Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Intercultural dialogue in Napoli: a culture of living together for underage youth

Since 2001, Dedalus, a Neapolitan social cooperative, has been conducting numerous projects of intercultural dialogue, to promote a culture of living together in peace. Among several areas of focus, including women's rights and marginalized urban communities, the cooperative dedicates great efforts to addressing lonely underage youth immigrating in Naples, as well as ensuring the respect of their human rights such as security and education.

Their initiatives include material, administrative and legal support as well as linguistic-cultural mediation, activities related to discover and share intangible heritage, Italian language classes, professional training to develop skills for specific working environments...: discover on their official website the details of their work, that drives a strong dynamic to spread a culture of living together in peace!

 

Media
Suma Went Walking Audiobook: A Pan-African Symphonic Story

An new African musical piece for children brought by Akoo Books, a publisher and digital distributor of African audiobooks based in Ghana, to introduce them to the individual instruments of the African orchestra and accompany the story ‘Suma Went Walking’, written by Nana Dadson. Each character is represented by an African musical instrument and theme, 10 amazing instruments in all!

It tells the story of a girl, Suma, who takes a walk and meets animals who compare themselves to her. The story is written in English and has been translated to 8 different African languages. The idea of a pan-African symphonic story was inspired by Prokiev’s ‘Peter and the Wolf’. The motivation behind this prokject is the wish to make a composition that would bring the magic and excitement of African musical instruments to children and provide an exciting new way to engage them with the performance of African music in schools.

Such project facilitate an intercultural dialogue thanks to its translation in multiple languages, bringing to many children knowledge about a significant part of African intangible heritage: music!

Courses / trainings
Writing Peace: how can writing systems support a better understanding of the world around us?

“Writing Peace” is a manual that invites young audiences to discover contemporary writings through the introduction of various languages. Its goal is to make the world appear a little closer and a little more familiar. "Writing Peace" encourages children (ages8 to 14) to become aware of the interdependence of cultures through familiarization with contemporary writing systems, their history, and their borrowings.

The manual contains 24 activity sheets. Each section presents the characters of a writing system, an introductory text and historical background, the word “peace” and the word “hello,” the language(s) attached to the system(s), and an activity whose answers appear at the end of manual.

Six thousand years after the advent of writing, what do we know about others, their systems of thought, and the transcriptions of their writing systems? How can different writing systems contribute to a better understanding of the world and our place within it? By beginning to learn about these writings and their fascinating beauty, the manual connects children to diversity, thus opening their eyes to the concept of peace and our awareness of it.

Media
We Are Humanity

The Jarawas are the last descendants of the first humains.

Somewhere on this planet, there still exists a secret place isolated from the rest of the world. The last untouched paradise where the first humans are still living the same way from the beginning of humankind. They are the Jarawas.

Director Alexandre Dereims whose documentaries have received numerous awards (international prize of the Red Cross, Albert London prize, Golden Nymph of Monaco), he gives the floor to this people in danger while launching a petition to sanctuarise the islands where they survive in his most recent film:

We Are Humanity / Nous sommes l'Humanité (2017). 

On the Andamas Islands, off India, in an isolated place from the rest of the world, the Jarawas still live as at the beginning of humanity. Having come from Africa 70,000 years ago, they are only 400 and their way of life is threatened by the Indian settlers who want to transform their territory by exploiting the forests and by transforming these islands in tourist paradise.

They are the ancestors of the Asian people and the American natives.

Today, there is only a population of 400 people left.

 

 

Media
Cultures with Vivendi: Intercultural Dialogue

This section provides bridges between continents, invites to learn more about other cultures and fosters a spirit of openness via a number of testimonials and reports.

"Culture(s) with Vivendi" is in line with Vivendi's corporate social responsibility strategy, which aims to promote cultural diversity, facilitate access to knowledge, encourage the expression of talent and participation in cultural life, and promote a spirit of openness.


Launched on 21 May 2012, Culture(s) with Vivendi aims at providing a concrete illustration of the role played by cultural and creative industries in fostering economic growth, enhancing social cohesion and fuelling innovation. The website is composed of four parts:

  • the "Artist Inspiration" section shows the diversity of musical and cinematographic influences that help artistic creativity to flourish;

  • the "Creative jobs" section presents the value chain and the wealth of career paths within the cultural industries, explained by actual professionals in the field

  • the "Intercultural Dialogue" section demonstrates the linkages between culture and mutual understanding;

  • the "De Facto" section puts culture at the heart of sustainable development through facts and figures, testimonies and reports. "De Facto"  is a forum for those to want to highlight the linkages between culture, human development, openness, access to knowledge and fight against poverty. It serves as a resource center gathering the statements on why and how culture should be integrated within the new world sustainable development agenda and the Millennium Goals that will be agreed on for 2015-2030.

Media
See UNESCO’s Newest World Heritage Sites

Last week, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization convened in Manama, Bahrain, for the 42nd session of the annual World Heritage Committee. Representatives from 21 States Parties were tasked with selecting new World Heritage sites, monitoring the conservation of current sites, and reviewing the List of World Heritage in Danger.

Nominees must meet one of 10 criteria—six cultural and four natural—ranging from Earth's most biodiverse landscapes to artistic works of universal significance. This year, the committee recognized 19 new sites for their “outstanding universal value,” extended the boundaries of Central Sikhote-Alin, a Russian biosphere reserve, and removed the Belize Barrier Reef from the List of World Heritage in Danger

“Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations,” according to UNESCO's mission statement. “Our cultural and natural heritage are both irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration.”

Media
Life at the Café

An association of zinc and metal professionals wants to bring the bistros and terraces of Paris into the list of intangible cultural heritage of UNESCO as both an art of living and a proven form of social connection..

Already, in 2010, it was the gastronomic meal of the French that had integrated the list of intangible cultural heritage. It is not always about high gastronomy but rather the popular ritual of the meal, daily or for special occasions, that of the holidays or the one where we receive guests, the dish of the day at the bistro or the bourgeois cuisine. It is both an art of living and a proven form of social connection. Tomorrow, it is therefore the cafes and terraces of Paris that could be included in the list of Unesco.

 

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Une association de professionnels du zinc veut faire entrer les bistrots et terrasses de Paris au patrimoine culturel immatériel de l’Unesco.

Déjà, en 2010, c’était le repas gastronomique des Français qui avait intégré la liste du patrimoine culturel immatériel. Il ne s’agissait pas en l’occurrence de la haute gastronomie mais du rituel populaire du repas, quotidien ou exceptionnel, celui des fêtes ou bien celui où l’on reçoit, le plat du jour au bistrot ou la cuisine bourgeoise. Soit à la fois un art de vivre et une forme éprouvée du lien social. Demain, ce sont donc les cafés et terrasses de Paris qui pourraient figurer dans la liste de l’Unesco. 

 

Projects and Programmes
Meet My Mama: Enabling Migrant and Refugee Women to Live From Their Kitchen

A social enterprise that detects and values ​​the culinary talents of women. Through culinary meetings and a catering service, Meet My Mom gives them the power to confirm their know-how, and promotes a multicultural vision of the French society.

Projects and Programmes
Refugee Food Festival

The Refugee Food Festival is an itinerant project led by citizens and founded by the Food Sweet Food association with the support of the UN High Committee for Refugees (UNHCR). The idea of the festival is for restaurants to open and entrust their kitchens to refugee chefs, to share tasty and united moments.

Beyond the annual festival, we are developing activities that support the professional integration of the festival’s cooks: catering services, culinary events, cooking shows, cooking workshops, conferences and testimonials.

Official documents
Development and Cultural Diversity for Reduction of Poverty and Social Inclusion

The Programme promotes the revaluation of culture, inclusion and intercultural dialogue as a means to reduce this discrimination and to break the cycle of poverty affecting these groups.