Focus area
Purpose
Source
Type
Courses / trainings
Intercultural collaboration in academia thanks to a Diaspora Fellowship Program

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue?

The Institute of International Education (IIE), founded in 1919 (USA). IIE manages a wide offer of intercultural collaboration programs across institutions of higher education, with a worldwide reach. The Institute also dedicates specific efforts to assist scholars, students and artists threatened by conflict and unrest in their home countries.

What is this initiative about ?

The Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program facilitates engagement between scholars born in Africa who are now based in the United States or Canada and scholars in Africa on mutually beneficial academic activities. Managed by IIE, in collaboration with the United States International University-Africa in Nairobi, higher education institutions based in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda are involved in this program. A total of 390 African Diaspora Fellowships have been awarded for scholars to travel to Africa since the program’s inception in 2013.

How is this initiative a good practice of intercultural dialogue? What challenge(s) does it tackle ? What is at stake?

Each person’s vision and references are based on a variety of elements, including their cultural background (systems of value, spiritual beliefs, traditions, etc.). The participants of the program (the fellow and the host) may have cultural references in common, but as they have evolved in different environments, working together gives a unique opportunity to shape new ideas and recommendations, with the exchange of perspectives and skills at the heart the entire process. 

Courses / trainings
Building Bridges in Conflict Areas

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities to support organisations and National Agencies (NAs) within the frame of the European Commission's Erasmus+ Youth programme and beyond.

What is this good practice about ?

Conflicts, clashes, fights, and misunderstandings all influence young people all around Europe. In this report, you are invited to an overview of the methods, theories, and tools for a better understanding of conflict resolution.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

Throughout this booklet, SALTO-YOUTH raises the following questions: How to encourage young people and create a safe atmosphere for non-formal learning in places, such as suburbs of Paris or towns and villages of so-called disputed territories in South-East Europe (e.g. Kosovo) and in Eastern Europe and Caucasus (e.g. South Ossetia)? How to help young people overcome clashes and intolerance in migrant societies of Spain, Denmark, or Russia? What kind of activities should we undertake to let young people from different sides of conflict interact?

Courses / trainings
Empowerment of young ethnic minority women while respecting their cultural background

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

Empowerment means ensuring that individuals have the capacity and opportunity to equip themselves with the skills and knowledge necessary to make informed life choices. With this in mind this resource is designed to help create a greater understanding of the theory and practice of empowering young ethnic minority women and to enable the reader to share that knowledge and understanding with those who would question its benefits and potential.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

Empowerment is a concept that cannot be imposed, no matter how fair and universal we believe it is. When it comes to ethnic minority women, there are very specific cultural, identity, traditions, codes to be aware of, in order to manage to engage with them efficiently. This resources gives away keys to open doors, that are more subtle to open than one may think.

Courses / trainings
Images in Action - Break down stereotypes!

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

Quite a lot of people have prejudices about inclusion groups. This takes away the opportunities of the young people without even giving them a chance. SALTO-YOUTH hopes this booklet inspires youth workers accross Europe to create greater acceptance of people who are different, to build a better image for them amongst the general public. Combating these negative images is part of youth and inclusion work. This booklet aims to give youth workers practical tools and tips to improve the image of their target group. This way, they create greater acceptance of the young people in question, which will contribute to their inclusion in society.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

It provides a great diversity of ideas in order to break down stereotypes and to deconstruct prejudice. It enables to tackle how images, stereotypes and prejudice function, where they come from and how to influence them in a positive way; how to plan an image-building campaign; how to involve the young people from your organisation in your image-building campaign...

Courses / trainings
Value the Difference - A Resource Pack by SALTO-YOUTH

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

There are more than 508 million people in Europe, each one an individual with a different background and life experiences. This resource pack explores the topic of cultural diversity and many of the related and complex issues people in Europe face today, so together we can embrace and celebrate each one of those differences.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

It is designed as a starting point for exploration of cultural diversity by youth workers (or anyone who works with young people). The resource pack contains nine chapters, each offering background information, case studies and practical examples of how to engage young people, in the framework of a diversity of topics: Media, Migration and Cultural Diversity, Asylum Seekers and Refugees, Mediation, Cross Community, Identity, Intercultural Competence...

Courses / trainings
Intercultural competences: a diversity of challenges for networks of trainers

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

The Swiss national organisation of the Society for Intercultural Education, Training And Research (SIETAR). SIETAR Switzerland manages a community of over a hundred corporate and individual members including universities, NGOs, intercultural trainers, coaches and academics. Each member has a specific expertise to provide tailored trainings in a variety of contexts / challenges, where specific knowledge of cultural codes and intercultural competences are key for successful outcomes. 

What is this good practice about ?

SIETAR Switzerland organizes a regular program of training sessions, webinars and conferences, tackling a great diversity of topics where intercultural dialogue is central. From a discussion focused on the management of religious diversity at work to the presentation of innovative tools to update a practitioner’s set of methodologies, this page of events provides both experts and the general public a great source of capacity-building activities as well as a dynamic hub of knowledge exchange.

How does this stakeholder contribute to intercultural dialogue?

SIETAR Switzerland equips a variety of audiences with intercultural competences. Some examples: collaborating with managers to develop their cultural intelligence and help them better manage cultural diversity in the workplace; working with professionals who conduct mentorship programs with refugees, to facilitate a mutual engagement; embedding intercultural competences in students to prepare them for global professional roles and to be responsible global citizens; preparing individuals for a diplomatic career or in international co-operation

Courses / trainings
The Sky is the Limit - An Interactive Guide for Youth Projects on Interfaith Dialogue

Who leads this initiative of intercultural dialogue ?

SALTO-YOUTH (Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth) works within the Erasmus+ Youth programme, the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport.  As part of the European Commission's Training Strategy, SALTO-YOUTH provides non-formal learning resources for youth workers and youth leaders, and organises training and contact-making activities.

What is this good practice about ?

Interfaith Dialogue is not only for ‘religious people’; everybody can participate. This interactive guide will take youth workers on a journey through faith, belief, and how to build projects to encompass different perspectives in your youth & community projects.

How does this initiative contribute to intercultural dialogue?

This guide provides you a series of tangible elements to conduct an interfaith dialogue. It contains an introduction to faith and interfaith dialogue, interactive exercises to stimulate reflection and planning, case studies, best practice, and methods from other interfaith projects, approaches and practical tips on how to facilitate dialogue ...

Projects and Programmes
Recipes for harmony

Cultural Infusion has created an eBook for primary students to celebrate Australia’s cultural diversity: discover Recipes for harmony!

This resource that includes stories of Australians from a lot of different cultural backgrounds. Developed for the Australian Government Department of Social Services and the Scanlon Foundation to coincide with the 2015 Harmony Day and A Taste of Harmony celebrations, Recipes for Harmony is accompanied by a website with a comprehensive education resource guide with videos, audio and hours of classroom activities.

Discover a unique way to educate students on cultures from across the globe with personal stories, recipes, cultural profiles, language tools and videos !

 

Media
Exploring the complicated world of cultural identity

Join the journey suggested by CBC Radio (Canada), that looks at cultural identity and how Indigenous people see themselves in a world that wants to paint them all with one brush. As you might have guessed, identity is a complicated and touchy issue in a lot of Indigenous communities.

Christi Belcourt's own identity often spills out as paint. The award winning artist is Michif and calls Lac Ste. Anne, Alta., home. She tells the story behind a powerful self-portrait that she created after being told she should not be allowed to apply for funding because she was not Indigenous enough.

Amanda Rheaume is a Métis musician based in Ottawa with a very rich family history. And the more she dug into those stories, the more she was inspired to write about her heritage. 

Oscar Baker III grew up in two very different communities. His mother is Mi'kmaq from Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick. His father is black and his hometown is St. Augustine, Florida. He was surrounded by addiction, violence and poverty. As an angry teenager he drank and looked for trouble on the streets of St. Augustine. Eventually, it would threaten to swallow his life whole. But Oscar saw an opportunity and made a life-changing decision.

Unreserved's own Kim Wheeler shares what it was like to grow up in an adopted family outside of her culture and how she found her way back. She is Mohawk and Anishinabe and was adopted out as part of the ;60s scoop or the Adopt an Indian or Métis Child program. As part of an assimilation policy the federal government took thousands of Indigenous children from their families, often without consent. 

Media
Radio stories of rural women from across the globe

In line with the theme of the 62nd session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (12 – 23 March 2018), “Challenges and opportunities in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of rural women and girls” and in collaboration with the World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC), UN Women brings to life stories of rural women from around the world, from Haiti and Canada to Iraq and Senegal to the pacific islands of Fiji. Produced largely by women producers, these stories, told in the first-person narrative, are currently being aired on local community radio stations.