Quadrennial Periodic Report
European Union 2021

Quadrennial Periodic Report - N Robinson - 05/07/2021 - 10:29

General Information

Technical Information

Name of Party: 
European Union
Date of Ratification: 
2006
Officially Designated Point of Contact of the Convention: 

QPR Stakeholder

Title: 
Ms.
Address: 
Catherine Magnant
European Commission
Head of Unit, Cultural Policy, Directorate-General Education, Youth, Sport & Culture
J70 02/232
1049 Brussels
Belgium
Phone Number: 
+3222991111
Email: 
eac-unite-d1@ec.europa.eu
Describe the multi-stakeholder consultation process established for the preparation of this report, including consultations with relevant ministries, public institutions, local governments and civil society organizations.: 

The implementation of the Convention and the preparation of this report has been discussed among EU Member State representatives in Brussels and Paris, European External Action Service (EEAS) interservice meetings on UNESCO, and the European Commission (EC) Inter Service Group on Culture. This Inter Service Group is attended by up to 20 different Directorates General in policy areas including digital, development cooperation, research, enterprise, taxation and statistics.

This report is a factual description of relevant measures taken in the reporting period. Civil society and cultural and creative organizations have been consulted on the measures themselves, including through the EC’s Structured Dialogue with the cultural sector (Voices of Culture), European Networks and Platforms, Music Moves Europe dialogues and European Creative Hubs Network (funded under Creative Europe). For more details see the section on civil society, and sections in each of the measures questionnaires on NGO and private sector involvement.

The EC actively seeks to hear and discuss the ideas of multiple stakeholders in policy-making. The primary means of doing this is public consultations, via the European Commission’s “Have your say” website https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better-regulation/have-your-say_en. This currently shows hundreds of open and recent feedback opportunities on EU policy developments relevant to culture, digital, trade, copyright and cooperation with international partners. The EC has also organized many stakeholder meetings and events which have informed the measures within this report; these are described in the civil society section and under other individual measures.

With regard to statistical data, there are many statistics relating to culture available at EU level, including in relation to the diversity of cultural expressions. However, not all are available in the format required in this questionnaire. For this reason we have not attempted to complete the statistical questions in the UNESCO form, and are instead submitting in annex the 2019 Eurostat publication on Culture Statistics, also available online here: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-statistical-books/-/ks-01-19-712). This publication presents comprehensive data, with accompanying methodological explanations, for the EU and its Member States in relation to cultural employment, cultural enterprises, international trade in cultural goods, cultural participation, use of ICT for cultural purposes and private cultural expenditure. These include harmonized data on:

- employment in the EU Member States, including in cultural businesses. More recent (annual) data by domain are publicly available in Eurobase: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/main/data/database - Database by theme/Population and social conditions/Culture and analysed in ‘Statistics explained’ articles on https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Culture .

- ICT use by individuals in the EU Member States. More recent (annual) data are publicly available in Eurobase: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/main/data/database - Database by theme/Population and social conditions/Culture and analysed in ‘Statistics explained’ article on https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Culture .

- international trade in cultural goods. More recent (annual) data are publicly available in Eurobase: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/main/data/database - Database by theme/Population and social conditions/Culture and analysed in ‘Statistics explained’ article on https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Culture . On the value of direct foreign investment in creative and cultural industries, such data are not available at EU level, only at national level.

- cultural participation (by different social variables, including sex) in the EU Member States The most important data source here is the EU-SILC (Survey on Income and living conditions) and its ad hoc module on cultural participation.

Since all EU Member States are Parties to the Convention in their own right, relevant national statistics should also be available in their individual periodic reports.

Executive summary: 

From 2017-2021 the European Union (EU) has continued actively to implement the 2005 Convention across a range of policies, to promote and protect the diversity of cultural expressions. This report is a factual account of relevant EU initiatives during the reporting period.

It describes over 50 EU measures, including five implemented directly with UNESCO in international partner countries, also Parties to the Convention. Worth over $26m in total, these are the EU-UNESCO Expert Facility - renewed in 2019, which has now supported implementation of the Convention in 25 countries across all 5 UNESCO Regions; Culture|2030 Indicators; ACP-EU Culture and Transcultura programmes in the Caribbean, and the Silk Road Heritage Corridors.

During the reporting period, the EU’s main objectives and priorities under each goal of the Convention have been:

- sustainable systems of governance for culture: boosting support to Europe’s cultural & creative sectors, including through a 63% increase to the Creative Europe programme budget, and legislating for a more diverse audiovisual landscape and fairer marketplace for online content and creators, through revisions to the Audio Visual Media Services and Copyright Directives

- balanced flows of cultural goods and services and increased mobility of artists: promoting artists’ mobility through a new grant scheme i-Portunus in 41 European countries, and support for sectoral initiatives targeting cross-border circulation of repertoire and artists within the EU and with third countries, for instance in the field of music,

- integrating culture in sustainable development: strengthening EU political commitment to the cultural dimension of sustainable development through a Council Resolution in 2019 and working group of EU Member States, and dedicating over EUR 95 million of EU programme support in partner countries to culture, CCIs and implementation of the 2005 Convention.

- promoting human rights and fundamental freedoms: through a new EU Gender Equality Strategy, policy and CSO collaboration on culture and gender equality, status and working conditions of artists and artistic freedom, and continued monitoring and evaluation of media pluralism in the EU.

The two main challenges over the past four years, for the EU and no doubt for other Parties, have been the pace and scope of cultural content digitisation and organizational digitalisation, and the unprecedented impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cultural and creative sectors. Articulating the aims of the Convention also remains challenging, as its breadth and depth is still poorly understood. As the only UNESCO Convention to which the EU is a Party, for the Commission the 2005 Convention demonstrates the importance of UNESCO’s standard-setting role. The EU continues consistently to promote the Convention, to ensure the diversity of cultural expressions remains valued, both intrinsically and economically.

Next steps for EU implementation of the Convention are a matter for future EU political decision-making. Priorities already announced for 2021-25 include supporting EU Member States and cultural and creative sectors in recovery from the pandemic and resilience in rebuilding, defining a new Work Plan for Culture from 2023 onwards, and giving effect to new EU policy collaboration initiatives on culture and sustainable development, the status and working conditions of artists, and artistic freedom. This will be done inter alia in the framework of the EU’s Working Better Together – Team Europe approach, through which EU institutions, Member States and UNESCO are starting work to shape and prioritise collaboration, including in the field of culture.

Contact details of the stakeholders involved in the preparation of the quadrennial periodic report (QPR). Please also include the contact details of the civil society organizations (CSOs) if they have contributed to the QPR drafting, including through the CSO form.: 

Goal 1 - Support Sustainable Systems of Governance for Culture

Cultural and Creative Sectors

A Ministry (or agency with ministerial status) is responsible for cultural and creative sectors: 
YES
Regional, provincial or local governments or administrations have decentralised responsibilities for policies and measures promoting the cultural and creative sectors:: 
YES
Regulatory frameworks and sector specific laws, policies and/or strategies supporting the cultural and creative industries have been revised or adopted during the last 4 years: 
YES
If YES, has at least one of them been designed through interministerial cooperation (involving different government departments responsible for policy areas, such as communication, education, ICT, trade, foreign affairs, labor, finance): 
YES
Specific education and training programmes in the arts and the cultural and creative sectors are established, including: 
Digital literacy programmes for creation and experimentation
Technical and vocational education and training programmes in
Specific measures and programmes have been implemented over the last 4 years to: 
Support job creation in the cultural and creative sectors
Encourage the formalization and growth of micro/small and medium-sized cultural enterprises
Statistical offices or research bodies have produced data during the last 4 years: 
related to cultural and creative sectors
evaluating cultural policies
Please provide whenever possible disaggregated data by sector: 
Please see annex, Culture Statistics - 2019 edition, published by Eurostat, the Statistical Office of the European Union (https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-statistical-books/-/ks-01-19-712).
Please provide whenever possible disaggregated data by sector, age, sex and type of employment: 
Employment statistics for cultural and creative sectors in EU Member States during the reporting period are set out in the annex, Culture Statistics - 2019 edition, published by Eurostat, the Statistical Office of the European Union. https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-statistical-books/-/ks-01-19-712. More recent (annual) data by domain are publicly available in Eurobase: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/main/data/database - Database by theme/Population and social conditions/Culture and analysed in ‘Statistics explained’ articles on https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Culture .
Please provide whenever possible the share allocated by cultural sectors/domains (in %): 
Please see annex, Culture Statistics - 2019 edition, published by Eurostat, the Statistical Office of the European Union (https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-statistical-books/-/ks-01-19-712).
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

New European Agenda for Culture

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In 2018 the Commission adopted a New European Agenda for Culture, to reflect the evolution of the cultural sectors since the 2007 European Agenda for Culture, and to respond to 2017 calls from the Leaders of the EU27 for “a Union where citizens have new opportunities for cultural and social development and economic growth, a Union which preserves our cultural heritage and promotes cultural diversity”. The New European Agenda for Culture Communication COM (2018) 267 and its accompanying Staff Working Document provide the framework for cooperation on culture at the EU level. The New European Agenda has three strategic objectives: - Social dimension – harnessing the power of culture and cultural diversity for social cohesion and well-being - Economic dimension – supporting culture-based creativity in education and innovation, and for jobs and growth - External dimension – strengthening international cultural relations. These focus on the positive contribution that culture brings to Europe’s society, its economy and international relations. The Agenda also sets out enhanced working methods with Member States, civil society organisations and international partners. The New European Agenda for Culture includes three references to the UNESCO 2005 Convention including a commitment from the European Commission and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy to support the implementation of the Convention in African, Caribbean and Pacific countries through the 11th European Development Fund Intra-ACP culture programme (described separately in this report).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Work Plan for Culture 2015-2018

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Council of the European Union, European Commission, EU Member States
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
EU Member States define their priorities for cultural policy making at EU level in multi-annual Work Plans for Culture adopted through conclusions of the Council of the European Union. Two Work Plans were in place during the period covered by this report. This section describes the 2015-18 Work Plan for Culture https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/GA/TXT/?uri=CELEX:52014XG1223(02).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Outputs during reporting period (ie since 2017), listed by Work Plan for Culture priorities: 2015-18 Work Plan for Culture A. Accessible and inclusive culture Council Conclusions: Promoting access to culture via digital means (November 2017) Open Method of Coordination (OMC) working group of Member States’ experts: Contribution of culture to social inclusion (2017-2018) Study on audience development - How to place audiences at the centre of cultural organisations (2017) B. Cultural heritage Council Conclusions: The need to bring cultural heritage to the fore across policies in the EU (May 2018) OMC working group: Skills, training and knowledge transfer: Traditional and emerging heritage professions (2017-2018) Study: Risk assessment and prevention for safeguarding cultural heritage from the effects of natural disasters and threats caused by human action (2018) C. Cultural and creative sectors: creative economy and innovation OMC working group: Sustainable cultural tourism. D. Promotion of cultural diversity, culture in EU external relations and mobility Council Conclusions: EU strategic approach to international cultural relations (April 2019) https://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2019/04/08/international-cultural-relations-council-adopts-conclusions/ Friends of the Presidency Group (2017-2018) Ad-hoc task group on culture and development cooperation (2017-18) https://eenca.com/index.cfm/publications/mapping-of-eu-funding-for-culture-in-the-enp/
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The European Commission surveyed Member States and produced a report on implementation of the Work Plan for the Council Cultural Affairs Committee. Some findings from the survey were published in the context of the New European Agenda for Culture: https://ec.europa.eu/culture/document/new-european-agenda-culture-swd2018-267-final
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
All EU Member States
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Work Plan for Culture 2019-2022

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Council of the European Union, European Commission, EU Member States
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
EU Member States define their priorities for cultural policy making at EU level in multi-annual Work Plans for Culture adopted through conclusions of the Council of the European Union. Two Work Plans were in place during the period covered by this report. This section describes the 2019-22 Work Plan for Culture, published here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:52018XG1221(01), and its amendment in 2020 available here: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2020.193.01.0020.01.ENG The 2019-2022 Work Plan for Culture defines six priority areas (A-F) for action (originally five, to which a sixth – sustainable development - was proposed in a Council Resolution of November 2019 and formally added in May 2020 A) Sustainability in Cultural Heritage B) Cohesion and well-being C) An ecosystem supporting artists, cultural and creative professionals and European content D) Gender equality E) International cultural relations F) Cultural dimension of sustainable development In addition, digitalisation and cultural statistics remain important cross-sectorial issues for the Work Plan.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Outputs during reporting period (ie 2019-21), listed by Work Plan for Culture priorities: For each priority, the Work Plan identified a number of topics and related actions, as a dynamic rolling agenda. There are 18 topics in total, with actions defined for EU Member States, the Commission, the Presidency of the Council or another interested Member State. The topics most relevant to the UNESCO 2005 Convention are the following (listed under each WP Priority) B) Cohesion and well-being: Social cohesion, Understanding digital audiences, Young creative generations, Citizenship, values and democracy. C) An ecosystem supporting artists, cultural and creative professionals and European content: Status and working conditions of artists, artistic freedom, audiovisual coproductions, music, multilingualism and translation, financing and innovation. D) Gender equality: gender equality. E) International cultural relations: strategic approach F) Cultural as a driver for sustainable development: cultural dimension of sustainable development. There are 7 main working methods, under which there are 27 activities planned from 2019-2022 as follows: Open Method of Coordination (OMC) working groups (8 groups in total), Conferences (10) Peer-learning projects (2, combined into 1) Studies (3) Workshops (5, combined into 3) Stock-taking seminars (2, combined into 1) Expert group (1). Following the dynamic agenda established by the Work Plan, with technical work preceding (e.g. studies, workshops), the Council adopted conclusions in the following fields: - Young creative generations, adopted in May 2019, under the Romanian Presidency https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-8804-2019-INIT/en/pdf - Improving the cross-border circulation of European audiovisual works, adopted in May 2019, under the Romanian Presidency EUR-Lex - 52019XG0607(02) - EN - EUR-Lex (europa.eu) - EU strategic approach on international cultural relations, adopted in April 2019 by the General Affairs Council, under the Romanian Presidency pdf9 (europa.eu) The implementation of the Work Plan actions, under different priorities, further informed the work of the Council in the following fields: - Council resolution on the cultural dimension of sustainable development, adopted in November 2019, under the Finnish Presidency EUR-Lex - 42019Y1206(01) - EN - EUR-Lex (europa.eu) - Council conclusions on risk management in the area of cultural heritage, adopted in May 2020, under the Croatian Presidency https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2020.186.01.0001.01.ENG - Council conclusions amending the Work Plan for Culture (2019-2022), adopted in May 2020, under the Croatian Presidency https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2020.193.01.0020.01.ENG - Council conclusions on media literacy in an ever-changing world, adopted in May 2020, under the Croatian Presidency https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2020.193.01.0023.01.ENG - Council conclusions on safeguarding a free and pluralistic media system, adopted in November 2020, under the German Presidency pdf (europa.eu) - Council conclusions on the recovery, resilience and sustainability of the cultural and creative sectors, adopted in May 2021, under the Portuguese Presidency st08768-en21.pdf (europa.eu) - Council conclusions on Europe’s media in the digital decade: An action plan to support recovery and transformation, adopted in May 2021, under the Portuguese Presidency st08727-en21.pdf (europa.eu)
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The Commission prepared a mid-term evaluation of the 2019-2022 Work Plan for Culture for the Council Cultural Affairs Committee in March 2021. This recognized the significant and successful efforts to transfer Work Plan activities online in light of physical and travel restrictions resulting from Covid-19, and that while discussions on the next Work Plan for Culture are yet to begin, the recovery and resilience of the cultural and creative sectors should be prioritized.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
EU Member States, European Commission
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Creative Europe 2014-2020 – Culture sub-programme and Cross-sectoral strand

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
European Education & Culture Executive Agency
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Creative Europe is the European Union's framework programme for support to the cultural and creative sectors. The programme is structured around two independent sub-programmes for Culture (described here), Media (described under Goal 1.2 – Media Diversity), and a cross sectoral strand (described below). The Programme is complementary to actions at national level in the field of culture and the audiovisual sector, reflecting the policy priorities the EU is following in the cultural and creative field. Creative Europe is open to cultural and creative organisations from EU Member States, as well as, under certain conditions, to some non-EU Member States. During the reporting period, Creative Europe included 33 participating countries, from Norway to Tunisia, from Ukraine to the Balkan region. Participation in the MEDIA programme is subject to alignment with Directive 2010/13/EU (Audiovisual Media Services Directive – AVMSD). The Culture sub-programme covers culture sector initiatives such as those promoting cross-border cooperation, platforms, networking, and literary translations. A cross-sectoral strand, addressed to all cultural and creative sectors, which includes a Guarantee Facility, supports transnational policy cooperation. This strand also provides support for Creative Europe Desks in all participating countries, in order to reach out to stakeholders
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In the reporting period (2017-2021) projects particularly relevant to the Convention, in the fields of digital environment and governance, included: European Composer & Songwriter Alliance Network, Opera Vision, European Opera Digital Project, Set the Trend! RESHAPE - Reflect, Share, Practice, Experiment Regional Lab: New Culture Spaces and Networks as drivers of an Innovative and Sustainable Bottom-up Development of Regional Collaboration Collective Moves: Libertalia lab and performance Shared Cities: Creative Momentum The Sphere Cultures for Resilience Blockchain My Art Colab quarter The New Networked Normal CATHEXIS: Innovating Theatre as Event: The Spectator as Researcher • Two booklets are annexed to this report with details of these projects. Details of all projects funded by Creative Europe are available (and searchable) here: https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/creative-europe/projects/
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
1.74 billion USD 2014-2020 for whole Creative Europe programme (Culture, Media and Cross-Sectoral).
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Mid-term evaluation Public consultation (2017) https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/creative-europe/consultations_en Report by the European Commission (2018): https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?qid=1525096559278&uri=COM%3A2018%3A248%3AFIN External Evaluation report (2018): https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/90b7f456-af71-11e8-99ee-01aa75ed71a1
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Cultural and creative sector organizations
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Creative Europe Desks (in each participating country) https://ec.europa.eu/culture/resources/creative-europe-desks
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Creative Europe 2021-2027

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission European Education & Culture Executive Agency
European Education & Culture Executive Agency
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Creative Europe is the European Commission's flagship programme for support to the culture and audiovisual sectors. The Creative Europe programme 2021-2027 invests in actions that reinforce cultural diversity and respond to the needs and challenges of the cultural and creative sectors. The programme is structured around three strands: - The CULTURE strand covers cultural and creative sector initiatives such as those promoting cross-border cooperation, platforms, networking, and literary translations. - The MEDIA strand supports and promotes Europe's audiovisual sector. - The CROSS-SECTORAL strand aims at exploiting the potential for collaboration between different the two sectors, as well as addressing the common challenges they face. The Programme is complementary to actions at national level in the field of culture and the audiovisual sector, reflecting the policy priorities the EU is following in the cultural and creative field. Creative Europe is open to cultural and creative organisations from EU Member States, as well as, under certain conditions, to some non-EU Member States. Participation in the MEDIA programme is subject to alignment with Directive 2010/13/EU, as amended by Directive (EU) 2018/1808 (Audiovisual Media Services Directive – AVMSD).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Creative Europe programme was launched on 26th May 2021. As of 23rd June, 21 calls have been published which will support selected projects and initiatives in the cultural and creative sector.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$ 2.90 billion
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Culture and creative sector organizations
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Creative Europe Desks in participating countries https://ec.europa.eu/culture/resources/creative-europe-desks

European Capitals of Culture

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The European Capitals of Culture (ECOC) initiative is designed to: - Highlight the richness and diversity of cultures in Europe - Celebrate the cultural features Europeans share - Increase European citizens' sense of belonging to a common cultural area - Foster the contribution of culture to the development of cities In addition to this, experience has shown that the event is an excellent opportunity for: - Regenerating cities - Raising the international profile of cities; - Enhancing the image of cities in the eyes of their own inhabitants - Breathing new life into a city's culture - Boosting tourism The initiative was developed in 1985 and has, to date, been awarded to more than 60 cities across the European Union (EU) and beyond. The 2014 Decision establishing the European Capitals of Culture for the years 2020-2033 explicitly references the UNESCO 2005 Convention, and includes outreach to young people as a factor in the assessment of cities’ applications: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.L_.2014.132.01.0001.01.ENG
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
During the reporting period the 8 designated European Capitals of Culture have been: 2017 – Aarhus (Denmark), Paphos (Cyprus) http://www.aarhus2017.dk/da/index.html http://www.pafos2017.eu/ 2018 – Leeuwarden (Netherlands), Valletta (Malta) https://www.visitleeuwarden.com/en/explore/european-capital-of-culture-2018 https://valletta2018.org/ 2019 – Matera (Italy), Plovdiv (Bulgaria) https://ec.europa.eu/culture/matera-and-plovdiv 2020 – Galway (Ireland), Rijeka (Croatia) https://ec.europa.eu/culture/galway-and-rijeka There are no 2021 European Capitals of Culture, due to COVID-19. However, the 2020 European Capitals of Culture exceptionally held their title until April 2021.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Each year until 2019 the European Commission published an evaluation report on the outcomes of the European Capitals of Culture of the previous year. For the Capitals post 2019, the cities themselves carry out their own evaluation and send it to the Commission by the end of the year following that of the title. This 2020 Brochure highlighting successful projects in recent European Capitals of Culture, shows that ECoCs have become laboratories of strategic investment in culture, benefiting economies and societies as a whole. Cultural activity in ECoCs increases, new audiences are reached, and the cities’ cultural operators acquire a more international outlook and thus improve their skills and professionalism. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1c9334a8-4c82-11ea-b8b7-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
National governments in participating countries
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
City authorities in participating countries
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Cultural and creative sector organizations in participating countries
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

EU Prize for Literature, and support for literary translations

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission / EACEA
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The European Union Prize for Literature is an annual initiative to recognise the best emerging authors in Europe. It aims to put the spotlight on the creativity and diverse wealth of Europe’s contemporary literature in the field of fiction, to promote the circulation of literature within Europe and to encourage greater interest in non-national literary works Launched by the European Commission in 2009, the prize is open to countries participating in the Creative Europe programme for the cultural and creative sectors. In its 13 editions to date, 41 countries have participated and there have been 148 winning authors. The EUPL is currently organised by a consortium consisting of the European Booksellers Federation, the European Writers' Council and the Federation of European Publishers. The Prize aims to: - showcase and put a spotlight on Europe’s diverse wealth of contemporary fiction; - raise the profile of winning authors outside their home country and help them cross borders and reach broader readership; - raise general awareness and stimulate interest in the whole book sector about the literary diversity in Europe; - promote actively the publishing, translation, selling and reading of books from other European countries; - Encourage transnational circulation of literature, both in Europe and beyond. The Creative Europe programme also supports initiatives for the translation and promotion of literary works across EU markets, with the aim of increasing access to and readership of high quality European literature. Specific support is provided to publishers or publishing houses (not individuals) for: - Translation and publication of a "package" of works of fiction from and into eligible languages - Promotion of the translated "package", including the appropriate use of digital technologies in both the distribution and promotion of the works
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Each winner of the EU Prize for Literature receives €5,000 and their books are given support for translation funding, as well as promotion. The winners during the reporting period are listed below. During the reporting period there have been two calls for proposals for literary translation projects – EACEA/13/2018 in 2018, and CREAT-CULT-2021-LIT in 2021 (deadline 30 September 2021, details here: Funding & tenders (europa.eu)). 2017 EUPL winners Albania: Rudi Erebara, Epika e yjeve të mëngjesit (The Epic of the Morning Stars), 2016 [12] Bulgaria: Ina Vultchanova, Остров Крах (The Crack-Up Island), 2016 [13] Czech Republic: Bianca Bellová, Jezero (The Lake), 2016 [14] Greece: Kallia Papadaki, Δενδρίτες (Dendrites), 2015 [15] Iceland: Halldóra K. Thoroddsen, Tvöfalt gler (Double Glazing), 2016 [16] Latvia: Osvalds Zebris, Gaiļu kalna ēnā (In the Shadow of Rooster Hill), 2014 [17][18] Malta: Walid Nabhan, L-Eżodu taċ-Ċikonji (Exodus of Storks), 2013[19] Montenegro: Aleksandar Bečanović, Arcueil (Arcueil), 2015 [20] Netherlands: Jamal Ouariachi, Een Honger (A hunger), 2015 [21] Serbia: Darko Tuševljaković, Jaz (The Chasm), 2016 [22] Turkey: Sine Ergün, Baştankara (Chickadee), 2016 [23] United Kingdom: Sunjeev Sahota, The Year of the Runaways, 2015 [24] 2019 winners Austria: Laura Freudenthaler, Geistergeschichte (A ghost story) Finland: Piia Leino, Taivas (Heaven) France: Sophie Daull, Au grand lavoir (The Wash-house) Hungary: Réka Mán-Várhegyi, Mágneshegy (Magnetic Hill) Georgia: Beqa Adamashvili, პროლოგი (Everybody dies in this novel) Greece: Nikos Chryssos, Καινούργια μέρα (New Day) Ireland: Jan Carson, The Firestarters Italy: Giovanni Dozzini, E Baboucar guidava la fila (And Baboucar was leading the line) Lithuania: Daina Opolskaite, DIENŲ PIRAMIDĖS (The Hour of Dusk) Poland: Marta Dzido, Frajda (Pleasure) Romania: Tatiana Țîbuleac, Grădina de sticlă (The Glass Garden) Slovakia: Ivana Dobrakovová, Matky a kamionisti (Mothers and Lorry Drivers) Ukraine: Halya Shyyan, ЗА СПИНОЮ (Behind the back) United Kingdom: Melissa Harrison, All Among the Barley 2020 winners Belgium: Nathalie Skowronek, La carte des regrets (The map of regrets) Bosnia and Herzegovina: Lana Bastašić, Uhvati zeca (Catch the rabbit) Croatia: Maša Kolanović, Poštovani kukci i druge jezive priče (Dear insects and other scary stories) Cyprus: Σταύρος Χριστοδούλου (Stavros Christodoulou), Τη μέρα που πάγωσε ο ποταμός (The day the river froze) Denmark: Asta Olivia Nordenhof, 'Penge på lommen' (Money in your pocket) Estonia: Mudlum (Made Luiga), Poola poisid (Polish boys) Germany: Matthias Nawrat, Der traurige Gast (The Sad Guest) Kosovo: Shpëtim Selmani, Libërthi i dashurisë (The Booklet of Love) Luxembourg: Francis Kirps, Die Mutationen (The Mutations) Montenegro: Stefan Bošković, Ministar (Minister) North Macedonia: Петар Андоновски (Petar Andonovski), Страв од варвари (Fear of barbarians) Norway: Maria Navarro Skaranger, Bok om sorg (Book of grief) Spain: Irene Solà, Canto jo i la muntanya balla (I sing and the mountain dances) 2021 winners Albania: Tom Kuka (Enkel Demi), Flama (Calamity) Armenia: Արամ Պաչյան (Aram Pachyan), P/F Bulgaria: Георги Бърдаров (Georgi Bardarov), Absolvo te Czech Republic: Lucie Faulerová [cs], Smrtholka (Deathmaiden) Iceland: Sigrún Pálsdóttir, Delluferðin (Runaround) Latvia: Laura Vinogradova, Upe (The River) Malta: Lara Calleja, Kissirtu kullimkien (You Have Destroyed Everything) Netherlands: Gerda Blees, Wij zijn licht (We are light) Portugal: Frederico Pedreira, A Lição do Sonâmbulo (The Sleepwalker Lesson) Serbia: Dejan Tiago Stanković, Zamalek Slovenia: Anja Mugerli, Čebelja družina (Bee Family) Sweden: Maxim Grigoriev, Europa (Europe) Tunisia: أمين الغزي (Amine Al Ghozzi), 2011 زندالي ليلة 14 جانفي (Zindali, the night of 14 january 2011)
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
An external Evaluation report (2018: https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/90b7f456-af71-11e8-99ee-01aa75ed71a1) found that, with regard to literature “There is a barrier to market access for publishers operating in more linguistically bound markets. This may be the reason why a disproportionate number of Central and Eastern European publishers are applying for the Literary Translation scheme to translate books originally written in English or in the other major European languages such as French, German and Spanish. With this, translation of literature from smaller into bigger languages is not promoted. The EUPL (European Union Prize for Literature) covers 38 countries and the prize winning books represent an exceptional linguistic and cultural diversity. Applications for the translation of EUPL-winning books are granted automatic points in a focussed effort to improve the visibility of literature from smaller and linguistically bound countries. This move partially achieves the aim of cultural diversity and circulation of European literature from smaller languages. However the high number of applications for the translation of EUPL-winning books has meant that applications for novels and short stories (the genre covered by EUPL) are dominant. Also, fewer publishers from the UK, France, Germany and Spain tend to include EUPL winning books in their applications and hence, publishers from these countries are less likely to be selected for grants”. The Commission took note of the points made in this 2018 evaluation and aimed to address them in subsequent Creative Europe programme support.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

Music Moves Europe Talent Awards

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
European Education and Culture Executive Agency
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
As a specific action within the EU’s Music Moves Europe initiative, the European Union seeks to highlight and promote the diversity of the European repertoire with a new European Union Prize for popular and contemporary music: The Music Moves Talent Awards. Succeeding the European Border Breakers Awards (EBBA), since 2019, the annual Music Moves Europe Talent awards celebrate emerging artists who represent the European sound of today and tomorrow. The Prize is implemented by Eurosonic Noorderslag (ESNS) in partnership with Reeperbahn Festival and co-funded by the Creative Europe programme. It gets the support of a unique alliance of European music industry partners, including: Digital Music Europe (DME), European Broadcasting Union (EBU), European Music Exporters Exchange (EMEE), Independent Music Companies Association (IMPALA), International Music Managers Forum (IMMF), The live music platform for new European talent (Liveurope), The European network of music venues and festivals (Live DMA), and European Festival Association (Yourope). Europe’s vibrant and diverse music scene has to compete against a dominant Anglo-American music industry. With the Music Moves Europe Talent Awards, the European Commission aims to put a spotlight on the most interesting new European talents – and to showcase the richness of the European music industry. Outstanding European emerging artists will receive a Music Moves Europe Talent Award in recognition of their growing international success. They are given the opportunity to perform at the Eurosonic Festival (ESNS) and receive on top of that a prize package, including a training programme and financial support for touring and promotion. The nature of the Prize affirms a shared commitment to helping emerging artists to break through in Europe and beyond.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In 2021 each winner received a prize package worth €10,000 split into two parts: touring and promotional support, and business training. In addition they are offered a range of networking, broadcasting and recording opportunities from the live sector and recorded music industry. Winners of the Music Moves Europe Talent Awards during the reporting period have been as follows: 2021 Alyona Alyona (Ukraine, also Public Choice Award) Melenas (Spain) Louis and the Yakuza (Belgium) Julia Bardo (Italy) Inhaler (Ireland) Vilda (Finland) Sassy 009 (Norway) Rimon (Netherlands) 2020 NAAZ (Netherlands, also Public Choice Award) Meduza (Italy) girl in red (Norway) Anna Leone (Sweden) PONGO (Portugal) HARMED (Hungary) 5K HD (Austria) Flohio (UK) 2019 (all Public Choice Awards): [Pop] Bishop Briggs (UK) and Lxandra (Finland) [Rock] Pale Waves (UK) and Pip Blom (Netherlands) [Electronic] Smerz (Norway) and Stelartronic (Austria) [RnB/Urban] Rosalía (Spain) and Aya Nakamura (France) [Hip Hop/Rap] blackwave. (Belgium) and Reykjavíkurdætur (Iceland) [Singer-songwriter] Avec (Austria) and Albin Lee Meldau (Sweden)
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
1,785,000
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Eurosonic Noorderslag
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Reeperbahn Festival
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Inter-service collaboration on culture

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission (DG EAC)
European External Action Service (EEAS)
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Within the European Commission, the Directorate General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture (DG EAC) regularly convenes meetings of an Inter Service Group on Culture with other Directorates General. DG EAC also contributes regularly to inter-service consultations on draft EU legislation, policies and programmes impacting the cultural and creative sectors and the diversity of cultural expressions. The European External Action Services also convenes inter-service meetings in relation to UNESCO, in which DG EAC, INTPA and other Commission services have participated.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
During the reporting period (2017-2021) 6 meetings of the Commission’s Inter Service Group on Culture have been held, and +/- 20 Commission services have been represented. Preparation and follow-up of the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage has been a key focus of these internal meetings during the reporting period. Other topics addressed (relevant to the 2005 Convention) have included: EU reporting under the 2005 Convention Sustainable Development Goals Culture in EU external relations Funding opportunities for cultural and creative sectors Culture projects in urban, rural and coastal areas Regional cultural projects and cultural routes Sustainable cultural tourism Culture in education and research Curating digital cultural resources Linguistic diversity (European Day of Languages)
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Media Diversity

Public service media has a legal or statutory remit to promote a diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Policies and measures promote content diversity in programming by supporting: 
Regional and/or local broadcasters
Linguistic diversity in media programming
Domestic content regulations for audio-visual media exist (e.g. quotas for production or distribution requirements for national films, TV series or music on radio): 
YES
Regulatory authority(ies) monitoring media exist: 
YES
If YES, please provide the name and year of establishment of the regulatory authority(ies): 
-
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) monitor: 
-
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) are responsible for: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Media Pluralism Monitor

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Centre for Media Pluralism and Media Freedom (independent but funded by the European Commission)
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Measuring and monitoring risks to media pluralism and freedom including in the area of ‘social inclusiveness’
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Regular comparative monitoring of media pluralism and freedom in each EU Member State
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$1 190 000 in 2019 $1 190 000 in 2020
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Recommendations cover 4 areas: Basic Protection, Market Plurality, Political Independence, and Social Inclusiveness
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
CMPF, its network in all EU Member States and the European Commission (funding and oversight)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Audiovisual Media Services Directive

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Union, Directive (EU) 2018/1808
EU Member State governments
European Commission
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Media Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The new rules on audiovisual media in the revised AVMSD aim to create a regulatory framework fit for the digital age, leading to a safer, fairer and more diverse audiovisual landscape. The Directive creates a regulatory framework fit for the digital age, leading to a safer, fairer and more diverse audiovisual landscape. It lays down essential rules to create a level playing field for audiovisual media services, preserve cultural diversity, protect children and consumers, combat racial and religious hatred and guarantee the independence of national media regulators. It coordinates EU-wide legislation on all audiovisual media, including both traditional TV broadcasters and on-demand video services, and lays down essential protection measures with regard to content shared on video-sharing platforms. The revised AVMSD strengthens also the promotion of cultural diversity, by introducing clear obligations for on-demand services to have at least a 30% share of European content in their catalogue and to ensure the prominence of this content. These rules will contribute to a broader and more diverse offer of AV content for Europeans and will have a positive impact on cultural diversity and create more opportunities for European creators and AV industry. The Commission has produced guidelines to facilitate the implementation of this obligation. The AVMSD includes specific measures to protect minors. In order to protect them from harmful content online, the Directive requires video-sharing platforms to put in place certain measures, including establishing and operating age verification systems, with respect to content which may impair the physical, mental or moral development of minors. The Directive also includes measures to reduce the exposure of children to certain advertising. The revised AVMSD has set out specific measures to help improve citizens’ media literacy skills. The Directive provides that Member States should promote and take measures for the development of media literacy skills and report on such measures to the Commission. The Commission will prepare guidelines defining the scope of such reports. Furthermore, the Directive provides that video-sharing platforms should put in place effective media literacy measures and tools and raise users' awareness of those measures and tools. These initiatives will be particularly beneficial for younger users.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The deadline for transposing AVMSD into national legislation was 19 September 2020. At the time of writing, not all Member States have adopted their national legislation yet. The Commission will issue a first report on the application of the Directive by the end of 2022.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Commission and Member States within their respective competences as per the treaties governing the EU and its functioning.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The European Regulators Group for Audiovisual Media Services (ERGA)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Creative Europe – MEDIA sub-programme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Education and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA)
European Commission
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Creative Europe is the European Union's framework programme for support to the cultural and creative sectors. The programme is structured around two independent sub-programmes for Culture (described under Goal 1.1), Media (described here), and a cross sectoral strand (described under Goal 1.1). The Programme is complementary to actions at national level in the field of culture and the audiovisual sector, reflecting the policy priorities the EU is following in the cultural and creative field. Creative Europe is open to cultural and creative organisations from EU Member States, as well as, under certain conditions, to some non-EU Member States. During the reporting period, Creative Europe included 33 participating countries, from Norway to Tunisia, from Ukraine to the Balkan region. Participation in the MEDIA programme is subject to alignment with Directive 2010/13/EU (Audiovisual Media Services Directive – AVMSD). The Creative Europe MEDIA sub-programme funds actions supporting the competitiveness of the European audiovisual industry and promoting cultural diversity
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
According to the mid-term review of the Creative Europe programme 2014-2020, MEDIA has effectively supported cultural and linguistic diversity by promoting a genre called 'European cinema', by creating an appetite for diverse 'European' content and by supporting the distribution of films that would otherwise have found it more difficult to travel and be screened. Every year, MEDIA supports the distribution of over 400 films, reaching cross-border audiences of about 65 million per year. MEDIA also supports the development of about 400 new films per year, equivalent to 25% of Europe's production. The Programme has also brought together different players from different Member States, creating value for the whole European audiovisual sector. MEDIA also supports TV production, and has helped to support genres like Nordic noir. It has helped the audiovisual industry to scale up, for example through encouraging co – productions and by supporting transnational collaboration and networks as well as vibrant markets, thus building a European ecosystem. A high number of professionals from all segments of the audiovisual value have been involved in all the 14 actions that were contained in the programme 2014-2020. To give an idea, more than 16 000 professionals have been trained during 2014-2020. About 1800 professionals have attended the supported markets per year. About 1150 individual cinemas have been supported and 240 individual distributors have been supported per year.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
For the period 2020-2027, the MEDIA programme will receive about 1.61 bn $
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
See above (“what are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measures”) For more information see https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?qid=1525096559278&uri=COM:2018:248:FIN
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
All segments of the audiovisual value have been involved
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
1150 cinemas
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
240 distributors
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

Digital Environment

Policies, measures or mechanisms are in place to support the digital transformation of cultural and creative industries and institutions (e.g. funding for digitization of analogue industries): 
YES
Policies or measures have been introduced to ensure vibrant domestic digital cultural and creative industries markets with a diversity of e-players of all sizes (e.g. fair remuneration rules; control market concentration; prevention of monopolies of digital content providers/distributors or their algorithms that potentially restrict the diversity of cultural expressions, etc.):: 
YES
Policies and measures have been implemented to enhance access to and discoverability of domestically produced cultural content in the digital environment (e.g. action plans or policies for digital content pluralism, public support to cultural or artistic portals in specific languages, national or regional online distribution platforms for domestic content, etc.): 
YES
Measures and initiatives have been implemented to promote digital creativity and competencies of artists and other cultural professionals working with new technologies (e.g. spaces for experimentation, incubators, etc.): 
YES
Statistics or studies with recent data on access to digital media, including on the type of cultural content available through digital media, are available: 
YES
Percentage of the population with subscriptions to online cultural content providers (e.g. Netflix, Spotify, Amazon, etc.): 
0.00%
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Copyright in the Digital Single Market (Directive (EU) 2019/790)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Member States of the European Union; their relevant national authorities
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Directive sets out various provisions aiming to modernize the EU copyright framework. One set of measures aims in particular at creating a fairer market place for online content, especially as regards press publications, online content sharing service providers and the remuneration of authors and performers. Reference is made to the provisions that deal with fair remuneration for authors and perfomers (Arts.18-22) as well as the rules governing the use of content by online content sharing service providers (Art. 17). The first set of rules (Arts. 18-22) aim at increasing the transparency and balance in the contractual relations between content creators (authors and performers) and their producers and publishers. These rules aim ultimately at strengthening the position of authors and performers. The objective of Article 17 is to reinforce the position of creators and right holders to negotiate and be remunerated for the online use of their content by certain user-uploaded content platforms. Article 17 also provides certainty to uploaders of content on these services: when acting on a non-commercial basis or when they do not generate significant revenues, they will be covered by the licences service providers conclude with rightholders; they will also be able to benefit from the fact that certain exceptions (e.g. parody, quotation) are made mandatory across the European Union. In June 2021 the Commission published Guidance on Article 17 of Directive 2019/790 on Copyright in the Digital Single Market (Commission Communication COM(2021)288, available at this link: https://digital-strategy.ec.europa.eu/news-redirect/708649). Apart from these provisions, the Directive also sets out specific rules to facilitate the licensing of out-of-commerce works (Arts. 8-11). These new rules will make it easier for cultural heritage institutions to obtain the necessary licences to digitise and make available, notably online and across borders, the out-of-commerce works in their collections.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The deadline for transposition of the Directive is 7 June 2021. Member States have not yet implemented it in their national legislation or have only recently done so. Therefore, it is not yet possible to measure the results.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
This will depend on the Member States of the European Union and what resources may be needed for the implementation. Overall, the most important is that the national implementing rules are in place in the near future and that the enforcement of the rules is supervised.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Member States will implement the measure in their legislation, following which stakeholders will need to take into account and follow the new rules in their market practices.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

EU statistics on ICT use by individuals

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Eurostat - Statistical Office of the European Union
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
For statistics on ICT use by individuals in the EU Member States in relation to culture, please see the annexed Culture Statistics - 2019 edition published by Eurostat. More recent (annual) data are publicly available in Eurobase: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/main/data/database - Database by theme/Population and social conditions/Culture and analysed in ‘Statistics explained’ article on https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Culture .
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Partnering with Civil Society

Professional organizations and/or trade unions representing artists and/or cultural professionals in the following sectors exist in your country (i.e. federation of musicians, publishers unions, etc.): 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Public funding schemes supporting CSOs involvement in promoting the diversity of cultural expressions exist: 
YES
Training and mentoring opportunities were organized or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years to build skills on communication, advocacy and/or fundraising of civil society organizations involved in the promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Dialogue mechanisms between public authorities and CSOs for cultural policy making and/or monitoring have been implemented during the last 4 years (meetings, working groups, etc.): 
YES
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
Voices of Culture (described below)
Music Moves Europe (described below)
Policies and measures promoting the diversity of cultural expressions have been elaborated in consultation with CSOs during the last 4 years: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Voices of Culture (Structured Dialogue)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Goethe-Institut Belgien
FLAGEY asbl
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Voices Of Culture is the structured dialogue between the cultural sector in the European Union and the European Commission. Enshrined in the (New) European Agenda for Culture, this dialogue provides a platform for civil society representatives of cultural sectors to give input to the European Commission on a range of topics. Successful applicants are invited to a Brainstorming Meeting on behalf of their organizations. A Brainstorming Report is produced by participants after the Brainstorming Meeting. This Brainstorming Report is then presented to and discussed with different services of the European Commission at a Dialogue Meeting in Brussels, Belgium. Voices Of Culture launches regular calls for applications on different topics. During the reporting period, dialogues relevant to the UNESCO 2005 Convention have included Social inclusion: partnering with other sectors https://voicesofculture.eu/2019/05/16/social-inclusion-partnering-with-other-sectors-2/ Gender equality: gender balance in the cultural and creative sectors (2019): https://voicesofculture.eu/2019/05/14/gender-balance-in-the-cultural-and-creative-sectors/ The role of culture in non-urban areas of the European Union (2019): https://voicesofculture.eu/2019/10/10/the-role-of-culture-in-non-urban-areas-of-the-european-union/ Culture and the Sustainable Development Goals: Challenges and Opportunities (2020) https://voicesofculture.eu/2020/09/21/culture-and-the-sustainable-development-goals-challenges-and-opportunities/ Status and Working Conditions of Artists and Cultural and Creative Professionals (2021) https://voicesofculture.eu/2021/01/25/status-and-working-conditions-of-artists-and-cultural-and-creative-professionals/
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
During the reporting period 10 brainstorming and dialogue meetings were held on the above topics (with several others on heritage-related topics, in line with the 2018 European Year for Cultural Heritage but not directly relevant to UNESCO 2005). 5 brainstorming reports were produced by civil society and presented to EU institutions and stakeholders, including Member State experts working on related topics under the Open Method of Coordination. The Voices of Culture meetings brought together 30-50 civil society representatives per topic, to physical meetings in Brussels and other European cities, and latterly via online channels. Several Commission services have taken part in the dialogues.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$935,340
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES

European Networks of cultural and creative organizations (Creative Europe)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The “European networks of cultural and creative organisations” scheme supports projects aiming to enhance the capacity of European cultural and creative sectors to nurture talents, to innovate, to prosper and to generate jobs and growth. Each network is supported by a grant of up to €825,000. 28 European Networks of cultural and creative sector organizations have been supported by the Creative Europe programme between 2017-2020, in the fields of music, cultural heritage, museums, theatre, dance, circus, architecture, design and multidisciplinary. These networks are experienced member-based structures encompassing thousands of operators and professionals. As representative bodies they are consulted by the Commission and help design the EU and Member States’ culture policies. The networks’ actions go beyond advocacy : they facilitate the internationalization of artists’ careers and contribute to the transfer of skills, competences and know-how among peers. As connectors between organisations across borders, they have helped the development and success of many Creative Europe-funded projects such as cooperation projects or the newly established platforms which offer support to emerging artists. They ensure that these projects have long-lasting effects and that their results are disseminated to large audiences.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
28 networks representing more than 4,500 organizations in 92 countries across Europe and beyond: - Music (AEC, EJN, ECA-EC, ECSA, REMA, EMC, JMI, Live DMA) - Cultural Heritage and Museums (Europa Nostra, ERIH, FRH, NEMO) - Theatre – Dance – Circus (EDN, Circostrada, ETC, FEST, IETM) - Architecture and Design (ACE, ADCE) - Multidisciplinary (AMATEO, CAE, EFA, EUNIC, ENCC, ENCATC, Eurozine, IMZ, Trans Europe Halles) The networks have been active in - collecting and disseminating data, information, practices, ideas and solutions; - training and providing advice to professionals; representing the sectors - advocating on their behalf on key sectoral issues.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$45 million between 2014-2020
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1e4ce5f2-8508-11ea-bf12-01aa75ed71a1/language-en

European Platforms for the promotion of emerging artists (Creative Europe)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The European Platforms scheme, funded by the Creative Europe programme, offers action grants to organisations promoting European creators and artists, especially emerging talent, willing to engage at a European and transnational level. These organizations come together within a platform to showcase their common artistic vision and to help their members improve their audience development techniques. The “European platforms for the promotion of emerging artists” scheme aims to increase the visibility and the circulation of European emerging artists and works outside their own borders; and to facilitate access to European works and artists coming from a diversity of countries for a large and diversified audience. Platforms must be composed of a coordinating entity and at least 11 members’ organisations registered in different participating countries. The grant requested per project cannot exceed EUR 2,800,000 in total. The objectives are: - promotion of the mobility of creators and artists; - promotion of emerging talent from other European countries; - stimulating a genuine Europe-wide programming of cultural and artistic activities; - contribution to audience development; and - providing visibility to Europe’s values and different cultures. 15 platforms have been supported during the reporting period, in fields as diverse as music, photography, architecture, circus, poetry, design and manufacture, dance. Their definitions of emerging artists are as diverse as the sectors: some are young, in others age is not a barrier; some are leaving formal training, in others formal training is not a requirement. What all the alumni of the platforms share is talent, and what the platforms offer them is exposure at a European level. The platforms use different mechanisms to promote emerging talent: they offer competitions, showcases, festivals along with coaching and mentoring by established artists and creators in the field.
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The 15 European Platforms supported during the reporting period (2017-2020) have been: - LIVEUROPE (music): initiative supporting concert venues in their efforts to promote up-and-coming European artists - Future Architecture Platform (architecture) - MAGIC CARPETS (performance): platform dedicated to emerging artists to start their magical journeys across Europe - VERSOPOLIS poetry (performance/ literature): European poetry platform that creates new opportunities for emerging European poets - European Media Art Platform (visual arts) - Classical Futures Europe (music): platform supporting emerging artists in the field of classical music - CircusNext PLaTFoRM (performance/ circus): platform supporting creation and diffusion to emerging contemporary circus authors - EuroStrings- European Guitar Collaborative (music) - Aerowaves (dance): platform creating cross-border performance opportunities for emerging choreographers - European Talent Exchange Programme (performance): platform aiming to give a boost to the international careers of European artists - PARALLEL – European Photo Based Platform (photo) - FUTURES – European Photography Platform (photo) - Distributed Design Market Platform (visual art): exchange and networking hub for the European maker movement - SHAPE – Sound, Heterogenos Art and Performance in Europe (visual art): platform for Innovative Music and Audiovisual Art from Europe - FEDORA Platform (music/ dance): platform supporting innovation in opera and ballet 7 Platforms reported that just over 1000 artists were paid for almost 7000 days of work, 8 Platforms organised almost 800 exhibitions, showcases and similar events. Platform alumni - a total of more than 6000 emerging artists to date - are gaining more and more recognition, and many of them (literally hundreds) have won national and international prizes in their fields. The Platforms have brought a diversity of artists or works from underrepresented countries to a wider audience in other countries. Many are now mature with a strong brand identity and a robust grant distribution mechanism (using cascading grants).
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$48 million between 2014-2020
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/9e3befbd-a0c9-11ea-9d2d-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-search#

Music Moves Europe dialogues

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Dialogue meeting organised by the Commission in 2019 to discuss topical issues related to musical diversity in Europe and the competitiveness of the industry. A second (online) conference in March 2021, entitled Diversity and Competitiveness of the European Music Sector.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
A first meeting in June 2019 focused on - The future of music media - Challenges for live music - Access to capital for the music sector - The new EU Copyright Directive A report of that meeting is available here https://ec.europa.eu/culture/sites/default/files/library/mme-conference-report-web.pdf A second (online) conference in March 2021, entitled Diversity and Competitiveness of the European Music Sector, brought together music industry stakeholders, civil society organizations and EU Member States’ representatives. There were four sessions on - Impact of Covid-19 on the music sector and its recovery - Role of music in society, for social cohesion and well-being - Music streaming and cultural diversity - Music Moves Europe A report of the conference is available here: https://ec.europa.eu/culture/sites/default/files/2021-05/Final%20Report-EU%20Music%20conference%202021%20march.pdf
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
See separate section on Music Moves Europe for overall budget.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

European Creative Hubs Network

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The European Creative Hubs Network began in 2016 as a 2-year project co-funded by the European Commission through the cross-sectoral strand of the Creative Europe programme. Sustained by membership fees since 2018, free membership for 2020 and 2021 has been offered as an act of solidarity to the sector in light of COVID-19. ECHN is a peer-led network with a mission to enhance the creative, economic and social impact of hubs around Europe and neighboring countries. As focal points for creative professionals and businesses, hubs offer the most effective way to support the growth and development of cultural and creative industries
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The ECHN currently has over 60 member organizations. In 2017 it organized 3 workshops in Madrid, Berlin and Edinburgh, and produced a Creative Hubkit. a pdf toolkit free to download for people looking to set up their own Creative Hubs. The EHCN has implemented five projects, each separately co-funded by the EU: - Creative FLIP (Finance, Learning, Innovation and Patenting – an EU pilot project described elsewhere in this report) - MAkersXchange (EU pilot project) - Creation (Cultural and Arts Entrepreneurship in Adult Education, for women from migrant communities – supported by Erasmus+) - Crowdfunding4culture - CORAL-ITN (collaborative workspaces in rural and peripheral areas, supported by Horizon 2020)
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

International civil society dialogue and exchange

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EU-funded Cultural Diplomacy Platform (2016-2020) and Cultural Relations Platform (2020-) have aimed to • Support cooperation among cultural and creative sectors in facilitating contacts and networking of different EU and third country cultural actors, including cultural institutions, private foundations, civil society, and other organisations • Strengthen communities and networks of cultural practitioners in developing training programmes for cultural managers in leadership positions both within and outside of Europe In 2017, 2018 and 2019 the Global Cultural Leadership Programme gathered 40 young cultural leaders each year from EU and non-EU countries. https://www.cultureinexternalrelations.eu/2019/11/05/2016-2019-the-global-cultural-leadership-programme/ In 2020 a virtual exchange was held (in light of COVID-19): https://www.cultureinexternalrelations.eu/2020/08/03/gclp-alumni-virtual-exchange/ The 2019 Culture4Future international colloquium brought together 400 experts and professionals to explore how cultural and creative sectors contribute to sustainable development and inclusiveness, culminating in the adoption of a manifesto “Culture for the future”: https://www.eunicglobal.eu/news/published-manifesto-culture-for-future The annual European Development Days organized by the Commission in Brussels have continued during the current reporting period (with the exception of 2020 when the event was postponed in light of the COVID-19 pandemic; the 2021 event takes place entirely online). Bringing together 8,000 participants annually, the EDD programmes are largely defined by the EDD community itself. The 2017, 2018 and 2019 EDDs each featured events and stands on culture and development. These included high-level policy seminars, such as this 2019 session on fostering gender equality in culture and development, attended by the EC Director General for International Cooperation and Development and the Ministers of Culture from Costa Rica and Cuba http://moreeurope.org/event/european-development-days-the-cultural-dimension-of-development/)
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Goal 2 - Achieve a Balanced Flow of Cultural Goods and Services and Increase the Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Please indicate if the following policies and measures exist in your country: 
Work permit regulations supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and cultural professionals in your country (e.g. double taxation avoidance agreements, special work permits and health insurance, subsidies to cover living expenses, etc.)
Please indicate if the following operational programmes have been developed or supported/funded by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Information resources or training services providing practical guidance to facilitate the mobility of cultural professionals (e.g. Internet platforms)
Infrastructure (e.g. arts residencies, cultural institutes, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Major cultural events (e.g. cultural seasons, festivals, cultural industries markets, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Please indicate if the following mobility funds (e.g. scholarships, travel grants, etc.) have been managed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Public funds supporting the outward mobility of national or resident artists and other cultural professionals
Public funds supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and other cultural professionals, notably from developing countries
Public funds specifically supporting the mobility of artists and other cultural professionals from or between developing countries, including through North-South-South and South-South cooperation
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

i-Portunus

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
i-Portunus is an EU scheme funded by the Creative Europe programme since 2019 speciifically to support the mobility of artists, creators and cultural professionals among 41 countries participating in the Creative Europe programme. Mobility grants are awarded based on individuals’ projects aiming at international collaborations, professional development, co-production and co-creation. The i-Portunus website also provides details of other artists’ mobility opportunities, reports and innovative initiatives. i-Portunus is currently a pilot initiative and will be mainstreamed into the EU’s Creative Europe programme as of 2022.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The 337 artists, creators and cultural professionals awarded grants in 2019, said that as a result of the mobility funded by the programme: - 97% acquired new skills/knowledge - 94% developed new audiences/outlets - 94% developed new co-productions/creations, and 49% received a job offer. This year 305 individual artist of cultural professional out of >3200 applications have been selected to receive mobility grants of max 3000 to travel to one of the 41 participating countries for 7-60 days to another for a total budget of >500,000.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$ 595,000 2020-21
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Stories and statistics from the 2019 i-Portunus calls have been published online https://www.i-portunus.eu/about-the-programme/i-portunus-2019/ These show that the opportunities offered by i-Portunus are attractive to and appreciated by participants, especially young and emerging artists with low incomes. The 2019 scheme attracted over 3000 applications and funded 337 individuals to materialize their collaboration projects in another country. The most important result was the impact that the participants attributed to their mobility experience: 97% acquired new skills/knowledge, 94% developed new audiences/outlets, 94% developed new co-productions/creations, and 49% received a job offer. This is a most impressive impact considering the limited financial support of only 1.500 to 3,400 euros per individual.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Goethe Institut, Institut francais, Izolyatsia.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Other EU programmes for artists’ mobility

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In addition to the culture-specific i-Portunus programme described separately, the following EU initiatives and programmes also support mobility among EU and non-EU countries, including for students and professionals in the cultural and creative sectors: - Erasmus+ programme (incorporating Erasmus Mundus) - Erasmus for young entrepreneurs (COSME programme of the EU for the Competitiveness of Enterprises and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises) - STARTS Residency programme - STARTS Initiative (Science, Technology & the Arts initiative of the European Commission, under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme of the EU).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

EU policy collaboration to support mobility

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The European Commission promotes policy collaboration and advocacy among Member States and cultural and creative professionals on social security, taxation, copyright and visa issues to reduce barriers to the inward and outward mobility of artists within the European Union, and third country national artists travelling to the EU Schengen area. During the reporting period this work has included Sectoral social dialogues run by DG Employment, Social Affairs & Inclusion), on: Audiovisual https://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=480&langId=en&intPageId=1825 Live performance sector https://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=480&langId=en&intPageId=1842 EFA RISE & EFA RISE 2 projects, co-funded by the Creative Europe Programme and implemented by EFA - European Festivals Association and PEARLE* - Live Performance Europe, to produce a series of brochures for cultural managers on: - Social security in an international context - Artist taxation in an international context - VAT in an international context - Copyright clearing for live events in an international context - Visas for third countries travelling to the Schengen area https://www.pearle.eu/activity/efa-rise-efa-rise-2-apr-2014-mar-2021
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) – EU implementation

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission, DG Environment
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Regulation of trade (including movement into and from the EU) of objects containing parts of protected species listed under the Convention
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
At the last Conference of the Parties to the CITES Convention (August 2019) the EU and other Parties agreed on the exclusion of finished musical instruments (as well as finished musical instrument parts and finished musical instrument accessories) from the scope of the CITES listing of rosewood timber. This excludes owners of such items from fulfilling certain administrative obligations that are otherwise required for international transfer of items containing such timber.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The CITES Secretariat launched Notification 2020/033 in April 2020 requesting CITES Parties to submit information about potential problems with the implementation of the exemptions for rosewood species as explained above. The EU has not noted any problems with this implementation. Due to Covid-19, no discussion has taken place yet at the international level on this issue.

Flow of Cultural Goods and Services

Export strategies or measures to support the distribution of cultural goods and services outside your country exist for the following cultural domains: 
-
Your country has granted or benefited from preferential treatment* to support a balanced exchange of cultural goods and services in the last 4 years: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Your country has provided or benefited in the last 4 years from Aid for Trade support, a form of Official Development Assistance (ODA), that helped to build capacities to formulate trade policies, participate in negotiating and implementing agreements that provide a special status to cultural goods and services: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Music Moves Europe

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Music Moves Europe is the overarching framework for the European Commission's initiatives and actions in support of Europe’s music sector. Developed from a series of meetings with representatives of the music sector starting in 2015, Music Moves Europe was launched as a strategic initiative by the European Commission. Music Moves Europe’s aim is to build on and strengthen further the sector's strong assets: creativity, diversity and competitiveness. Its specific objectives are to: - promote creativity and innovation; - safeguard and expand the diversity of European music; - help the sector adapt to and benefit from digitisation
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Music Moves Europe has supported the European music sector in four ways during the reporting period: - Funding. A sector-specific preparatory action “Music Moves Europe: Boosting European music diversity and talent” provided 1.5m EUR funding in 2018 (which supported 10 pilot training programmes for young professionals, and 10 innovative online and offline music distribution models). In 2019, a further 3m EUR were allocated, to projects on professionalization and training, export of European music, cooperation of small music venues, co-creation and co-production, the health and wellbeing of music creators, and music education and learning. (More details available here: https://ec.europa.eu/culture/document/brochure-music-moves-europe-preparatory-action-2019) These Music Moves Europe actions are additional to the support of the Creative Europe programme, which funded more than 90 cooperation projects, platforms and networks on music from 2014-2020. - Policy. The topic “diversity and competitiveness of the music sector” was added to the Council Work Plan for Culture (described separately), with the aim of identifying transferable best practices and discussing suitable policy measures at EU and national levels. - Legal environment. Music Moves Europe has influenced EU legislative initiatives on funding, working conditions, remuneration, mobility and copyright (described separately). - Dialogue. Music Moves Europe has led to closer dialogue between the Commission and representatives of the music sector, through events of its own (described separately), but also through the Commission’s regular attendance at European music festivals, showcases and trade fairs. The Music Moves Europe initiative supported the 2019 publication of a study on a European music export strategy. The study takes stock of the main obstacles, challenges and opportunities faced by European music when crossing borders and shows that Anglo-American repertoire appears to be more successful in this context than music from the rest of Europe. The study subsequently describes the strengths and challenges of European music export strategies, based on the results of a survey circulated to national and regional organisations specialised in the export of music. The study then focuses in particular on four key international territories (United States, Canada, South Africa and China). Building on this stocktaking exercise, a “European music export strategy” is described, through a set of objectives, target groups and measures, including innovative funding schemes and policy approaches, reflecting the need to include music sector stakeholders and policymakers both at national and European level. A proposal for the articulation and the implementation of the European music export strategy is formulated, with key expected results in terms of market structuration, policy developments, data collection and cross-border circulation of European music. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/4be2f11d-216c-11ea-95ab-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-111483830
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Audiovisual co-productions - Working Group of EU Member States’ experts

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission, EU Member State governments
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The 2019-2022 Council Work Plan for Culture included a topic on co-productions in the audiovisual sector, for policy collaboration through a working group of EU Member States’ experts under the Open Method of Coordination. The task identified for this OMC group was ‘In order to stimulate co-productions, policy recommendations and incentives for co-productions in legal frameworks and audiovisual support schemes will be developed. The mandate of the working group (link above) called for it to take into account, inter alia: • the role of other European bodies such as Eurimages; • the role of legal frameworks, such as bilateral co-production agreements, the Council of Europe Convention on Cinematographic Co-production, and the European Convention on Transfrontier Television; • the contribution of private partners in financing and distribution; • the role of TV broadcasters, both public and private, and VOD, as well as the importance of the role of distribution in the value chain; • the emergence and the impact of new market players, in particular global video on demand (VOD) services and the new non-linear business models they have generated; • the impact of new digital technologies on audiovisual services, especially for the recommendation, personalisation and processing of audiovisual content; • the role of overseas or non-EU co-production partners; • changes in audience behaviour, especially in relation to how to engage young people.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The working group of Member States experts on audiovisual coproductions met 3 times in 2019 and 2020 and aims to complete its report by the end of 2021. Its meetings have focused on tackling bureaucratic obstacles to international co-productions, the consequences of COVID, and insurance policies. External organisations have participated as observers, including the European Film Agency Directors association (EFADS), Cine-Regio, the European Audiovisual Observatory and Eurimages. The group’s work has also been presented to the Council of Europe When the group’s report is finalised, the Chair will be invited to present it to the Council Audiovisual Working Party. The Commission’s Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology (DG CNECT) proposes to use their stakeholder dialogues (particularly the European Film Forum) and their presence at film markets to promote the results.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Multilingualism and translation - Working Group of EU Member States’ experts

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission, EU Member State governments
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Publishing
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The 2019-2022 Council Work Plan for Culture included the topic of multilingualism and translation, for policy collaboration through a working group of EU Member States’ experts under the Open Method of Coordination (OMC). The group’s target output was as follows Experts will exchange best practices on supporting translation in the book and publishing sector, as well as in other cultural and creative sectors, and recommend concrete measures under the Creative Europe Programme to promote linguistic diversity and the circulation of works. The mandate of the working group (link above), further described its role as follows: “In order to encourage multilingualism and translation and to promote better circulation of European works, the OMC Group will discuss how EU and national support schemes and public funding may support the book and publishing sector at each step of the value chain, from the original author to readers across borders, in Europe and beyond with a special focus on translation from and to lesser-used languages. The OMC Group will discuss in particular how the translation sector should be reinforced to cover the needs of the book and publishing sector but also other cultural and creative sectors (visual and performing arts, the audiovisual sector and the music sector) as well as the general public/audience in order to contribute to the circulation of cultural works. The OMC Group will recommend concrete measures, which may be implemented under the 2021-2027 Creative Europe programme. Experts will exchange on national policies and best practices in international book promotion; training and professionalisation of literary translators; and funding mechanisms to support translation, publication, distribution and promotion of European books and other works within the EU and beyond. Discussions will include lessons learnt from the book and publishing sector, as well as other cultural sectors such as visual and performing arts, audiovisual and music sectors, in order to build synergies, when possible. Based on the findings resulting from the activities mentioned above, the OMC Group will prepare a report providing at least the following chapters: the role of public policies and funding schemes at national and European level in helping 1) the circulation of translated books and 2) the development of a vibrant translation sector able to cover all cultural sectors. It should include an analysis of best practices as well as recommendations addressed to the relevant public entities, and also to professionals and other concerned stakeholders.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
This OMC group met regularly in 2020 and 2021 and decided to divide its tasks among 3 subgroups: initial and continuous training of translators; professionalisation, status and remuneration of translators; and cross-border circulation and promotion of translated books. The (sub)groups have invited representatives of European and national initiatives: Enlit (network of national public book promotion agencies) Traduki (private-public support to translation) CEATL & AVTEurope (networks of literay and audiovisual translators) EMT (network of prominent European Masters in Translation) RECIT (European network of translation centers) PETRA-E (Plateforme Européenne pour la traduction littéraire) ALDUS (network of book fairs). Publishers and Booksellers have been invited as individuals or collective organisations (Federation of European publishers, European and International booksellers Federation)). Key issues discussed so far include the offer of language and translation studies at secondary and high-education level; the quality of book translations and film subtitling in a context of automatisation of translation and pressure on translators to keep prices low; fair remuneration, copyright issues and the transposition of the EU directive; European cooperation between national promotion and translation agencies in Europe and beyond; support to sales and market access. The group aims to publish its report by October 2021.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

EU Statistics on international trade in cultural goods

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Eurostat - Statistical Office of the European Union
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
EU statistics for international trade in cultural goods are published in the Eurostat publication Culture Statistics - 2019 Edition, annexed to this report and available here: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-statistical-books/-/ks-01-19-712. More recent (annual) data are publicly available in Eurobase: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/main/data/database - Database by theme/Population and social conditions/Culture and analysed in ‘Statistics explained’ article on https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Culture . On the value of direct foreign investment in creative and cultural industries, such data are not available at EU level, only at national level.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Treaties and agreements

Multilateral or bilateral trade and/or investment agreements providing a special status to cultural goods and/or services have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negociation: 
NO
Multilateral or bilateral agreements including specific provisions providing a special status to cultural goods and services and digital products in the field of e-commerce have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negotiation: 
NO
Multilateral or bilateral agreements, declarations and/or strategies on relevant policy issues for the diversity of cultural expressions (e.g. education, digital, intellectual property, sustainable development, gender equality, etc.) signed or amended to take into account the objectives or principles of the Convention during the last 4 years: 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

EU-Korea Protocol on Cultural Cooperation

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EU-Korea Protocol on Cultural Cooperation was concluded in 2009 within the framework of the EU-Korea Free Trade Agreement, and has been in full application since 13 December 2015. The Protocol sets a framework within which the two Parties shall cooperate to facilitate exchange in cultural activities, goods and services, including in the audio-visual sector, and to improve the conditions governing such exchanges. Under the Protocol, the EU and Korea have established a Committee on Cultural Cooperation to oversee its implementation. The Committee is composed of senior officials from within the administrations of each Party who have expertise and experience in cultural matters and practices. Meetings are held once a year in the EU and Korea alternately, and have involved study visits to creative hubs and museums. The main provision of the Protocol deals with audio-visual co-productions. The EU and Korea, in conformity with their respective legislation, have agreed to grant an entitlement for EU-Korea audio-visual co-productions to benefit from their respective schemes for the promotion of local/regional cultural content. This entitlement was extended during the reporting period, from July 2017 until June 2020 as approved by the Council. The European Commission have promoted and disseminated information about the Protocol at professional events, including film festivals.
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
During the reporting period the EU-Korea Cultural Cooperation Committee met four times, in March 2017 (Seoul), 9 April 2018 (Brussels), 13 May 2019 (Seoul) and 9 December 2020 (online). Agenda items included Cultural Exchanges and Dialogue (Protocol, Article 2) Expanding Exchanges through Residency Programmes (Protocol, Article 4) Artists and other cultural professionals and practitioners (Protocol, Article 4) Audiovisual Co-productions (Protocol, Article 5) Performing Arts (Protocol, Article 8) Culture and Cities New Developments in the cultural and creative sectors Protection of cultural heritage sites Joint research in the field of culture and arts Convergence of arts and technology Young Talent Architecture Award
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

CARIFORUM-EU Economic Partnership Agreement

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Union, CARIFORUM Secretariat, 16 CARIFORUM Member States, 27 EU Member States
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The CARIFORUM-EU EPA (Economic Partnership Agreement) was concluded in 2008 between the CARIFORUM Member States (the 15 Caribbean Community states and the Dominican Republic), and the EU and its Member States. Article 73 of the EPA itself, entitled “Maintenance of standards”, states: “The EC Party and the Signatory CARIFORUM States shall ensure that foreign direct investment is not encouraged by…relaxing core labour standards or laws aimed at protecting and promoting cultural diversity”. Protocol III On Cultural Cooperation states that “The definitions and concepts used in this Protocol are those of the UNESCO Convention on the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions adopted in Paris on 20 October 2005”. The protocol includes a number of horizontal provisions relevant to the Convention including on: - Cultural exchanges and dialogue (Article 2) - Artists and other cultural professionals (Article 3) - Technical assistance (Article 4) - Audio-visual, including cinematographic, cooperation (Article 5) - Performing arts (Article 7) - Publications (Article 8) and
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
As described by the Convention secretariat in its document DCE/21/8.CP/11 for the 8th Conference of Parties, a sub-regional workshop entitled “Advancing Preferential Treatment for Culture” was held in Barbados on 6 and 7 November 2019 for the Caribbean region, in partnership with the CARIFORUM Secretariat. This was held in conjunction with the public launch of a study titled Culture in the CARIFORUM-European Union Economic Partnership Agreement: Rebalancing trade flows between Europe and the Caribbean? The two-day workshop, attended by the European Union delegation to Barbados, brought together more than 30 officials from intergovernmental and governmental agencies and cultural and trade professionals from Barbados, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Saint Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago. The workshop prepared an outcome document to inform future discussions on policies and measures required to better implement the Protocol on Cultural Cooperation, especially with regard to audio-visual co-productions and cultural exchanges, and the provisions of the EPA in relation to market access for entertainment services. Two large EU-funded programmes in the sub-region, “Transcultura: Integrating Cuba, the Caribbean and the European Union through Culture and Creativity” and “Creative Caribbean: An Ecosystem of ‘Play’ for Growth and Development”, will build on existing dynamics and aim to strengthen the capacity of Caribbean countries to make the most of the Protocol on Cultural Cooperation.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
An ex-post evaluation of the CARIFORUM-EU EPA was conducted for the European Commission by Ecorys. Their revised interim report was published in February 2020 and takes account of the UNESCO study. It is available online here: https://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2020/february/tradoc_158657.pdf
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 3 - Integrate Culture in Sustainable Development Frameworks

National Sustainable Development Policies & Plans

National sustainable development plans and strategies recognize the strategic role of: 
-
Please rate from 1 to 4 the type of outcomes expected by the inclusion of culture in national sustainable development plans and strategies 1 most often expected outcome 4 least expected outcome): 
-
Public cultural bodies and agencies responsible for culture or creative industries are involved in the design and implementation of sustainable development policies and plans (i.e. participate in coordination mechanisms such as joint planning committees): 
YES
Cultural industry-led regeneration initiatives and projects at the regional, urban and/or rural levels have been implemented in the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures facilitate participation in cultural life and access to diverse cultural facilities and expressions, notably addressing the needs of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (e.g. via reduced entrance fees; audience development, arts education and audiences awareness-raising): 
YES
Latest data on cultural participation rates by socio demographic variables (sex/age groups/rural- urban/income levels/education levels): 
The EU publication Culture Statistics - 2019 edition annexed to this report gives details on cultural participation (by different social variables, including sex) in the EU Member States. The most important data source here is the EU-SILC (Survey on Income and living conditions) and its ad hoc module on cultural participation.
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Cultural dimensions of sustainable development – Council Resolution, Amendment and Working Group of EU experts

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Union
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EU and its Member States are committed to implementing the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including with respect to culture. In November 2019 the Council adopted a resolution on the cultural dimensions of sustainable development, under the Finnish Presidency of the European Union: EUR-Lex - 42019Y1206(01) - EN - EUR-Lex (europa.eu) In May 2020 the Council amended its Work Programme for Culture to prioritise the SDGs, and invited the Commission to convene a Working Group of EU Member States experts on the cultural dimension of sustainable development: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2020.193.01.0020.01.ENG The Working Group began meeting in 2021, to the following mandate finalised by the Cultural Affairs Committee: https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-6161-2020-INIT/en/pdf In 2021 the Commission published a Monitoring report on progress towards the SDGs in an EU context. Prepared by Eurostat, this report includes 10 references to culture and 7 to UNESCO: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3217494/12878705/KS-03-21-096-EN-N.pdf/8f9812e6-1aaa-7823-928f-03d8dd74df4f?t=1623741433852
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Working Group of EU Member States experts on the cultural dimension of sustainable development, held under the Open Method of Coordination (OMC), was convened by the Commission in 2021. The group held its first three meetings in January, May and June 2021, with a high rate of participation (over 20 Member States represented) and two elected co-chairs including the outgoing Head of Division for Culture at the German Commission for UNESCO. At these meetings, the Commission presented work in progress in other OMC groups under the Council Work Plan for Culture: on high quality architecture, on strengthening cultural heritage resilience for climate change, and on gender equality, as well as from relevant research dimensions under Horizon Europe – Cluster 2 “Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society”. Further information was shared to align the work of the OMC with other relevant work at EU level, such as the New European Bauhaus, the Inter-service Group on Culture and the ongoing preparation of the EU quadrennial report to UNESCO on the 2005 Convention on Cultural Diversity. An exchange was also organised with cultural and creative sector representatives from the EU’s Voices of Culture dialogue on culture and the SDGs (described separately in this report). UNESCO representatives attended both meetings and proactively kept the OMC group involved in their latest activities. A close cooperation with UNESCO is thus underway and will continue to feed the work of the group. Next steps are: - Ongoing collection of examples, both at Member States’ level and at sectorial level of cultural policies/projects, on how culture has reinforced the capacity to address SDGs and can be usefully integrated in national strategies for sustainable development. - Analysis of reporting tools that are relevant to better measure and assess the interplay between culture and sustainable development in the wider international context (such as the Culture 5 2030 Thematic indicators and the implementation of the 2005 Unesco Convention by EU Member States). - Exploring actions and synergies between national and EU levels, as forms of policy cooperation, also extracted from the ongoing analysis of the VNRs (Voluntary National Reviews) related process. This OMC group is due to complete its work in 2022.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Voices of Culture – EU stakeholder dialogue on culture & SDGs

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In 2020, the Commission convened two meetings for and with European cultural and creative sector stakeholders, under its Voices of Culture structured dialogue, on the topic “Culture and the Sustainable Development Goals: Challenges and Opportunities”. Following an open call for applications, 47 organizations were selected to participate. They were invited to focus their discussions in five areas: • Education. What can the EU do to support arts education and citizenship education to promote peaceful, inclusive and sustainable societies? • Growth and employment. How can the EU help improve working conditions for artists? How should it support the International Year of Creative Economy for Sustainable Development? How should sustainable cultural tourism be promoted? (See also the findings of the previous Voices of Culture dialogue on developing entrepreneurial and innovation potential). • Sustainable communities. While there has been significant EU action to protect and safeguard cultural and natural heritage, particularly in the context of the 2018 European Year and its follow-up, are there other areas of culture policy where the EU could/should do more? For example, what more could/should the EU do to promote the sustainability of cultural infrastructures in communities, in light of COVID-19? • Climate action. How should the EU support the cultural sector in strengthening resilience and adapting to climate change? • Freedom of expression. What more should the EU do to protect artists at risk, and to promote freedom of expression and the right to culture in the European Union and around the world?
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The 47 selected organizations met twice (online), in December 2020 and February 2021. They produced a comprehensive, and very high quality, report on culture and SDGs, available here: https://voicesofculture.eu/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/VoC-Brainstorming-Report-Culture-and-SDGs.pdf The report includes 6 references to the UNESCO 2005 Convention, 10 recommendations, and chapters on - Culture & Education (SDG4) - Culture & Decent Work, Economic Growth & Employment (SDG 8) - Culture & Sustainable Cities and Communities (SDG 11) - Culture as a Transformational Pathway for a Just Transition (SDG 13). This report was presented to the Commission services (EAC and other interested DGs), and to Member State experts participating in the Open Method of Coordination Working Group (described separately).
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
link: https://voicesofculture.eu/2020/09/21/culture-and-the-sustainable-development-goals-challenges-and-opportunities/
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

COSME – WORTH Partnership Project

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Innovation Council and Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Executive Agency (EISMEA)
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Under the EU’s COSME programme (for the Competitiveness of Enterprises and small and medium-sized enterprises), the WORTH Partnership Project is an accelerator programme in support of business partnerships between designers/creators, manufacturers/craftsmen and tech providers. The aim is to develop new, innovative business ideas in the lifestyle industries (fashion, design furniture, and home decor). New products, services and business models have been tested with the active involvement of designers and other creative professionals. Through the coaching provided during the acceleration programme, designers and creatives have acquired entrepreneurial/managerial skills including how to protect their intellectual property rights and outline a business strategy, how to pitch their business ideas and find investors.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
WORTH Partnership Project has supported 152 transnational partnerships through three calls for proposals, involving 350 partners from 34 EU-COSME countries.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
4.223 Mil. USD = 3.478 Mil. EUR
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
AITEX – Textile Research Institute The project relies on a large community of mentors, experts and project’s local ambassadors: https://www.worthproject.eu/worth-community/
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

COSME – DeFINE network

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Innovation Council and Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Executive Agency (EISMEA)
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Under the EU’s COSME programme (for the Competitiveness of Enterprises and small and medium-sized enterprises), DeFINE is a European network of incubators for fashion-tech. It is a collaborative project, which aims to support the fusion of cutting-edge technologies and innovation within the European fashion and design industries. The aim is to develop a network of incubators & accelerators, start-ups & SMEs, and financiers to form a European fashion-technology community where cross-sectoral knowledge is shared and new business solutions grow.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The project supported 25 start-ups and created a network of design centers, business support organization, incubators, knowledge centers and financiers across Europe.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
1.809 Mil. USD = 1.48987 Mil. EUR
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Politecnico di Milano (PoliMi) - Coordinator
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
Fondazione Politecnico di Milano (FPM)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
The University of the Arts London (UAL LCF)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
Institut Francais de la Mode (IFM)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
European Business and Innonation Centre Network AISBL (EBN)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
Inkubatorn i Borås AB (INK)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
European Apparel and Textile Confederation (EURATEX),
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
Media Deals UG (MEDIA DEALS)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
Asociation para la Gestion del Centro Europeo de Empresas e Innovacion de Burgors (CEEI-BURGOS)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
CY.R.I.C CYPRUS Research and Innovation Center (CYRIC)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

EU research and innovation for culture - Horizon

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Research Executive Agency
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EU’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme ran from 2014 to 2020, making available €77 billion in funding for research and innovation. Structured around the objectives defined for its three priorities: "Excellent science", "Industrial leadership" and "Societal challenges", culture came primarily under the umbrella of 'Societal Challenges'. A booklet annexed to this report, gives details of $133m worth of research projects relevant to the Convention, under way during the reporting period. The new Horizon Europe (HE) research and innovation programme from 2021-2027 includes a dedicated research “cluster” for Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society, under HE’s second pillar, Global Challenges and European Industrial Competitiveness. The Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society cluster has a budget of 2.28 billion euros, with 400m available from 2021-2022. It is focused in 3 intervention areas, all relevant to the 2005 Convention: democracy and governance, social and economic transformations and European cultural heritage and the cultural and creative industries. One of its specific priorities is to “support the emergence of new forms of cultural expression”. The following planned topics are highly relevant to cultural and creative industries, and there is a desire to actively involve CCIs in the research: HORIZON-CL2-2021-HERITAGE-01-03: CCIs as a driver of innovation and competitiveness HORIZON-CL2-2022-HERITAGE-01-05: Towards a competitive, fair and sustainable European music ecosystem HORIZON-CL2-2022-HERITAGE-01-06: Increase the potential of the international competitiveness of the European filmmaking industry HORIZON-CL2-2021-HERITAGE-01-04: Preserving & enhancing cultural heritage with advanced digital technologies HORIZON-CL2-2022-HERITAGE-01-04: Traditional crafts for the future: a new approach HORIZON-CL2-2022-HERITAGE-01-09: Games and culture shaping our society HORIZON-CL2-2022-HERITAGE-01-10: The New European Bauhaus – shaping a greener and fairer way of life in creative and inclusive societies through Architecture, Design and Arts
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
A booklet annexed to this report (derived from the EU’s open access CORDIS platform), gives details of $133m worth of research projects relevant to the Convention, being undertaken during the reporting period. Much of this research is still ongoing, and results are not available. It is notable that the first featured project in the attached booklet specifically references the Convention. Entitled “Protecting the Right to Culture of Persons with Disabilities and Enhancing Cultural Diversity through European Union Law”, this research hosted by the National University of Ireland began in 2020 and aims to bridge the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the UNESCO 2005 Convention. The other projects listed are conducting research across the cultural and creative sectors (including architecture, design, literature, opera, textiles) and across a range of themes, from education and social inclusion to urban regeneration, creative economies, and tourism. There is also a significant body of research described in the booklet relevant to the diversity of cultural expressions in the digital environment, including projects on copyright, content personalization, analytics and recommendations, media platforms and blockchains.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$133m (2017-21, for ongoing research listed in annex, under Horizon 2020) $476m (2021-22, budget for new Cluster 2 research, under Horizon Europe)
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Universities
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Culture and creative sector organizations
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

International Cooperation for Sustainable Development

Your country has contributed to or benefited from the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) during the last 4 years: 
-
Development cooperation strategies, including South-South cooperation strategies, recognize the strategic role of creativity and diverse cultural expressions: 
YES
If YES, please provide the name(s) of the strategy and year(s) of adoption: 
-
Your country manages multi- and/or bilateral technical assistance and capacity building cooperation programmes supporting: 
Cultural policy development and implementation in developing countries
Medium, small or micro-enterprise development of creative industries and markets in developing countries
Artists and cultural professionals in developing countries
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

ACP-EU Culture Programme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission’s DG for International Partnerships Organisation of the African, Caribbean, Pacific States
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The programme intends to boost the potential of the cultural and creative sector and its contribution to the social and economic development of the ACP countries, aiming at: • Encouraging entrepreneurship and cultural innovation, as well as the participation of the youth • Creating new jobs and increasing artists’ and cultural professionals’ revenues • Raising the quality of the ACP cultural productions, • Valorizing the cultural productions and artists from the ACP countries on international markets.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Selection of implementing consortia Support to 51 audiovisual co-production (films, TV series, documentaries) Launch of the first calls for proposals for cultural and creative industries Support to co-production: • Organisation internationale de la francophonie (OIF) • Centre National du Cinema (CNC) • World Cinema Fund (WCF) Support to cultural and creative industries: • Central Africa: Interarts foundation, ECCAS, the French association Culture et développement, and the National Institute of Arts in Kinshasa. • Eastern African: British Council and the HEVA Fund, • Western Africa: French Institute and the Kôrè Cultural Centre, Mali. • Southern Africa: Music in Africa and the Goethe Institute • Caribbean: UNESCO, the University of the West Indies and Caricom • Pacific: the South Pacific Community and Queensland University of Technology
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
40 Mil. USD = 32.94 Mil. EUR
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Organisation of the African, Caribbean, Pacific States
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Organisation internationale de la francophonie (OIF)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Centre National du Cinema (CNC)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
World Cinema Fund (WCF)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Central Africa: Interarts foundation, ECCAS, the French association Culture et développement, and the National Institute of Arts in Kinshasa.
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Eastern African: British Council and the HEVA Fund
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Western Africa: French Institute and the Kôrè Cultural Centre, Mali
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Southern Africa: Music in Africa and the Goethe Institute
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Caribbean: UNESCO, the University of the West Indies and Caricom
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Pacific: the South Pacific Community and Queensland University of Technology
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

EU-UNESCO Expert Facility

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission’s DG for International Partnerships
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
This programme aims to support developing countries within a timeframe of 18-24 months to: • Design, adapt and/or implement regulatory frameworks (laws, strategies, policies and measures) for the CCIs, including intellectual property rights related to CCIs. • Strengthen skills and capacities to support long-term cultural policy development and implementation that support the CCIs. • Create peer-to-peer mechanisms to strengthen institutional capacities for the CCIs through South-South cooperation activities
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Selection of 12 beneficiary countries, selection of experts providing assistance, set-up of country teams for the peer-to-peer exchanges, diagnostics of country needs. The current beneficiary countries are Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Jamaica, Mexico, Namibia, Palestine, Panama, South Sudan, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Previous beneficiaries (since the EU-UNESCO Expert Facility was launched 2010) have been Argentina, Barbados, Malawi, Kenya, Honduras, Niger, Burkina Faso, Vietnam, Haiti, Mauritius, Seychelles, Cambodia, The Democratic Republic of Congo. This means the EU-UNESCO Expert Facility has now supported implementation of the UNESCO 2005 Convention in 25 countries in all 5 UNESCO regions.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
1.72 Mil. USD = 1.4 Mil. EUR
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
UNESCO
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Transcultura Programme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission’s DG for International Partnerships
UNESCO
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
This programme seeks to deepen integration between Cuba, the Caribbean and the European Union. It aims to harness diversity and build bridges between people and cultures from different linguistic areas.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Launched the first Cultural Heritage and Cultural and Creative Industries Training Advisory Board in the Caribbean
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
18 Mil. USD
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
UNESCO Regional Office for Culture in Latin America and the Caribbean, with the support of the UNESCO Cluster Office in Jamaica, the UNESCO National Office in Haiti and the EU offices in the region.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Innovative Financing Initiative for Culture (IFIC)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission’s DG for International Partnerships
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Specific objectives are: • Improve access to finance for MSMEs and organisations from the culture and creative sectors, in particular those led by women and vulnerable groups. • Increase the value, quality and quantity of cultural goods and services in target countries. HEVA Fund’ activities include: • Selection of cultural and creative entrepreneurs to be financed • Technical assistance: (i) to the applicants and (ii) ecosystem capacity support. • Advocacy and support to public policies in favor of the CCI sector. Several studies on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the CCI sector will be also published. Ciné Guimbi Cultural Hub’s activities include: • Restoration of the historic Guimbi cinema (movie theatre of 174 seats, restaurant, offices). • Incubator program in partnership with local entrepreneurs • Cultural activities (promotion of African cinema through screenings) • Capacity building programs to the sector professionals • Image education activities with local schools and youth organizations.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The project started in January 2020. The action is already supporting 31 cultural operators, in the cultural and creative industries. CCI surveys were carried out in 5 East African countries. The Cine-Guimbi hosted 3 cultural and creative activities.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
1.8 Million USD
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Agence Francaise de Developpement
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
HEVA Fund
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
Cine Guimbi Cultural Hub managed by the Association de Soutien du Cinema au Burkina Faso
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

Culture 2030 Indicators: Measuring Culture’s contribution to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission’s DG for International Partnerships
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The purpose of the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators is to measure and monitor the role and contribution of culture to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. The proposed project envisages a comparative analysys of the implementation of the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators at both the national and city levels in six pilot countries and cities. Objectives: • Refine the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators framework and methodology (including identyfing experts, developing training materials, reinforcing local capacities). • Implementthe UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators in 6 pilot countries and their 6 pilot cities, testing both the indicators and the methodology (tentatively selected as Burkina Faso, Costa Rica, Morocco, Portugal, Romania, and Vietnam). • Collect and analyze data and present it to inform decision-makers as well as reporting including Voluntary National Reports (VNRs) and Voluntary Local Reviews (VLRs) at the national and urban levels to the UN High Level Political Forum on SDGs in New York.
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Project started in January 2021
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
242.840 USD
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
UNESCO
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

PROCULTURA – Promotion of employment in income generating activities in the cultural sector in PALOP (African Portuguese-Speaking Countries) and East Timor

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission’s DG for International Partnerships
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The project will focus on job and income generation, by: • Reinforcing skills and technical competences available in the cultural sector; • Enhancing diffusion and commercialisation of PALOP-TL cultural products, in particular for music, and performing arts sectors which are at the core of PALOP-TL countries' cultural identity, at national, regional and international level; • Reinforcing PALOP-TL common cultural identity through the creation and diffusion of children and youth literature and publications.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
• Selection of 12 cultural projects for the creation or improvement of technical-professional and professional education courses. • Provision of 81 scholarships for higher education, postgraduate studies and artistic residencies in the fields of music and performing arts. • Delivery of five training courses on cultural entrepreneurship and funding sources to 183 development leaders in the cultural sectors (public, civil society and entrepreneurs). • Financing of 42 small initiatives and projects contributing to cultural diversity, citizenship and identity. • Delivery of six training actions on pedagogy and didactics of children's and youth literature to 194 teachers and educators
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
23.12 million USD
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
• Reinforce capacity building on entrepreneurship and ensure continuous support to funded projects through mentoring strategies and more involvement of national trainers. • Reinforce the scope, goals and budget for the artistic creation hubs. • Allocate budget to the development of structured projects by key institutions in the PALOP public cultural sector. • Ensure greater complementarity between all the activities and partners. • Complement the training in pedagogy and didactics of children's and youth literature, with other activities such as the development of writing workshops for writers and the strengthening of national writers' associations in their capacity to support literary production and dissemination.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Camões - Institute for Cooperation and Language, I.P. (management and cofinancing)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation (cofinancing)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
ABC – Brazilian Cooperation Agency
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
ACEP - Association for the Cooperation of the People
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
AECID - Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
AULP - Association of Universities of Portuguese Language
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
CPLP – Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
EUNIC – EU National Institutes for Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Identity Building and Sharing Business Initiative: an Ethical and “Glocal” Approach to Job Creation and Sustainable Development

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission’s DG for International Partnerships
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EU Identity Building and Sharing Initiative contributes to socio-economic development through human capital investment in the cultural and creative sectors, which are mobilized as factors of business development and identity building. Concurrently, the project addresses the root causes of irregular economic migration and displacement by strengthening the identity building sectors in countries with fragile situation and address the lifestyle market’s value chains. The project uses the methodology developed by the Ethical Fashion Initiative (EFI), a flagship programme of the International Trade Centre (ITC) that enables artisans living in urban and rural poverty to connect top luxury lifestyle brands, and that supports the rising generation of fashion talents from. The Identity Building and Sharing Business Initiative expands the EFI approach to a wider number of countries and to a wider range of creative industries through an integrated, comprehensive approach investing simultaneously in market access and in identity building, with special attention to fragile countries. The project is implemented in Kenya, Uganda, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Iran, Ivory Coast, Mali and Eritrea. The project intends to produce increased investment in human and social capital in the creative economies and in marginalized segments of the society, with value of human capital investment in target countries equal to 20.000.000 USD.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The project achieved: Number of jobs consolidated (sustained) for artisans from marginalized communities  782 (of which 633 women) Number of supply chains managed by social enterprises, enabling artisans from marginalized communities to be involved  67 Number of creative talents, artisans and designers involved in the value chains of the lifestyle market  3506 (of which 2006 women) Number of emerging designers mentored and exposed to the market  66 Number of international cultural events promoted  13 Number of local talents mentored and exposed for the market  1666
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
11.9 million USD (11.700.00,00 EU Contribution; 158.000,00 EUR ITC Contribution)
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
International Trade Center
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Silk Road Heritage Corridors in Afghanistan, Central Asia and Iran – International Dimension of the European Year of Cultural Heritage

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Delegation of the European Union to Kazakhstan
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Overall Objective of the project is to support the cultural diversity and the understanding of the cultural heritage along the Silk Roads as a means of contributing to sustainable development, in particular to job creation through local development strategies and sustainable tourism, skills development and knowledge exchanges and cross-fertilization of heritage with Cultural and Creative Industries (CCIs). The project is articulated along four Specific Objectives: 1. To implement and promote, locally and internationally, concrete projects of valorisation of tangible and intangible heritage in the different participating countries; 2. To use cultural heritage as a foundation for inclusive sustainable development job-creation and social cohesion; 3. To strengthen human and institutional capacities of participating partner countries for the safeguarding of tangible and intangible cultural heritage; 4. To promote and facilitate partnerships and improve communication on the understanding, safeguarding and protection of common cultural heritage through awareness-raising initiatives.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
1. Significant progress was made with rehabilitation of the number of World Heritage and cultural sites: Phase II was completed in Kyrgyzstan (Second Buddhist Temple, at Krasnaya Rechka), Phase I was completed and Phase II launched in Uzbekistan (Bogbonli mosque, Itchan kala, Khiva); rehabilitation of four domes of Yengi Emam Caravansary in Alborz province, Iran was completed 2. Information panels at 11 component sites of WH listed Tian-Shan corridor in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan were installed. 3. Creative, crafts and entrepreneurial skills of 220 craftspeople, including youth from local communities were developed in Afghanistan and Uzbekistan. 4. 7 draft Management Plans for the sites on the World Heritage (WH) and Tentative Lists of Kyrgyzstan were finalized and are ready to be submitted to the relevant national authorities for their consideration and approval. 5. Capacities of 130 persons on the management of WH sites and cultural tourism were strengthened 6. Technical expertise of 137 ICH bearers (of whom 63 women) from local communities in ICH inventorying was strengthened in Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan; 7. Capacities of 71 tourism guides of Central Asia and Iran were developed. 8. Awareness of over 1500 schoolchildren and young people raised about Shyrdak and Ala-Kiyiz, the Kyrgyz felt-carpet making traditions included in UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding. 9. Capacities of 57 WH site managers, tourism experts, representatives of national authorities from CA countries on destination management planning were developed. 10. 12 new Intangible Cultural Heritage elements were documented and presented at the follow-up training in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan; 4 new elements documented in Tajikistan were agreed to be included in the National List of ICH elements. 11. Over 1,707, 502 people were reached via social media and online platforms with communication on the common heritage along the Silk Roads. 12. The network of national museums from 7 countries involved in the development of the joint travelling exhibition established and the foundation built for these museums to join the international network of museums through ICOM-ICEE membership.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
5.34 million USD
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
UNESCO
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

ENP – Programme to Support Youth and Culture in the Southern Neighbourhood

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
-
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Programme to Support Youth and Culture in the Southern Neighbourhood The overall objective of the Youth and Culture programme is to promote youth and culture as vectors of democratisation, inclusive economic growth, regional integration and resilience in ENP South countries. Funded by the DG NEAR (Neighbourhood and Enlargdment Negotiations), this programme has 2 main components: 1) Youth: To promote the active participation of young people in building inclusive and democratic societies. Youth include the age group between 18-30 years. 2) Culture: To enhance the role of culture as a vector for employment and resilience in the Southern Neighbourhood. The programme encompasses all countries of the Southern Neighbourhood: Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan, and the diaspora from Syria and Libya. In total, 3 projects are currently implemented under the programme. • CREACT4MED (2020-2023): CREACT4MED (CReative Entrepreneurs ACTing FOR the future MEDiterranean)aims to enhance the role of culture and creativity as a vector for employment and resilience in eight South Neighbourood countries. For more info, click here. • Thaqafa Daayer Maydoor (2020-2024): Thaqafa Daayer Maydoor (All-Around Culture) fosters a cultural ecosystem as an enabling environment for social and economic inclusion of young people in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan, and the diaspora from Syria and Libya. For more info, click here. • • SAFIR (2020-2024): SAFIR is an EU-funded project supporting youth and the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 9 countries across Northern Africa and the Middle East. For more info, click here. -
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

ENP - MED Culture (2014-18)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
-
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Med Culture was a 5-year regional programme funded by the EU to accompany partner countries in south of the Mediterranean in the development and improvement of cultural policies and practices related to the culture sector. The approach was consultative/participative and takes place in partnership with civil society actors, ministries, private and public institutions involved in culture as well as other related sectors. The countries involved were Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Tunisia, Palestine, and Libya.
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

ENP – Eastern Partnership EU4Culture programme (2019-)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
-
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Eastern Partnership (EaP) is a joint policy initiative which aims to deepen and strengthen relations between the European Union (EU), its Member States and its six Eastern neighbours: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. EU4Culture programme (2019-) aims to strengthen the links between culture, economic growth and the promotion of intercultural dialogue and experiences in the Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries. It will focus on cooperation on cultural heritage, intercultural dialogue for peaceful inter-community relations, on new innovative creative industries, regional cultural markets, and cultural associations and intermediary institutions. https://www.euneighbours.eu/en/east/stay-informed/projects/eu4culture
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Western Balkans Cultural Programme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
-
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Western Balkans Cultural Programme aims to support the creative and cultural sectors (CCS) in the Western Balkans and to promote good neighbourly cooperation through culture. The programme is designed in co-delegation with DG EAC (Education and Culture) which is implementing the programme, while DG NEAR (Neighbourhood and Enlargement Negotiations) provides financial support. The programme has been postponed due to COVID-19 restrictions and should be launched in 2021.
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

EU-LAC-MUSEUMS (Horizon 2020 project, full name Museums and Community: Concepts, Experiences, and Sustainability in Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean).

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Research Executive Agency (implementation)
European Commission Research & Innovation Directorate-General (creation of Work Programme)
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EU-LAC-MUSEUMS project directly met the challenge of fostering EU-CELAC relations by studying the close connections between Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) in the field of community museology. To address this challenge, EU-LAC-MUSEUMS assembles a team of leading academics, museum professionals and policy makers elected by the European and LAC Regional Alliances of the International Council of Museums (ICOM) (www.icom.museum). They are committed to exploring the cultural, scientific and social dimensions of EU-LAC relations with a view to “supporting the process of EU-CELAC cooperation outlined by the EU-CELAC Action Plan 2013-2015 in defining a common vision for the years to come”. Through a series of thematic work packages the project pursued the theme of “Museums and Community: Concepts, Experiences, and Sustainability in Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean”. A good deal of research has been carried out into this subject at local, national, and regional levels in both EU and LAC, but a concerted bi-regional investigation is yet to appear. EU-LAC-MUSEUMS overcame this gap in knowledge by creating parity of esteem and sustainable dialogue and co-operation between academia, museums and communities in each region. It achieved this goal by pursuing work packages dealing with the cross cutting societal challenges of: a) "Technology and Innovation for Bi-Regional Integration" b) "Museum Education for Social Inclusion and Cohesion" c) "Investment and Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Museums”, and d) “Exhibiting Migration and Gender”. In so doing, they push forward the agenda of the EU-CELAC Action Plan in museum practice and theory and the promotion and protection of cultural diversity.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Documents, reports (14) Other (5) Demonstrators, pilots, prototypes (3) Websites, patent fillings, videos etc. (17) Publications: Peer reviewed articles (6) Monographic books (2) See: https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/693669/results
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$ 2 882 000
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The project has delivered exceptional results with significant immediate or potential impact. Overall, the project has fully achieved its objectives and milestones at this final project’s period. During the last period the EULAC project has met all of the initially proposed objectives of the Description of Action, as reflected by the high quality of the deliverables and milestones and, in general, by all the outputs delivered by the various project teams.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
THE UNIVERSITY COURT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS, UK
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
DIRECAO GERAL DO PATRIMONIO CULTURAL Portugal
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES U WI* Jamaica
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
PONTIFICIA UNIVERSIDAD CATOLICA DEL PERU Peru
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
UNIVERSITAT DE VALENCIA Spain
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
MUSEO NACIONAL DE COSTA RICA Costa Rica
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Universidad Austral de Chile Chile
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
CONSEIL INTERNATIONAL MUSEES France

EULAC-Focus (Giving focus to the Cultural, Scientific and Social Dimension of EU – CELAC Relations)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Research Executive Agency (implementation of the project)
DG RTD (Creation of the Work Program
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
EULAC Focus is a collaborative research project involving partners in EU Member States and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC). It delivers a significant contribution to the improvement of EU–CELAC relations through a better understanding of the three dimensions selected by the call: cultural, scientific and social. The main objective is that of “giving focus” to these three dimensions of EU–CELAC relations, with a view to determining synergies and cross-fertilization, as well as identifying asymmetries in bi-lateral and bi-regional relations. Research is focused on areas crucial to explain the current state of relations between the EU and LAC (Latin America and Caribbean), and will be pursued at two levels: a) research activities; b) strategic set of recommendations. In order to guarantee high impact, the research is pursued in six interdisciplinary WPs, organized “matricially”. Three are “horizontal ”: Cross-cutting pathways, Towards a common vision for EU–CELAC and Dissemination and outreach. The other three are “thematic/vertical”: cultural, scientific and social Dimension, and not only intersect the horizontal WPs but also interact between them. To achieve the objectives, the project is organized by the multidisciplinary and well balanced consortium of19 members from 15 counties. The consortium represents a unique group of highly competent and experienced institutions, composed specifically for the purpose of this project, comprising, in both regions, government research agencies, research institutes, universities, university association, and two international european – LA organizations active in analytical and policy oriented research and dissemination. EULAC Focus builds upon the outcomes of prior mapping conducted at the bi-regional level and will facilitate access to end-users, as well as feeding into the work of the EU-LAC Foundation and informing bi-regional networking activities of the JIRI and T-AP’s work. The number of partners has been carefully defined to ensure project goals and proper diversity, while allowing for efficient project management. The project partners are: -UNIVERSITAT DE BARCELONA Spain -SAMUI FRANCE SARL France -DEUTSCHES ZENTRUM FUR LUFT - UND RAUMFAHRT EV Germany -ZENTRUM FUR SOZIALE INNOVATION GMBH Austria -METCENAS OPS Czechia -STIFTUNG PREUSSISCHER KULTURBESITZ Germany -NEDERLANDSE ORGANISATIE VOOR WETENSCHAPPELIJK ONDERZOEK Netherlands -FUNDACAO DE APOIO A UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO Brazil -UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL AUTONOMA DE MEXICO Mexico -THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES U WI* Jamaica -UNIVERSIDAD DE INVESTIGACION DE TECNOLOGIA EXPERIMENTAL YACHAY Ecuador -UNIVERSIDAD DE BUENOS AIRES Argentina -UNIVERSIDAD DE CHILE Chile -PONTIFICIA UNIVERSIDAD CATOLICA DEL PERU Peru -Consejo Superior Universitario Centroamericano Guatemala -Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva Argentina -SECRETARIA NACIONAL DE CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGIA Ecuador -ORGANIZACION DE ESTADOS IBEROAMERICANOS PARA LA EDUCACION LA CIENCIA Y LA CULTURA Spain -INSTITUTO ITALO-LATINO AMERICANO Italy -MINISTERIO DE CIENCIA, TECNOLOGIA E INNOVACION Argentina
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Documents, reports (22) Open Research Data Pilot (2) Websites, patent fillings, videos etc. (2) Publications Peer reviewed articles (3) Book chapters (3) Conference proceedings (2) Monographic books (3) Non-peer reviewed articles (2)
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$ 3 054 730
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The project has achieved most of its objectives and milestones for the period with relatively minor deviations. Contribution to the state of the art was achieved on EU-LAC cooperation research, delivering valuable studies and reports that include policy recommendations about the future of the bi-regional cooperation. The outputs reached are valuable towards reshaping EU-CELAC relations, especially in the three dimensions covered by the project action (social, cultural and scientific). The report on the cultural dimension includes direct references to the 2005 UNESCO convention.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
20 research, government and cultural institutions in 17 countries (listed above)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

European Spaces of Culture

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission (DG EAC)
EU National Institutes for Culture (EUNIC Global)
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Preparatory Action European Spaces of Culture tests innovative collaboration models in cultural relations between European and local partner organisations in countries outside the EU. At the heart of the project lies a new spirit of dialogue, in which equality, mutual listening and learning represent the core values that help build trust and understanding between peoples. As a Preparatory Action, it was initiated by the European Parliament. By gathering policy recommendations, the project contributes to the implementation of the EU strategy for international cultural relations. Phase 1 of the action ran from 2018-2021. Phase 2 and 3 will be implemented in 2021-2023.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Under the first phase of European Spaces of Culture, six pilot projects were implemented from 2019- April 2021: - In Benin, the Urban Cult Lab’Africa has brought together six fab labs – digital fabrication laboratories – in West Africa to co-design cultural events including artists’ residencies, live events and exhibitions. - Triángulo Teatro (Central American European Theatre Circuit) is a programme of theatrical performances which revolve around the contemporary interpretation of European dramatic art. It is a cooperation between El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. - In Ethiopia, Tibeb be Adebabay (Amharic for ‘Art in Public Space’) is a participatory street festival staged in Meskel Square, the main public square in Addis Abeba. - Nogoonbaatar Eco Art Festival, the first of its kind in Mongolia, aims to change the critical situation of air pollution in the Ger District, notorious for heavy pollution through coal burning. - In the USA, The Grid incorporates art-thinking into the development of new technologies, jump-starting a conversation between artists, technologists, and policy makers from Europe, Silicon Valley and beyond. - In Sri Lanka, the next Colomboscope festival offers opportunities for creative producers to have a horizontal exchange on creative questions as well as topics of socio-political urgency. It includes professional development workshops, mentoring circles, and in-tandem residencies across four regions. A mapping looked at past and current practice of European collaboration in culture, over the past 30 years, both inside and outside of the EU, realised by EUNIC members as well as by other actors or organisations (e.g. civil society). A high-level conference presented the results on 1 June 2021. Policy recommandations are in preparation.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$ 892 500
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
EU Delegations in partner countries
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Civil Society Organizations in partner countries
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Cultural Diplomacy Platform (CDP) and Cultural Relations Platform (CRP)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
EU Service for Foreign Policy Instruments (FPI)
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The CDP was an EU-funded project supporting international cultural relations and cooperation between European and global cultural and creative sectors for the period 2016-2020. Its successor is the CRP for the period 2020-23. The Platform’s mission is to strengthen the EU’s ability to engage meaningfully with different audiences and stakeholders in its partner countries, through enhanced cultural relations and cultural cooperation. The Cultural Relations Platform provides policy support for EU institutions, organises events and trainings for cultural professionals, builds communities of cultural practitioners and facilitates cultural relations and cooperation between European and non-European actors active in the cultural and creative sectors (CCSs). One of the most successful projects has been the Global cultural leadership programme, focusing on emerging cultural leaders from the EU and partner countries.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Studies, leadership programmes, events, mappings. (For more details please see the separate section/measure in this report on International civil society dialogue and exchange).
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
$ 5 800 000
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Goethe-Institut, Germany
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Sienna University, Italy
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
IETM, Belgium (International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
European Cultural Foundation, Netherlands
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Goal 4 - Promote Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Gender Equality

Ministries, governmental agencies and/or parliamentary bodies in charge of gender equality: 
-
Policies and measures to support the full participation of women in cultural life have been implemented during the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures have been adopted to support the recognition and advancement of women as artists, cultural professionals and/or creative entrepreneurs, (e.g. ensure equal pay for equal work or equal access to funding, coaching or mentoring schemes, anti-discrimination measures, etc.): 
YES
Data is regularly collected and disseminated to monitor: 
Gender equality in the culture and media sectors
Participation of women in cultural life
Percentage of women/men in decision-making /managerial positions in public and private cultural and media: 
Please see statistics presented under the measures described below, and in the Eurostat publication Culture Statistics - 2019 edition, annexed to this report.
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Culture and Gender Equality – EU Gender Equality Strategy, Presidency Conclusions

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The European Union Gender Equality Strategy adopted in March 2020 seeks significant progress towards a gender-equal Europe by 2025. The Strategy presents policy objectives and actions to deliver on the commitment of the von der Leyen Commission to achieve a Union of Equality. It states that all citizens, regardless of their sex, gender identity and expression, sex characteristics, sexual identity; racial or ethnic origin, age, religion or belief and any disability, must be able to pursue their chosen path in life and have equal opportunities to thrive, participate and lead. It recognizes the role of the media and the cultural sectors in shaping people’s beliefs, values and perception of reality, and are thus further key channels for changing attitudes and challenging stereotypes. In this document, the Commission commits itself to continue supporting projects promoting gender equality under Creative Europe Programme, including under Music Moves Europe. It also announced that it will present a gender equality strategy in the audio-visual industry as part of the next MEDIA sub-programme, including financial support, structured dialogue, mentoring and training for women film-makers, producers and screenwriters. Presidency Conclusions on gender equality in the field of culture adopted in December 2020, underline the potential of culture to advance gender equality and acknowledge persistent gender inequalities in the sector. This document refers in particular to obstacles related to - equal access to the cultural and creative labour market - equal payment and representation in creative and decision-making positions - equal appreciation and recognition of work It emphasises that gender stereotyping and sexual harassment and abuse remain major concerns in the cultural and creative sectors. The Presidency Conclusions invite the EU Member States amongst others - to ensure equal pay - to promote a better work-life balance - to guarantee gender equality in the institutions and decision-making bodies of the sector - to promote research on gender equality and the collection of sex-disaggregated data in the field of culture The European Commission (EC) is called upon to support transnational initiatives on gender equality in the field of culture and to promote the collection and distribution of culture-specific data on gender equality and cultural diversity in Europe. Creative Europe projects Several projects promoting gender equality have received co-funding under the Creative Europe programme, including a flagship initiative in the music sector – the Keychange project. Keychange is an international campaign that encourages music festivals, orchestras, conservatoires, broadcasters, concert halls, agents, record labels and music organisations to pledge their commitment to achieving a 50:50 gender balance by 2022. The new Creative Europe programme foresees strengthening the role of gender equality across beneficiary projects.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO

Culture and Gender Equality – Study

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
European Expert Network on Culture & Audiovisual
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EU Council Work Plan for Culture 2019-2022 identified gender equality as one of six sectoral priorities for EU action, and invited the Commission to produce a study and convene a Working Group of Member State experts under the Open Method of Coordination (described separately). The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review and prepare a study identifying the situation of women artists and professionals in the cultural and creative sectors (CCSs), and to map the existing international recommendations aiming to achieve gender equality in these sectors. The study summarises the main policy developments and recommendations made regarding cultural and creative sectors (CCSs), and gender by bodies such as the EU, the Council of Europe, UNESCO, and the ILO. Its main focus is on understanding the current state of affairs concerning women in the CCSs, the gender gaps at work, and the underlying drivers of those gender gaps. Available quantitative data has been mapped for the different sub-sectors within the CCSs, and has been combined with information from qualitative literature and expert interviews to establish the state of affairs regarding women in these sectors, along with the drivers leading to this state of affairs. The report provides an overall analysis of gender gaps in the CCSs as a whole and presents examples of the types of initiatives which have been implemented to address these gender gaps. The report culminates in a series of conclusions and recommendations for the reflection of the OMC Working Group. In September 2020, an updated version of this study was published, to include the audiovisual and radio sectors.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The study was disseminated widely and promoted by the Commission in discussions with the European Parliament and UNESCO (2005 Convention 8th Conference of Parties). Key findings are set out below: Gender inequality in the cultural and creative sectors Intersectional gender gaps persist in almost all cultural and creative sectors, with individuals experiencing discrimination based on their gender, other personal characteristics and identities. The available data shows that female artists and cultural professionals across the EU typically have less access to creation and production resources, are paid much less than men and are underrepresented in leadership and other decision-making positions, as well as on the art market. Women are frequently victims of sexism, gender stereotypes and sexual harassment. In France, for example, women constitute 52% of all Performing Arts students. However, they comprise only 31% of practicing artists, 11% of programmed artists and hold only 18% of managerial positions in these sectors. Only 4 - 12% of art awards have been granted to women since 1980. Furthermore, 23% of projects supported by public funds in France are led by women. Women with the same competences or job earn on average 27% less than male artists (source: ‘Inégalités entre les femmes et les hommes dans les arts et la culture’, Haut Conseil à l’Égalité, 2018). Music: In Europe, women represent 20% or less of registered composers and songwriters and, on average, earn 30% less than men working within the sector (source: ‘Women in Music’, 2019). Theatre: In Ireland, women are underrepresented in every theatre role studied, with the exception of costume designers. Only 28% of script authors, 9% of sound designers and 37% of directors are women (source: Research commissioned by #WakingtheFeminists, 2017). Circus: In Spain, the employment of women is notably reduced in companies that are economically stronger. 80% of artists on stage are men, versus 20% women. Show directors are nearly all men (source: Research by the Associació de Professionals de Circ de Catalunya (APCC), 2019). Visual arts: Artwork by female artists represented only 3 - 5% of major permanent collections in Europe and the United States (USA) in 2017. At the same time, only 13.7% of living artists represented by galleries in Europe and North America are women (source: National Museum of Women in the Arts (USA), 2019). More data is needed regarding gender inequalities faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQI) persons across the EU.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
54,700
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The study itself included the following recommendations, addressed to policymakers and practioners in the CCS: - set up initiatives and practices to monitor the sector more closely. In order to design useful policies, this should be a first step. In pursuit of this aim, collaboration with other institutes active on this issue could be a sensible first step. Organisations such as the European Network of Observatories in the Arts and Cultural Education (ENO), sectoral organisations such as the ACE, and other sectoral networks, associations, and institutes across Europe could be brought together to share their insights and their data regarding the position of women in the CCSs. This could be combined with the information which is collected by other EU agencies such as EACEA, Eurofound, and EIGE. - think in terms of two tracks: a longer term and short term approach: o One the one hand, a long-term approach can be taken which seeks to adjust the social norms and values, and thereby, the expectations regarding women in European societies. On the other hand, more short term and instrumental approaches can be taken which address and mitigate the positions of women in this sector at the moment and in the near future. - promote awareness (which can be achieved through a variety of practices), and to commit to making gender gaps more visible within the CCSs and in society more broadly by reporting on the sector. Working to improve the representation of women in different types of occupations across the CCSs should also be addressed in this context, and there are a variety of different initiatives and practices available to help do so. - better support parents working in the CCSs, and mothers in particular. Hiring and recruitment practices, as well as other sectoral working practices could be examined from within the sector, to facilitate women wishing to or already working in the CCS - the European Commission should continue to act as a facilitator, to bring together existing data and information which is currently collected in different Member States and sub-sectors of the CCSs. Based on which information is collected and that which is not, countries, sectoral organisations, and authorities can come together to consider how to improve the data collection for the CCSs. In building better insights concerning the state of affairs in the CCSs, EU and national authorities are in a better position to take tailored, relevant action to address gender gaps in these sectors
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
European Expert Network on Culture and Audiovisual
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

Culture and Gender Equality – OMC Working Group (report)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The 2019-2022 Work Plan for Culture recognizes that gender equality is a pillar of cultural diversity and has a key role to play in challenging stereotypes and promoting societal change. The Work Plan recommends two actions to tackle gender gaps in the cultural and creative sectors in the EU - mapping the situation of female artists and cultural professionals (this is the study described above) - convening a working group of Member States experts under the Open Method of Coordination (OMC) to exchange experiences, good practices and to formulate recommendations The Open Method of Coordination (OMC) expert group on gender equality was convened by the European Commission and worked between autumn 2019 and spring 2021 to suggest a set of policy recommendations and actions in response to these challenges under the new Creative Europe programme. The group met 5 times in 2019 and 2020. 22 Member States nominated experts (30 in total), and the group gathered over 80 best practices from EU Member States. Drafting subgroups were set up in line with the report’s chapters (introduction, data collection, history of women in arts and culture, impact of COVID crisis on gender equality in the cultural and creative sectors, gender stereotypes, sexual violence, access to the labour market and gender pay gap, access to resources and arts market, access to decision-making and leadership positions). The group invited a series of external speakers, including from the EENCA, Eurostat, EIGE, European Audiovisual Observatory, and from other Commisison services (DG JUST, DG CNECT). Some members of the OMC group participated in November 2019 in the dialogue between the Commission and the Voices of Culture (VoC) representatives to listen to recommendations of the cultural and creative sector organizations participating in that process Some experts of the OMC group were also involved in the negotiation of the Presidency Conclusions on gender equality in the CCS adopted in December 2020.
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The key outcome of the OMC group’s work is the report, “Towards gender equality in the cultural and creative sectors” published in June 2021. Results from the OMC informed, inter alia, the Portuguese Presidency Conference on Social Cohesion (dedicated session on gender equality), on 5-6 May 2021. The report focusses on the following key challenges: gender stereotypes sexual harassment access to the labour market and the gender pay gap access to resources access to leadership positions and female entrepreneurship. In addition to a general overview of the status quo of gender equality in the cultural and creative sectors, including the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, this report details extensive recommendations and good practices on how to implement these. The report is addressed at all policy makers and people in positions of power, as well as the cultural and creative sectors, the media, and the education sector. The report recommends improved collection of reliable and comparable data on the gender gaps across the EU the importance of using gender-sensitive language implementing gender equality in the workplace as well as gender budgeting and gender mainstreaming methodologies. The EC launched the ‘Women on the move’ day in 2019 to discuss the issue of gender balance in the cultural and creative sectors. In follow-up to this, the EC published an overview of good practices from the audio-visual industry to be replicated across Member States. The issue of gender balance in the cultural and creative sectors was also discussed in 2019 between the EC and cultural and creative sectors stakeholders as part of the ‘Voices of culture’ structured dialogue, which gathered 36 sector representatives from across the EU.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Artistic Freedom

The constitution and/or national regulatory frameworks formally acknowledge: 
The right of artists to create without censorship or intimidation
The right of artists to disseminate and/or perform their artistic works
The right for all citizens to freely enjoy artistic works both in public and in private
The right for all citizens to take part in cultural life without restrictions
Independent bodies are established to receive complaints and/or monitor violations and restrictions to artistic freedom: 
-
Initiatives to protect artists at risk or in exile have been developed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years (e.g. providing safe houses, guidance and training, etc.): 
-
Measures and initiatives intended to ensure transparent decision-making on government funding/ state grants and awards for artists exist (e.g. through independent committees, etc.): 
-
Social protection measures that take the professional status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. health insurance, retirement schemes, unemployment benefits, etc.): 
-
Economic measures that take the status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. collective agreements, income tax and other regulatory frameworks, etc.): 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

EU policy collaboration on artistic freedom

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
EU Member States
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The 2019-2022 Work Plan for Culture proposes a workshop should be held on artistic freedom, with reference to the UNESCO 2005 Convention. It also proposes a study should be commissioned in the related area of citizenship, values and democracy. The Commission is taking forward work in these areas. The 2020 report produced for the Commission on the status and working conditions of artists (described separately in this report) included a chapter on freedom of artistic creationand describing the international, European and EU legal framework, the current restrictions to artistic freedom of creation in Europe, and the impact on artists. It also proposed a number of recommendations. The Council’s conclusions of 18 May 2021 also invited EU Member States and the Commission to take appropriate steps to further encourage cooperation, including with third countries, and to facilitate the free movement of artists and CCS professionals, promoting exchanges, collaboration and artistic freedom by taking into account the general principles of free movement of persons and services.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO

EU study and policy collaboration on the status & working conditions of artists & cultural professionals

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
European Expert Network on Culture and Audiovisual
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Under the 2019-2022 Council Work Plan for Culture, the Commission launched a study on the Status and working conditions of artists and cultural and creative professionals, which was published in December 2020. The study was compiled by the European Expert Network on Culture and Audiovisual, in close collaboration with sectoral stakeholders including Culture Action Europe, the International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts, On The Move, PEARLE* and Freemuse. Some of the work conducted in the context of the study took place during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study explores the status and the working conditions of artists and creative professionals. This includes examination of the career paths of artists and cultural and creative professionals, including entrepreneurship, nature of income, and influence of the market, access to finance, social security and cross-border mobility. Working conditions of artists and CCS professionals is understood in a larger sense, including artistic freedom/restrictions to creation, the aspect of working conditions of disadvantaged groups, and the specific working conditions of young people (in particular with view to the gig/platform economy, precariousness due to project-oriented jobs and self-employment). The study also considers aspects of creative professions as hidden unemployment (creative entrepreneur not out of free will but due to the impossibility to get another job and part-time employment traps for women with children, etc.), as well as the physical places and conditions where work of artists and CCS professionals takes place. Finally the study includes 9 pages of recommendations to the EU, Member States and CCS stakeholders, in the following categories - general improvements to status and working conditions - cross-border mobility of artists and cultural and creative professionals - career development - funding - freedom of artistic expression
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The study was presented to the Council in early 2021, and has been disseminated by CCS networks and during high-level events at the European Parliament and at other occasions, receiving wide attention and interest. The EU delegation (represented by DG EAC) highlighted the study at the Intergovernmental Committee of the UNESCO 2005 Convention in February 2021. The study informed a Voices of Culture dialogue with cultural and creative sector organizations which took place in April and June 2021. Details of this process and its participants are available here (where the resulting brainstorming report will be published in due course): https://voicesofculture.eu/2021/01/25/status-and-working-conditions-of-artists-and-cultural-and-creative-professionals/ The study will also be the starting point for a new Working Group of Member States experts, under the 2019-2022 Work Plan for Culture, and as further described in the Council Conclusions of May 2021 on the recovery, resilience and sustainability of the cultural and creative sectors.

Measures and Initiatives reported by Civil Society Organizations

Describe how the CSO form has been used to promote collaboration with CSOs in the preparation of this report, including the distribution of the form and the modalities of collection and analysis of the information received. Please indicate the percentage of measures and initiatives received that have been considered as relevant by the Party and included in the QPR.: 
The CSO form has not been used in preparing this report. Please see the sections on multi-stakeholder consultations, partnerships with civil society for details of CSO input to the measures described, as well as descriptions under the individual measures.
GOAL 1 - Support sustainable systems of governance for culture: 
-
GOAL 2 - Achieve a balanced flow of cultural goods and services and increase the mobility of artists and cultural professionals: 
-
GOAL 3 - Integrate culture in sustainable development frameworks: 
-
GOAL 4 - Promote human rights and fundamental freedoms: 
-
On the basis of the analysis of the responses provided through the CSO form, present up to ten main priorities of CSOs to implement the Convention over the next four years.: 
-

Emerging Transversal Issues

Relevant Policies and Measures: 

COVID-19 - EU Guidelines for safe resumption of activities in cultural and creative sectors

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
European Commission
EU Member States
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In its Communication C(2021)4838 adopted in June 2021 (shortly before this report was submitted), the European Commission proposes coordinated measures aimed to ensure both the safe reopening and the sustainable recovery of cultural activities across the EU, in line with the specific national, regional and local conditions of the Coronavirus pandemic. The EU guidelines aim to provide a coordinated approach to orient the design and implementation of measures and protocols in EU countries to cover both the safe reopening as well as the sustainable recovery in the cultural and creative sectors. The European Commission publishes these guidelines at a time when the epidemiological situation is improving and COVID-19 vaccination campaigns are speeding up, Member States are gradually reopening cultural venues and activities. The guidelines are based on the expertise of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and exchanges with the EU Health Security Committee. They take into account the different epidemiological situations in the Member States and their evolution. They provide indicators and criteria (such as the viral circulation, the vaccination coverage, the use of protective measures, the use of tests and contact tracing), to be taken into account when planning the resumption of certain activities. The Commission also proposes a range of actions in the guidelines to ensure the sustainable recovery of the entire sector. These complement Member States’ and the sectors’ initiatives already taken to accompany the reopening of cultural venues. The Commission has taken measures to support Member States’ actions to address the consequences of the pandemic on the creative and cultural sectors. One next step will be the publication, in autumn 2021 of an online guide on EU funding for culture, covering all existing EU funds that Member States and the sector can use. The Commission is also working to support Member States and the cultural and creative sectors in their recovery from the pandemic, and resilience in rebuilding - including through the EU's Recovery and Resilience Facility and Member States' respective national plans.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Challenges and Achievements

Describe the main results achieved to implement the Convention (at least one major achievement in one of the four goals): 
Under Goal 1 of the 2005 UNESCO Convention, the EU has supported sustainable systems of governance for culture through • policy collaboration among EU Member States, under the New European Agenda for Culture and two Work Plans for Culture • programme funding – notably Creative Europe, whose budget was increased by 63% to EUR 2.4 billion from 2021-2027. • legislation - important revisions to the Audiovisual Media Services and Copyright Directives, to promote a more diverse audiovisual landscape and a fairer market place for online content, including for the remuneration of authors and performers • partnering with civil society in the EU and beyond - supporting 28 European Networks, 15 European Platforms and 10 Voices of Culture dialogues, new initiatives on Music Moves Europe and European Creative Hubs, the EU’s Cultural Diplomacy and Cultural Relations Platforms, Global Cultural Leadership Programme and European Development Days Under Goal 2, the EU has promoted balanced flows of cultural goods and services and increased mobility of artists through • programme support - notably the new i-Portunus scheme (from 2019) awarding mobility grants to artists, creators and cultural professionals from 41 countries • policy collaboration - sectoral social dialogues on audiovisual and live performance sectors, Music Moves Europe work including on a European music export strategy, EU Member States’ collaboration on audiovisual co-productions, and support to CSOs to publish advice on social security, artists’ taxation, VAT, live events and visas • international regulation - EU support for CITES Convention exemptions on musical instrument parts and accessories made from rosewood timber • treaties and agreements – continuing dialogues on culture in international trade, with 5 meetings during the reporting period on implementation of the EU-Korea and CARIFORUM-EU Protocols on Cultural Cooperation Under Goal 3, there has been great momentum during the reporting period in EU efforts to integrate culture in sustainable development, within the EU and externally, through • international cooperation – this report describes 14 EU measures worth over EUR 95 million to support culture, CCIs and implementation of the 2005 Convention in partner countries - including 5 directly with UNESCO (EU-UNESCO Expert Facility, Culture|2030 Indicators, ACP-EU Culture Programme and Transcultura in the Caribbean, Silk Road Heritage Corridors) • political commitments – Council Resolution on cultural dimension of sustainable development, amendment to Work Plan for Culture to convene working group of EU experts • civil society engagement – EU Voices of Culture dialogue on culture & SDGs • innovation – EU support to business partnerships between designers, creators, manufacturers and tech providers through the COSME programme for SMEs Under Goal 4, EU measures to promote human rights and fundamental freedoms have included • political commitments on an EU Gender Equality Strategy, Presidency Conclusions on Culture and Gender Equality • policy collaboration (studies and working groups) on status and working conditions of cultural and creative professionals, culture and gender equality, and artistic freedom • civil society engagement – EU Voices of Culture dialogues on gender equality and on the status and working conditions of artists • monitoring and evaluation of media pluralism and media freedom in all EU Member States, focusing on basic protection, market plurality, political independence and social inclusiveness
Describe the main challenges encountered to implement the Convention and the main solutions found or envisaged to overcome them: 
The pace and scope of content digitisation and organizational digitalisation. The EU has aimed to address this through legislation and guidance on copyright for the fair remuneration of artists, policy collaboration across sectors (Music Moves Europe, audiovisual coproductions) and funding support through Creative Europe, Erasmus+ and other EU programmes. COVID-19. The EU’s 2021 Annual Single Market Report confirmed that the CCSIs were among the hardest hit industrial ecosystems in the EU as a result of COVID-19 and related restrictions - particularly activities based on venues and visits. For example EU cinema operators reported a 70% drop in box office sales in 2020 and music venues a 76% drop in attendance (64% in revenues). There has also been a drop of around 35% in royalties collected by collective management organisations for EU authors and performers. The EU is supporting Member States’ recovery from the pandemic through a range of funds, most significantly the EUR 672 billion Recovery and Resilience Facility, under which the European Parliament, supported by the Commission, has called for Member States to allocate “2% for culture”. See also the Emerging Transversal Issues section for details of the recently adopted EU Guidelines for safe resumption of activities in the cultural and creative sectors. Articulating the aims of the 2005 Convention also remains challenging, including with respect to reporting, as its breadth and depth remain poorly understood. As a Party to the Convention the EU continues consistently to promote the diversity of cultural expressions to ensure it remains valued, economically and intrinsically.
Describe the steps planned in the next four years to further implement the Convention and the priority areas identified for future policy action based on the conclusions of the current reporting process: 
Next steps are a matter for EU political decision-making. Here we refer only to measures already agreed/communicated by the European Commission / EEAS: • COVID recovery and resilience – the Commission will work to support Member States and the cultural and creative sectors in their recovery from the pandemic and resilience in rebuilding - including through its Recovery and Resilience Facility and its repsetcive national palns , and the adoption on 29 June 2021 of EU guidelines for the safe resumption of activities in the cultural and creative sectors. The Creative Europe programme budget has been front-loaded to allow greater investment in its first two years (2021-2023) to support COVID recovery. In each year 2021-2025 there will continue to be annual programmes and calls under culture, media and cross-sectoral strands of the Creative Europe programme, in line with the Convention. • Work Plan for Culture – following a mid-term review and final report on the 2019-22 Work Plan by the European Commission, the Council of Ministers will negotiate a new Work Plan for Culture from 2023, to be adopted in late 2022. • Voices of Culture – remains the main framework for dialogue between EU civil society and the EC on culture. Key themes in 2021-2025 are likely to include COVID recovery and resilience, and UNESCO 2005 implementation. • Culture in external relations – the 2016 strategy will continue to be implemented, including through the EU-funded Cultural Relations Platform funded by the Partnership Instrument and the preparatory action European Spaces of Culture funded by the European Parliament and implemented by the EU National Institutes for Culture. • Sustainable Development Goals / Agenda 2030 – the Commission (DG INTPA) continues to fund UNESCO’s work on Culture 2030 Indicators. The Working Group of EU Member States experts on cultural dimensions of sustainable development, convened by the Commission, will produce a report by end 2022. • Implementation of the Convention in partner countries - the Commission will continue to support this, through the EU-UNESCO Expert Facility, but also through a range of other geographic and thematic cooperation programmes described in this report. • Status and working conditions of artists - the Commission will convene a working group of Member States’ experts on this topic from 2021-2023, building on the comprehensive recent report produced for the Commission by the European Expert Network on Culture and Audiovisual, and the current Voices of Culture dialogue. This work could contribute to a possible review of UNESCO’s 1980 Recommendation on the Status of the Artist. • Working Better Together initiative - the EU institutions, EU Member States and UNESCO have recently extended the WBT / Team Europe approach to the field of culture, and are starting to meet to shape and prioritise collaboration on the diversity of cultural expressions. The 2005 Convention and its standard-setting remain essential as a unique standard-setting regime helping to strengthen cultural governance in the EU and in partner countries.

Annexes

Please upload relevant documents (law, policy, agreement, regulation, strategy, etc.), studies and statistics in PDF format related to the implementation of the 4 goals and the 11 areas of monitoring of the Convention in your country. The documents should have been produced during the reporting period covered by this periodic report. Please provide the title and a description of the main content of the document in English or French.: 

Submission

Designated official signing the report: 
Title: 
Ms.
First name: 
Catherine
Family name: 
Magnant
Organization: 
European Commission, Directorate-General Education, Youth, Sport & Culture
Position: 
Head of Unit, Cultural Policy and Deputy to the Director
Date of submission: 
2021
Electronic Signature: