Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Media
Multicultural radio to enact cultural diversity

Australia is one of the world’s most culturally diverse nation, based largely on high levels of immigration in the second part of the 20th century. From the 1970s onwards, Australia formally recognized the massive social changes brought about by postwar immigration, and provided legislation to incorporate cultural diversity into everyday lives. One such ‘legislative’ enactment saw the establishment of multicultural broadcasting in Australia, as arguably a world-first, both in its comprehensiveness and diversity.

Today, Australia has a public sector corporation, the Special Broadcasting Service, administering five radio services in 68 languages. Also, the Community Radio sector produces multicultural programming in 100 languages through a number of its 330 broadcast and 207 narrowcast stations.

This article examines the relationship between radio and its communities. It argues that despite the ‘profile’ of SBS television, radio is much closer to its constituent communities, and therefore plays a greater role in enabling those communities to speak their own histories, beyond the confines of a consensual Anglophile paradigm.

Media
Stories of refugees, by the refugees

'3CR community radio provides a media space enabling progressive communities to voice ideas and build their power to create social change' (statement of purpose, 2016).

Refugee Radio features ten refugees and asylum seekers on their journey to a new land. They share the struggle of leaving family and the familiar behind, of learning a new language yet maintaining their culture, and of needing ways to contribute to Australian society. 

Refugee Radio was part of Human Rights Day 10 December 2010 special programming and is supported by the City of Melbourne and the Victorian Multicultural Commission.

Publications
The role of media to protect cultural identity and diversity

The state creates the conditions, at multiple levels, that guarantee the freedom and quality of the media, the public’s access to it, and diversity of opinion. In Germany, responsibility for media affairs lies principally with the Länder. The Federal Government, however, has legislative powers in specific areas such as telecommunications and copyright. The “Federal Government Report on Media and Communications” (2008) summarizes the Germany’s federal media policy.

Broadcast media, including radio, serve to protect cultural identity as well as diversity and freedom of opinion. The Interstate Broadcasting Agreement of the Länder requires that both private and public broadcasting companies represent diversity through informational, cultural and educational programming. Public broadcasting companies have a particular responsibility for safeguarding cultural identity and cultural memory. Cultural and educational programming is a mainstay of public broadcasters. Statutory rules governing broadcasting and tele-media must be developed further in light of the new digital possibilities and in accordance with EU guidelines.

Media
Conflict-Sensitive Reporting and Intercultural Dialogue

The UNESCO Crossings Institute for Conflict-Sensitive Reporting and Intercultural Dialogue has been launched at the University of Oregon in 2013.

Working from curricula developed by UNESCO and the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication, Crossings Institute training in conflict sensitive reporting begins with acknowledgement that conflict is a critical element of most news reporting. Learning to report on conflict with a point of view oriented to what may be a solution rather than a simplistic who-wins-and-who-loses perspective can result in informative and constructive journalism of social value.

Their website works like a radio station, offering to the audience a great variety of radio podcasts and intercultural conversations. on  Professor and Crossings Senior Research Fellow Chris Chavez recently attended a UNESCO Conference on reporting in Nairobi, Kenya. Research fellow Emerson Malone spoke with Chavez on the role journalists can play when reporting conflict-sensitive subjects such as immigration, tribal and religious conflicts in the area.

Media
Radio's impact in Peace Building Process in South Asia

'It is widely accepted that radio is a powerful electronic mass media having a magic power to reach even the remotest area with necessary information, education, entertainment and persuasion.

Radio is a very powerful tool of communication having ability to reach the remote areas even where there is no electricity. Radio is also very useful in the South Asian region to those who are deprived of the light of education. As radio messages are delivered with dialogue, music, words and sentences, they can be easily communicable and understandable to the people who can’t read or write. To reach the grassroots level, the Community Radio (CR) can play effective role.'

Read more of Sheikh Mohammad Shafiul Islam's article about Radio's impact in Peace Building Process in South Asiaby clicking to open the resource!

Media
Participatory radio for community development

AMARC is an international non-governmental organization serving the community radio movement, with almost 4 000 members and associates in 150 countries.

Its goal is to support and contribute to the development of community and participatory radio along with the principals of solidarity and international cooperation.

Projects and Programmes
Creating spaces of dialogue for mutual understanding and trust

'Fostering a grassroots movement of understanding, nonviolence, and transformation among Israelis and Palestinians.'

By encouraging direct contact and deep communication between local communities, ROOTS has seen transformation: stereotypes are replaced by an understanding of the other’s humanity, suffering, needs and roots. This greatly reduces fear and creates appreciation and support for each other. This groundwork of trust, safety and understanding is the foundation of any political solution. The transformation undergone by those who have engaged with Roots has led them from apathy and frustration to responsibility and involvement.

ROOTS runs dialogue groups at least once a week between members of local communities. Aware of the fact that there is great disagreement over many issues - over the facts of the past and the reality of the present; ROOTS has found that effective dialogue is the secure place for argument, and leads to deeper understanding. It is in this space that solutions can be built and actions can be developed.

Projects and Programmes
Traditional knowledge to tackle contemporary issues

How can traditional know-how and knowledge contribute to tackle the issues of the modern world? RISE UBUNTU Network aims to connect with Indigenous groups from the North, South, East, West and the Diasporas. Their objective is about preserving and recovering endangered indigenous traditions and ecosystems, notably to bring solutions to contemporary challenges.

Projects and Programmes
Intercultural dialogue to protect a shared environmental heritage

EcoPeace Middle East is a unique organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian, and Israeli environmentalists. Our primary objective is the promotion of cooperative efforts to protect our shared environmental heritage. In so doing, they seek to advance both sustainable regional development and the creation of necessary conditions for lasting peace in our region. EcoPeace has offices in Amman, Ramallah, and Tel-Aviv.

Courses / trainings
Indigenous Studies Portal

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond. This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to nearly 50,000 items.