-book represents the fruitful outcome of the participation of the Foundation Cardinal Paul Poupard - part of the UNESCO Chair in Mumbai - participation to the European Union side events during Paris Climate Change Conference held in 2015.

The purpose was to gather well-known personalities from various countries, who are active in the fields of either water management or religion, in order to bring together ideas on how to shape sustainable solutions to tackle the water scarcity crisis, building on knowledge of spiritual beliefs of the communities.

The present e-book showcases interventions of multiple stakeholders, such as the Rector of PUC -Rio Pe.Josafa Carlos de Siquera SJ , the Secretary General of the Water Accademy  in Paris M. Jean Louis Oliver, Former Rector of the Catholic University of Congo ,Professor Jean bosco Matand, and Nestor Sirotenko, Bishop of Chersonesus (Russian Orthodox Church).

Courses / trainings
Writing Peace: how can writing systems support a better understanding of the world around us?

“Writing Peace” is a manual that invites young audiences to discover contemporary writings through the introduction of various languages. Its goal is to make the world appear a little closer and a little more familiar. "Writing Peace" encourages children (ages8 to 14) to become aware of the interdependence of cultures through familiarization with contemporary writing systems, their history, and their borrowings.

The manual contains 24 activity sheets. Each section presents the characters of a writing system, an introductory text and historical background, the word “peace” and the word “hello,” the language(s) attached to the system(s), and an activity whose answers appear at the end of manual.

Six thousand years after the advent of writing, what do we know about others, their systems of thought, and the transcriptions of their writing systems? How can different writing systems contribute to a better understanding of the world and our place within it? By beginning to learn about these writings and their fascinating beauty, the manual connects children to diversity, thus opening their eyes to the concept of peace and our awareness of it.