Quadrennial Periodic Report
Hungary 2020

Quadrennial Periodic Report - - 10/27/2020 - 15:27

General Information

Technical Information

Name of Party: 
Hungary
Date of Ratification: 
2008
Officially Designated Point of Contact of the Convention: 
-
Describe the multi-stakeholder consultation process established for the preparation of this report, including consultations with relevant ministries, public institutions, local governments and civil society organizations.: 
-
Executive summary: 

During the years that have passed since the ratification in 2008 of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (hereinafter Convention) and the submitting in 2018 of the second country report, the Hungarian State made efforts to act as actively as possibly in the interest of serving the purposes of the Convention both in Hungary and abroad, within the limits of its material and human resources and organisational capacities.

Hungary took several measures for the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions and for the support of intercultural dialogue. Among measures taken in Hungary, we can refer to the extension of archiving web contents concerning cultural minorities and basic cultural services to encourage cultural diversity. The Csoóri Sándor Program - launched in 2017 - is still the primary means of promoting folk culture both in Hungary and in Hungarian communities in the surrounding countries. In 2019, Hungary launched the Lázár Ervin Program, which provides all primary school students with the experience of attending theater, dance and circus performances, classical music concerts once a school year free of charge, regardless of social status and place of residence. The Déryné Program - launched in 2020 - delivers high-quality productions to small settlements lacking the possibilities to attend cultural events. The motto of the program is “Theater for everyone ". The Déryné Program consists of four sub-programs, simultaneously addressing stone theaters, creative associations, cultural consumers and the communities struggling with various barriers to cultural access. In the making of Hungarian acts, the Hungarian State always consults with the civil society, involving them in political decision-making in the field of Culture, according to the Legislation Act.

It emerged as a challenge during the application of the provisions of the Convention that Hungary had to find the balance in complying with its obligations arising from the provisions of the Convention and playing an active role in the protection of global cultural diversity between keeping its commitments proportionate with its possibilities and harmonising its own external policy purposes with those enshrined in the Convention.

In Hungary the pandemic entered and triggered effects and reactions in a similar way to most countries in Europe. Cultural institutions - like almost all public places - were closed down, events were cancelled or postponed, mobility was and still is limited, several artistic activities halted, home office mode and social distancing became the rule.

Suddenly, the world has changed, the focus and the rhythm of our lives, the values, the importance of mental well-being, and along with it, the media and cultural consumption of people took a big turn. After the first period of the quarantine, chaotic conditions slowly began to settle down, an agenda has been set, working according to a new schedule was planned. People have learnt to live according to a new plan to be able to take care of themselves and their loved ones. We have had to manage to work and, at the same time, to teach our children at home. The new obligations involved a higher level of stress greatly due to the uncertainty of the situation. Therefore, people somehow have had to find ways to recharge even if the usual social connections, programmes had to be substituted by different sources and forms than before.

From the beginning of the crisis, the State Secretariat for Cultural Affairs of the Ministry of Human Capacities has been at the cultural stakeholders’ disposal with regular sectorial videoconferences as well as with non-stop online and telephone access. The Government, realising the weight of the crisis, has decided on immediate general and sector-specific measures that react to the challenge.
According to a Government Decree of 5th April the deadline of all state-funded programmes and projects were extended with the duration of the emergency situation, including projects with a central budgetary funding which were launched under the emergency period.

Hungary's cultural government, as an important step in the restarting process, provides one billion Hungarian Forints (appr. 2,85 million EUR) to independent performers who have been left without income. The name of the programme is "Thank you, Hungary!" It is important to emphasize that we do not distribute aid, instead, we pre-finance future artistic productions: approximately 5,000 performances by about 3,000 artists. This way, when the pandemic ends, a national programme series involving around 2,000 settlements will be launched. Within the framework of this programme, our public institutions are free to choose from a central database among artistic productions when planning their cultural calendar.

The majority of theatres, concert halls, museums, as well as our libraries, archives and centres of community culture have offered free access to performances and virtual collections to spread knowledge and culture to the widest audiences, fully respecting the rights of authors. Public relations in the online space emerged thanks to social media and to the museum websites. An example is the virtual tour of the exhibition Variations on Realism - From Munkácsy to Mednyánszky in the Hungarian National Gallery. Some further outstanding examples are: the broadcasting of online performances by the Capital Circus of Budapest, performances of the Hungarian State Opera made available at their Spotify-page, access provided to more than 40 literary evenings at the Palace of Arts. The Hungarian National Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Petőfi Literary Museum or the Museum of Ethnography also offered online access to various exhibitions.

The direct connection provided by the online interfaces also carried the potential for dialogue and feedback, eg. via chatrooms. Spectators could write live comments to performances which gave a new perspective to the creative process. Video content offered by artists made the connection even more personal.

It is important to note that the suddenly accumulated cultural content led to an increasingly conscious selection, according to the value and quality of the digitally available material, generating competition in a good sense. Therefore, marketing and communication activities continued to be priorities at cultural institutions and companies. Also, waves of solidarity and empathy emerged for sectors in difficulty, including cultural institutions and artists.

A very important initiative is that Hungarian libraries started functioning as authentic information sources in connection with the epidemic, thus contributing to the prevention of spreading fake news. Despite the forced closure of the museums, the work in the background did not stop - the management of the collections and research tasks took place continuously. In order to work efficiently, the Museum Department of the Ministry of Human Capacities established a group dealing with museum pedagogy involving colleagues from many different museums. The Department cooperated even more closely with professional organizations during the epidemic. With their help, around 4,000 staff members and nearly 200 institutions were reached.

Several institutions, mainly in rural areas, were involved in providing assistance to those in need (participation in lunch delivery, cleaning, mask sewing, helping the elderly).
A training was launched to support the digital switchover by the Museum of Fine Arts. The Public Collection College of the National Cultural Fund has announced a new call for tenders for the implementation of virtual exhibitions. In addition, a new tender has emerged for the implementation of living history programmes involving actors.

In Hungary, on the 18 June, the state of emergency declared on March 11 to contain the spread of the coronavirus ended. Instead, the Hungarian government has introduced a state of pandemic preparedness across the entire country with the declaration of a “health crisis”. The government will review the necessity of the state of pandemic preparedness every three months, until December 18, 2020.

With the end of the state of emergency, all cultural institutions (including museums, libraries) could be reopened. However, specific regulations continue to apply, for example, regarding the number and distance of visitors, special seating arrangements or the necessity of wearing masks.

Unfortunately the year 2020 focusing on the mitigation of the negative circumstances of the pandemic. But in these horrific times we also provide what could be provide to help the victims of the cultural area, and to fulfill our obligations according to the Convention.

Contact details of the stakeholders involved in the preparation of the quadrennial periodic report (QPR). Please also include the contact details of the civil society organizations (CSOs) if they have contributed to the QPR drafting, including through the CSO form.: 

Goal 1 - Support Sustainable Systems of Governance for Culture

Cultural and Creative Sectors

A Ministry (or agency with ministerial status) is responsible for cultural and creative sectors: 
YES
Regional, provincial or local governments or administrations have decentralised responsibilities for policies and measures promoting the cultural and creative sectors:: 
NO
Regulatory frameworks and sector specific laws, policies and/or strategies supporting the cultural and creative industries have been revised or adopted during the last 4 years: 
YES
If YES, has at least one of them been designed through interministerial cooperation (involving different government departments responsible for policy areas, such as communication, education, ICT, trade, foreign affairs, labor, finance): 
YES
Specific education and training programmes in the arts and the cultural and creative sectors are established, including: 
Digital literacy programmes for creation and experimentation
Technical and vocational education and training programmes in
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Visual arts
Tertiary and university education degrees in
Cinema/audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Publishing
Visual arts
Specific measures and programmes have been implemented over the last 4 years to: 
Support job creation in the cultural and creative sectors
Encourage the formalization and growth of micro/small and medium-sized cultural enterprises
Statistical offices or research bodies have produced data during the last 4 years: 
related to cultural and creative sectors
Share of cultural and creative sectors in Gross Domestic Product (GDP): 
1.50%
Total public budget for culture (in USD): 
1,869,000,000USD
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Media Diversity

Public service media has a legal or statutory remit to promote a diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Policies and measures promote content diversity in programming by supporting: 
Socio-cultural programming (e.g. children, youth, people with disabilities, etc.)
Domestic content regulations for audio-visual media exist (e.g. quotas for production or distribution requirements for national films, TV series or music on radio): 
NO
Regulatory authority(ies) monitoring media exist: 
-
If YES, please provide the name and year of establishment of the regulatory authority(ies): 
-
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) monitor: 
-
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) are responsible for: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Digital Environment

Policies, measures or mechanisms are in place to support the digital transformation of cultural and creative industries and institutions (e.g. funding for digitization of analogue industries): 
YES
Policies or measures have been introduced to ensure vibrant domestic digital cultural and creative industries markets with a diversity of e-players of all sizes (e.g. fair remuneration rules; control market concentration; prevention of monopolies of digital content providers/distributors or their algorithms that potentially restrict the diversity of cultural expressions, etc.):: 
YES
Policies and measures have been implemented to enhance access to and discoverability of domestically produced cultural content in the digital environment (e.g. action plans or policies for digital content pluralism, public support to cultural or artistic portals in specific languages, national or regional online distribution platforms for domestic content, etc.): 
YES
Measures and initiatives have been implemented to promote digital creativity and competencies of artists and other cultural professionals working with new technologies (e.g. spaces for experimentation, incubators, etc.): 
YES
Statistics or studies with recent data on access to digital media, including on the type of cultural content available through digital media, are available: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Partnering with Civil Society

Professional organizations and/or trade unions representing artists and/or cultural professionals in the following sectors exist in your country (i.e. federation of musicians, publishers unions, etc.): 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Public funding schemes supporting CSOs involvement in promoting the diversity of cultural expressions exist: 
YES
Training and mentoring opportunities were organized or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years to build skills on communication, advocacy and/or fundraising of civil society organizations involved in the promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Dialogue mechanisms between public authorities and CSOs for cultural policy making and/or monitoring have been implemented during the last 4 years (meetings, working groups, etc.): 
YES
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
In the making of Hungarian acts, the Hungarian State always consults with the civil society, involving them in political decision-making in the field of Culture, according to the Legislation Act.
The Ministry of Human Capacities concluded cooperation agreements with Hungarian cultural professional organizations (e. g. Association of Hungarian Librarians).
Policies and measures promoting the diversity of cultural expressions have been elaborated in consultation with CSOs during the last 4 years: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Goal 2 - Achieve a Balanced Flow of Cultural Goods and Services and Increase the Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Please indicate if the following policies and measures exist in your country: 
Policies and measures supporting the outward mobility of artists and cultural professionals (e.g. export offices, support for participation in international cultural markets for cultural professionals, etc.)
Please indicate if the following operational programmes have been developed or supported/funded by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Major cultural events (e.g. cultural seasons, festivals, cultural industries markets, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Please indicate if the following mobility funds (e.g. scholarships, travel grants, etc.) have been managed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Public funds supporting the outward mobility of national or resident artists and other cultural professionals
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Flow of Cultural Goods and Services

Export strategies or measures to support the distribution of cultural goods and services outside your country exist for the following cultural domains: 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Your country has granted or benefited from preferential treatment* to support a balanced exchange of cultural goods and services in the last 4 years: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Your country has provided or benefited in the last 4 years from Aid for Trade support, a form of Official Development Assistance (ODA), that helped to build capacities to formulate trade policies, participate in negotiating and implementing agreements that provide a special status to cultural goods and services: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Treaties and agreements

Multilateral or bilateral trade and/or investment agreements providing a special status to cultural goods and/or services have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negociation: 
UNDER NEGOTIATION
Multilateral or bilateral agreements including specific provisions providing a special status to cultural goods and services and digital products in the field of e-commerce have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negotiation: 
UNDER NEGOTIATION
Multilateral or bilateral agreements, declarations and/or strategies on relevant policy issues for the diversity of cultural expressions (e.g. education, digital, intellectual property, sustainable development, gender equality, etc.) signed or amended to take into account the objectives or principles of the Convention during the last 4 years: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Goal 3 - Integrate Culture in Sustainable Development Frameworks

National Sustainable Development Policies & Plans

National sustainable development plans and strategies recognize the strategic role of: 
Culture (in general)
Please rate from 1 to 4 the type of outcomes expected by the inclusion of culture in national sustainable development plans and strategies 1 most often expected outcome 4 least expected outcome): 
Cultural (e.g. cultural infrastructure, participation and access to culture, innovation, artists support): 
4
Public cultural bodies and agencies responsible for culture or creative industries are involved in the design and implementation of sustainable development policies and plans (i.e. participate in coordination mechanisms such as joint planning committees): 
YES
Cultural industry-led regeneration initiatives and projects at the regional, urban and/or rural levels have been implemented in the last 4 years: 
-
Policies and measures facilitate participation in cultural life and access to diverse cultural facilities and expressions, notably addressing the needs of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (e.g. via reduced entrance fees; audience development, arts education and audiences awareness-raising): 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

International Cooperation for Sustainable Development

Your country has contributed to or benefited from the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) during the last 4 years: 
-
Development cooperation strategies, including South-South cooperation strategies, recognize the strategic role of creativity and diverse cultural expressions: 
-
If YES, please provide the name(s) of the strategy and year(s) of adoption: 
-
Your country manages multi- and/or bilateral technical assistance and capacity building cooperation programmes supporting: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Goal 4 - Promote Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Gender Equality

Ministries, governmental agencies and/or parliamentary bodies in charge of gender equality: 
Exist but are not relevant for artists and cultural professionals
Policies and measures to support the full participation of women in cultural life have been implemented during the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures have been adopted to support the recognition and advancement of women as artists, cultural professionals and/or creative entrepreneurs, (e.g. ensure equal pay for equal work or equal access to funding, coaching or mentoring schemes, anti-discrimination measures, etc.): 
YES
Data is regularly collected and disseminated to monitor: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Artistic Freedom

The constitution and/or national regulatory frameworks formally acknowledge: 
The right of artists to create without censorship or intimidation
The right of artists to disseminate and/or perform their artistic works
The right for all citizens to freely enjoy artistic works both in public and in private
The right for all citizens to take part in cultural life without restrictions
Independent bodies are established to receive complaints and/or monitor violations and restrictions to artistic freedom: 
YES
Initiatives to protect artists at risk or in exile have been developed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years (e.g. providing safe houses, guidance and training, etc.): 
YES
Measures and initiatives intended to ensure transparent decision-making on government funding/ state grants and awards for artists exist (e.g. through independent committees, etc.): 
YES
Social protection measures that take the professional status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. health insurance, retirement schemes, unemployment benefits, etc.): 
NO
Economic measures that take the status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. collective agreements, income tax and other regulatory frameworks, etc.): 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Measures and Initiatives reported by Civil Society Organizations

Describe how the CSO form has been used to promote collaboration with CSOs in the preparation of this report, including the distribution of the form and the modalities of collection and analysis of the information received. Please indicate the percentage of measures and initiatives received that have been considered as relevant by the Party and included in the QPR.: 
-
GOAL 1 - Support sustainable systems of governance for culture: 
-
GOAL 2 - Achieve a balanced flow of cultural goods and services and increase the mobility of artists and cultural professionals: 
-
GOAL 3 - Integrate culture in sustainable development frameworks: 
-
GOAL 4 - Promote human rights and fundamental freedoms: 
-
On the basis of the analysis of the responses provided through the CSO form, present up to ten main priorities of CSOs to implement the Convention over the next four years.: 
-

Emerging Transversal Issues

Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Challenges and Achievements

Describe the main results achieved to implement the Convention (at least one major achievement in one of the four goals): 
The amendment of Act CXL of 1997 on museum institutions, public library services and public culture with the obligation to save cultural contents from the internet, concerning cultural minorities and basic cultural services to encourage cultural diversity. The Csoóri Sándor Program - launched in 2017 - which is still the primary means of promoting folk culture both in Hungary and in Hungarian communities in the surrounding countries. The Lázár Ervin Program, which provides all primary school students with the experience of attending theater, dance and circus performances, classical music concerts once a school year free of charge, regardless of social status and place of residence to encourage cultural diversity. The Déryné Program - launched in 2020 - delivers high-quality productions to small settlements lacking the possibilities to attend cultural events. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Hungary's cultural government, as an important step in the restarting process, provides one billion Hungarian Forints (appr. 2,85 million EUR) to independent performers who have been left without income. The name of the programme is "Thank you, Hungary!" It is important to emphasize that we do not distribute aid, instead, we pre-finance future artistic productions: approximately 5,000 performances by about 3,000 artists. This way, when the pandemic ends, a national programme series involving around 2,000 settlements will be launched. Within the framework of this programme, our public institutions are free to choose from a central database among artistic productions when planning their cultural calendar. The majority of theatres, concert halls, museums, as well as our libraries, archives and centres of community culture have offered free access to performances and virtual collections to spread knowledge and culture to the widest audiences, fully respecting the rights of authors. Public relations in the online space emerged thanks to social media and to the museum websites. An example is the virtual tour of the exhibition Variations on Realism - From Munkácsy to Mednyánszky in the Hungarian National Gallery. Some further outstanding examples are: the broadcasting of online performances by the Capital Circus of Budapest, performances of the Hungarian State Opera made available at their Spotify-page, access provided to more than 40 literary evenings at the Palace of Arts. The Hungarian National Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Petőfi Literary Museum or the Museum of Ethnography also offered online access to various exhibitions. The direct connection provided by the online interfaces also carried the potential for dialogue and feedback, eg. via chatrooms. Spectators could write live comments to performances which gave a new perspective to the creative process. Video content offered by artists made the connection even more personal. It is important to note that the suddenly accumulated cultural content led to an increasingly conscious selection, according to the value and quality of the digitally available material, generating competition in a good sense. Therefore, marketing and communication activities continued to be priorities at cultural institutions and companies. Also, waves of solidarity and empathy emerged for sectors in difficulty, including cultural institutions and artists. A very important initiative is that Hungarian libraries started functioning as authentic information sources in connection with the epidemic, thus contributing to the prevention of spreading fake news. Despite the forced closure of the museums, the work in the background did not stop - the management of the collections and research tasks took place continuously. In order to work efficiently, the Museum Department of the Ministry of Human Capacities established a group dealing with museum pedagogy involving colleagues from many different museums. The Department cooperated even more closely with professional organizations during the epidemic. With their help, around 4,000 staff members and nearly 200 institutions were reached. Several institutions, mainly in rural areas, were involved in providing assistance to those in need (participation in lunch delivery, cleaning, mask sewing, helping the elderly). A training was launched to support the digital switchover by the Museum of Fine Arts. The Public Collection College of the National Cultural Fund has announced a new call for tenders for the implementation of virtual exhibitions. In addition, a new tender has emerged for the implementation of living history programmes involving actors. A Female Public Leadership Program was launched under the National Talent Program at the Ministry of Human Resources in 2018. The program was designed for women between 18-36 years of age, who were offered theoretical and practical knowledge and a supporting community that was supposed to keep them in Hungary. The economic protection action plan was announced on April 7, 2020, the main goal of which is to restart the Hungarian economy as soon as possible after the COVID-19 epidemic. The creative industries need to be in an area where they can count on additional resources, receive development subsidies, tax cuts, and get favorable loans and capital programs. SMEs have been granted a temporary tax exemption that also provides immediate assistance to the creative communities. These communities are encouraged to reorganize their financial and human resources and rethink their activities in a creative way. We are in constant contact with industry players. In addition to short-term operation, the strategic development of a suitable long-term creative industry is to build the horizontal role of the creative industry, to integrate creative industry solutions into the activities of each sector, especially with regard to digitization opportunities.
Describe the main challenges encountered to implement the Convention and the main solutions found or envisaged to overcome them: 
Hungary may not interpret and manage cultural diversity in the same way as the states which are more developed, bigger, more populated. Therefore the major challenge for Hungary which prevent from the efficient implementation of the provisions of the Convention is that certain provisions of the Convention were not interpreted smoothly and the clarification of the way Hungary can promote the protection of the diversity of cultural expressions efficiently in the spirit of the Convention
Describe the steps planned in the next four years to further implement the Convention and the priority areas identified for future policy action based on the conclusions of the current reporting process: 
Hungary plans to continue ensuring the implementation of the Convention, by focusing more on eliminating the differences arising from social disadvantages.

Annexes

Please upload relevant documents (law, policy, agreement, regulation, strategy, etc.), studies and statistics in PDF format related to the implementation of the 4 goals and the 11 areas of monitoring of the Convention in your country. The documents should have been produced during the reporting period covered by this periodic report. Please provide the title and a description of the main content of the document in English or French.: 
-

Submission

Designated official signing the report: 
Title: 
Mr.
First name: 
Péter
Family name: 
Fekete
Organization: 
Ministry of Human Capacities
Position: 
Minister of State for Culture
Date of submission: 
2020
Electronic Signature: