Introducing new agricultural practices into a rural community

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© UNESCO

Ethiopia has Africa’s highest number of sheep and cattle. Its rapidly increasing population will soon exceed 90 million people. Nomadic grazing has become a major cause of the degradation of soil quality and erosion, threatening biodiversity. In the Lake Tana region, at the source of the Nile, the Ethiopian State and the IFAD have implemented a natural resources protection programme introducing new agrarian practices to 27 districts. This has benefited everyone, especially Bitenesh, a single mother who makes her living out of 3cows, 4 goats and 1 donkey.

Main Educational Interventions:

  • Promoting awareness of the dangers of desertification among communities by travelling to erosion-affected arid zones in the east of the country.
  • Training villagers in techniques enabling the preservation of fodder growing areas and communal forests.
  • The introduction of alternative income-generating activities for inhabitants that promote biodiversity, for example, apiculture
Theme: 
Biodiversity
Education
Environment
Forests and Desertification
Knowledge Transmission
Level of education: 
Wider public
Non-formal education
Adults
Countries: 
Ethiopia