Quadrennial Periodic Report
Iceland 2020

Quadrennial Periodic Report - - 03/02/2020 - 17:01

General Information

Technical Information

Name of Party: 
Iceland
Date of Ratification: 
2007
Officially Designated Point of Contact of the Convention: 
-
Describe the multi-stakeholder consultation process established for the preparation of this report, including consultations with relevant ministries, public institutions, local governments and civil society organizations.: 

The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture invited stakeholders to contribute to the periodical report with information about their efforts and activities related to the scope of the Convention. Stakeholders include consultations with governmental entities, civil society organizations and non governmental actors.

Executive summary: 

The UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions was accepted in Iceland in 2007. A significant portion of Iceland’s cultural policies, legislation, regulation and institutional operational frameworks harmonize with the articles of the Convention and did so prior to Iceland’s acceptance of the Convention. Policies such as the National Cultural Policy create a foundation upon which further cultural policies are built in the spirit of the Convention. While a significant portion of the framework within Iceland’s cultural sphere are already in line with the spirit of the Convention, further work within the sector is able to take the articles of the Convention into account to ensure continued progress. This is evident for example in the formulation of Iceland’s updated National Cultural Policy. Iceland acknowledges the importance of culture in all facets of society and its potential for positive impact, for example on economic, social and environmental levels.

Iceland has several cultural funds listed in this report. These provide support to the cultural industry and cultural professionals in several different ways, for example directly supporting exhibitions or events, funding a variety of projects at various different stages of their life cycles, supporting collaboration and cooperation both nationally and internationally, and promotional or marketing purposes. In most cases, these funds have regulatory framework within which to operate to ensure appropriate distribution of grants. Usually allocations are decided by a board made up of individuals appointed to represent relevant groups of stakeholders. Legislation, such as the Act on the Equal Status and Equal Rights of Women and Men (10/2008), also provide an important foundation for the operations of Iceland’s cultural funds, ensuring the equal treatment of both genders in allocations.

The Icelandic school system acknowledges the importance of creative arts and cultural heritage in the school curricula. The fundamental elements of education in Iceland emphasize that students have an understanding of society, culture, the environment and nature. The curricula takes into account national legislation on education, as well as international treaties and other covenants, such as UNESCO guidelines on sustainable development.

The USD exchange rate used in this report is 1 USD = 136.56 ISK, as per the UN Treasury’s UN Operational Rates of Exchange effective as of June 1st, 2020.

Contact details of the stakeholders involved in the preparation of the quadrennial periodic report (QPR). Please also include the contact details of the civil society organizations (CSOs) if they have contributed to the QPR drafting, including through the CSO form.: 
Organization typeOrganizationEmailWebsite
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
The Federation of Icelandic Artists
bil@bil.is
Public Sector
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
mrn@mrn.is
Public Sector
Statistics Iceland
indormation@statice.is
Public Sector
The Icelandic Centre for Research
rannis@rannis.is

Goal 1 - Support Sustainable Systems of Governance for Culture

Cultural and Creative Sectors

A Ministry (or agency with ministerial status) is responsible for cultural and creative sectors: 
YES
Regional, provincial or local governments or administrations have decentralised responsibilities for policies and measures promoting the cultural and creative sectors:: 
YES
Regulatory frameworks and sector specific laws, policies and/or strategies supporting the cultural and creative industries have been revised or adopted during the last 4 years: 
YES
If YES, has at least one of them been designed through interministerial cooperation (involving different government departments responsible for policy areas, such as communication, education, ICT, trade, foreign affairs, labor, finance): 
YES
Specific education and training programmes in the arts and the cultural and creative sectors are established, including: 
Technical and vocational education and training programmes in
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Publishing
Visual arts
Cinema/audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Publishing
Visual arts
Specific measures and programmes have been implemented over the last 4 years to: 
Support job creation in the cultural and creative sectors
Encourage the formalization and growth of micro/small and medium-sized cultural enterprises
Statistical offices or research bodies have produced data during the last 4 years: 
related to cultural and creative sectors
evaluating cultural policies
Share of cultural and creative sectors in Gross Domestic Product (GDP): 
1.50%
2019
Share of employment in the cultural and creative sectors: 
3.10%
2018
Please provide whenever possible disaggregated data by sector, age, sex and type of employment: 
As a ratio of the total quantity of those employed in the cultural and creative sectorsMaleFemaleTotal
Printing and reproduction of recorded media8.0%2.8%10.8%
Manufacture of musical instruments and jewellery and related articles0.4%0.4%0.8%
Retail sale of cultural and recreation goods in specialised stores1.1%1.6%2.8%
Publishing activities 7.0%5.4%12.4%
Motion picture, video and television programme production, sound recording and music publishing activities 5.6%5.5%11.1%
Programming and broadcasting activities 4.7%3.0%7.7%
Architectural activities 5.6%3.7%9.2%
Other professional, scientific and technical activities 2.9%3.8%6.8%
Cultural education 4.0%5.0%9.0%
Creative, arts and entertainment activities 7.7%7.9%15.6%
Libraries, archives, museums and other cultural activities 4.3%9.3%13.7%
Total51.3%48.5%100%

From Statistics Iceland (Statice)

Total public budget for culture (in USD): 
88,181,019USD
2019
Please provide whenever possible the share allocated by cultural sectors/domains (in %): 
Expenditure in the following categories as a ratio of total public cultural and creative sector expenditure 
Museum affairs29.1%
Cultural institutions36.3%
Cultural funds34.6%

From Government Accounts

Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Icelandic Film Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Icelandic Film Fund
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Media Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Film Fund has supported Icelandic film production since it was established in 1979. The Fund’s primary focus is financially supporting filmmakers in Iceland in creating films that have cultural and societal relevance in Iceland. The Fund emphasizes the development of the Icelandic film culture and supports various forms of films at several stages of film production, from script writing to production and promotion. It engages in activities such as promotion of the films within Iceland or in foreign countries, in addition to supporting local film festivals, seminars and workshops where local and foreign professionals, as well as aspiring filmmakers, are given the opportunity to form connections with one another and exchange information. The Fund has also placed particular emphasis on supporting production of children’s material, aiming to ensure that at least one project specifically aimed at children be produced each year, as per the policy of Icelandic filmmaking for the years 2016-2019. The same policy also emphasizes continuing support specifically for individuals new to the industry. Formulation of the Icelandic filmmaking policy for 2020-2030 is currently in progress. This will be the first time in Iceland that a comprehensive policy and a plan of action on its basis is formed. The policy will address the role of filmmaking in Icelandic culture, film education on all levels, promotion of Icelandic films and support in the production of films. This policy is currently being formed by a team appointed by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture who actively collaborate with stakeholders in Icelandic film making.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Icelandic Film Fund has been instrumental in supporting Icelandic film makers in completing their film related projects. This adds depth to the cultural landscape in Iceland as well as increasing awareness of Icelandic culture in foreign nations where the films may be viewed. In the year 2019, a total of 180 applications for some form of support were received by the Fund, with 92 of those projects receiving funding, a 51% success ratio. That same year, 10 Icelandic films and 6 Icelandic documentaries premiered in theatres. Numerous films supported by the Icelandic Film Fund have been selected to participate in various international film festivals. Fiscal support by the Icelandic Film Fund allows Icelandic filmmakers the opportunity to create culturally relevant and meaningful material to enhance the local culture. This equally gives foreign individuals in other countries further opportunities to be introduced to Icelandic culture and expand their own personal cultural scope.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, a total of 8,126,831 USD were allocated to the fund (1,109.8 million ISK) from the State Treasury.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Icelandic Film Centre
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Artists’ Salary Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Design
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Artists’ Salary Fund annually assigns stipends to self-employed artists in their field with the aim of enriching artistic expression and creation of artistic works. The Fund has six categories: the salary fund of designers; painters; authors; performers; musicians; and composers. The Fund provides the equivalent of 1,600 monthly salaries to artists in various professions in the aforementioned categories. Legislation regarding artists’ salaries supports the Fund by clarifying the amount of support that should be given and how allocations are determined. The legislation further clarifies the significance of receiving support from the Artists’ Salary Fund, that by receiving extended support for a period of six or more months, an individual is unable to seek full-time employment elsewhere and is required to ensure that they appropriately attend to their creation of artistic works. Since it was established in 1990, the Artists’ Salary Fund has supported artists’ abilities to create art, providing them with the financial freedom required to pursue their artistic projects and devote a significant amount of time to artistic creation. In addition to providing artists with monthly stipends the Artists’ Salary Fund also provides travel grants. This allows artists for example to personally promote their work in a larger setting, collaborate with other artists as well as seek out and provide inspiration to various communities both locally and globally. In response to the global COVID-19 crisis, the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture in Iceland has authorized additional funding for the Artists’ Salary Fund in 2020. A total of 2,200 months has been allocated to artists in various fields, a 37% increase from the 1,603 months allocated the year prior. The stimulus allows even more artists the opportunity to be fully employed in art creation and supports both cultural and economic landscapes in Iceland.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
For decades, the Artists’ Salary Fund has provided artists with the opportunity to pursue their craft. Allocations from the Fund have led to the creation of thousands of works of art, enriching the cultural landscape in Iceland. In 2019, a total of 1,603 months of artists’ salaries were assigned to 361 artists to allow them to work on their art full time, a 17% success ratio considering the total number of months applied for.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 4,773,438 USD was allocated to the fund from the State Treasury (652 million ISK).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Icelandic Centre for Research
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Federation of Icelandic Artists
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Icelandic University of the Arts
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Antiquity Fund of Iceland

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Cultural Heritage Agency of Iceland
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Antiquity Fund of Iceland allocates fiscal support to specific projects. These primarily relate to archaeological research, excavation and registration of archaeological data, communication of information regarding antiquities, preservation and maintenance in relation to archaeological objects. The Fund may also provide support to maintenance of other cultural relics. A committee of individuals from multiple facets of the industry are appointed by the Minister of Education, Science and Culture to allocate grants. The law of cultural relics specifies how the Fund operates. Its ultimate goal is to ensure that Iceland’s cultural relics and antiquities are appropriately maintained and protected, ensuring that Iceland’s cultural heritage remains intact for future generations.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Every year, several archaeological excavations and related projects have been supported by the Fund. In 2018, a total of 77 applications were received by the Fund, of which 20 were approved. The amount of fiscal support applied for was 1,559,754 USD (213 million ISK), with 334,432 USD (45.67 million ISK) allocated from the Fund that year. This is a success ratio of 21% when considering the sum applied for and the funding granted. The Fund’s impact is meaningful in ensuring that Iceland’s cultural artifacts are appropriately excavated, maintained and kept in such a fashion that they may be studied and enjoyed by the populace for generations to come.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 307,411 USD was allocated to the fund (42 million ISK) from the State Treasury.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Icelandic Centre for Research
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Association of Archaeologists
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Association of Nordic Conservators in Iceland
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Association of Icelandic Municipalities
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The Children’s Culture Fund of Iceland

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Prime Minister´s Office
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Children’s Culture Fund of Iceland was established by the Icelandic Parliament (Althing) in accordance with a resolution made at a parliamentary session conducted at Thingvellir in celebration of the centennial of Iceland’s sovereignty. The Fund is a public initiative intended to support diverse cultural activities for the benefit of children and youths. The Fund finances projects that support the democratic participation of children in society or take special measures according to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Fund works to fulfil the main goals of the government’s National Cultural Policy about cooperation between schools, civil groups and individuals, as well as the goal of equal access for children and youth to diverse and quality art events despite their living and financial situation. Eligible applicants to the Fund are artists, arts and culture organizations, NGOs, and others engaged in cultural activities for children and youth in accordance with the Cultural Policy. Children's culture refers to projects in the field of art and culture that are prepared for children and/or with the active participation of children.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Fund has financed 78 projects in the two years since it was established. Among the projects the Fund has supported are plays, workshops, podcasts, clowns, film and music festivals and other events for children or the participation of them. It funded, for example, the workshop “Girls Rock!”, a feminist project which aims to empower 10-12 year old cis girls, trans children, intersex and nonbinary children through music, as well as an art workshop project for teenagers with learning disabilities.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

732,279 USD was allocated to the Fund in 2019 from the State Treasury (100 million ISK).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Icelandic Centre for Research
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture

Icelandic Literature Center

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Icelandic Literature Center
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Publishing
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Literature Center is a public body. The role of the Center is to raise awareness of Icelandic literary culture, both in Iceland and abroad, as well as promoting its distribution through translation and travel grants. The objective is to ensure a wide range of high-quality publishing in Iceland, the international advancement of Icelandic literature, and the translation of literature from foreign languages into Icelandic. Grant allocations are made annually to domestic publishing of Icelandic literature and translation subsidies for Icelandic literature abroad. The Center cooperates with many local entities in particular campaigns to raise awareness of Icelandic literature domestically. The promotional work that the Icelandic Literature Center engages in abroad mainly involves participation in literary exhibitions. Among other things, the Center promotes various Icelandic literary works, awards received by Icelandic authors, as well as consulting with foreign publishers and translators. Authors, publishers and organizers of literary events can apply for support in the promotion of literary works written by Icelanders. The Center also supports the publication of Icelandic works of literature and the publication of literary works translated into Icelandic, as well as the advancement of literary culture in Iceland. The Center always strives to allocate support to diverse activities in the literary field on both national and international levels. The Center allocates grants each year to publishers and authors in Iceland and abroad: publication grants, grants for books for children and young readers, translation grants, innovation grants, travel grants for authors, residential grants for translators, sample translation grants and reader's report grants. The Center supports and promotes Icelandic literature internationally and assists Icelandic authors and publishers in various ways with promotional activities abroad. The Center annually publishes a brochure of books published in Iceland over the course of the previous year, deemed promising for publication abroad. The Center assists Icelandic publishers in strengthening their bonds with colleagues abroad through publisher exchanges between Iceland and other countries. In order to ensure professionalism in the allocation of grants, the Center commissions external literary advisers, appointed for one year at a time, to make proposals for allocations of grants. The board also monitor grants, as well as holding ultimate responsibility for compliance with the law. Gender equality is pursued in all the work the Center engages in, such as allocations of grants, authors' participation in events and selection of literary advisers. The Center engages in targeted measures to encourage reading, in collaboration with a broad-based group in the literary field, with the objective of increasing interest in reading and deepening the relationship between authors and readers. One aspect of this is visits by authors to upper secondary schools, which commence in 2020 in collaboration with educational authorities and other partners. The Center also conducts annual reading surveys in Iceland, in collaboration with professional organizations and bodies within the literary sector. The Center takes the initiative in active collaboration with as many professional and stakeholder organizations as possible in the fields relating to its activities, including authors, publishers, translators, universities, libraries, literary festivals, institutes, Icelandic embassies and the Reykjavík Literary Festival, Reykjavík UNESCO City of Literature, the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Icelandic embassies abroad and Promote Iceland. A Translators' Seminar is held in alternate years for translators of Icelandic literature into foreign languages, in collaboration with leading bodies in the literary field. A literary award to translators of Icelandic literature, Orðstír, is presented at the Seminar. Work is to continue on the development, promotion and use of the Translators page on the Center's website.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Icelandic Literature Center’s continuous work in promoting Icelandic literature has been of great assistance in terms of general awareness raising of Icelandic authors and literature, both nationally and internationally. The International Translators’ Seminar in Reykjavík and Orðstír award, briefly mentioned previously, is an example of a project established and conducted by the Center that supports diversity within the Icelandic literary field and promotes Icelandic literary works to a broader audience. The Center has also organized events to further promote Icelandic literature internationally, such as a promotional effort to raise awareness and increase interest in Icelandic literature in the Nordic countries, a project which was engaged in between 2014 and 2016. Iceland has also had unique opportunities in promoting its literary works on a larger scale, such as attending as Guest of Honor at the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2011. This presented a good opportunity to present Icelandic literary culture to not only Germany, but the literary sector on a larger scale, as well as an opportunity to promote Icelandic culture and arts in general. The Icelandic Literature Center equally promotes Icelandic literature nationally. The Center has engaged in some projects in this endeavor, such the launching of a reading website in association with Reykjavik UNESCO City of Literature that hosted an annual reading competition between 2014 and 2018. The competition was a national competition in reading and has provided a foundation for further similar projects, such as the Time to Read campaign launched by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture in association with the Directorate of Education in 2020.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 3,738,284 USD was allocated to the program from the State Treasury (510.5 million ISK).

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Music Recording Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Music Recording Fund
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The role of the Music Recording Fund is to empower Icelandic music by allocating grants to support the recording and publishing of music. The Fund primarily focuses on the development and recording of new, original music, with one of its key goals being the support of innovation. The Fund awards grants for a maximum of one year at a time. The Fund generally doesn’t allocate grants for operational costs of any sort and it does not support projects revolving around the reissuing of music which has already been recorded and released. The board of the Fund is composed of one individual nominated by the Minister of Education, Science and Culture and two individuals nominated by the Icelandic Music Association. The board reviews applications and makes recommendations about projects to be funded. The evaluations are performed in accordance with the Music Recording Fund guidelines which stipulate the criteria forming the basis of the board’s decision making process. In the allocation process, the guidelines emphasize equality, objectivity and transparency, as well as competitive aspects being taken into consideration.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Music Recording Fund supports innovation and diversity in music creation in Iceland. In 2019, 128 projects received fiscal support through the Fund for their projects. The total amount funded across all projects that year was 279,181 USD. The fund supports the continued innovation of musicians, leading to a more diverse music scene for both musicians and the general public to engage with.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

298,037 USD in 2019 (40.7 million ISK).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Icelandic Centre for Research
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Architectural Heritage Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Cultural Heritage Agency of Iceland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Design
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In 2012, Icelandic legislation merged two institutions into one, namely the Archaeological Heritage Agency and Architectural Heritage Board, to form the Architectural Heritage Fund. The new Fund directly reports to the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. The National Committee on Architectural Heritage operates as the board of the Fund. Committee members are appointed to serve for four years at a time. Committee members are nominated by the Architects’ Association of Iceland, a joint nomination by Iceland’s department at the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), Iceland’s department at the International Council of Museums (ICOM) and the Icelandic Museums Association, as well as a nomination from the Icelandic Association of Local Authorities. The committee formulates an overall strategy for the preservation of architectural heritage, reviews proposals regarding architectural heritage, as well as designating the framework within which the Architectural Heritage Fund operates and reviewing applications for support from the Fund. The Fund is intended as a safeguarding mechanism for architectural cultural heritage in Iceland. Through the Fund, preservation and maintenance of protected houses and structures is promoted in accordance with legislation no. 80/2012 on cultural patrimony, passed in 2012. The Fund primarily provides grants for the maintenance and improvement of protected structures, but may also provide grants for other structures that have cultural, scientific or artistic value. The Fund is an important part of the preservation of Iceland’s national cultural heritage, supporting a particular facet of the diversity of cultural expressions and protecting the ability of the general populace to enjoy the national cultural heritage in Iceland.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Since 1993, the Fund has actively allocated funds annually. A variety of different projects is fiscally supported by the Fund, such as churches, research projects and private properties. The Fund accepts applications every year, with the National Committee on Architectural Heritage reviewing applications and recommending specific projects for funding. A list of subsidies granted is available on the Architectural Heritage Fund’s website dating back to 1993. In 2020, 283 applications were received with 228 receiving funding. In 2019, 267 applications were received with 202 receiving funding. The project has kept Iceland’s architectural national heritage protected and maintained for decades, giving future generations the opportunity to enjoy the architectural national heritage Iceland has to offer.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

1,975,688 USD was allocated to the Fund from the State Treasury in 2019 (301.5 million ISK).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Cultural Heritage Agency of Iceland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Local Authorities' Equalization Fund
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The Design Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Iceland Design and Architecture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Design
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Design Fund’s aim is to strengthen the knowledge, employment opportunities and value creation in the field of design and architecture with direct financial support and consultation. The Fund also supports promotional and marketing activities abroad, which promotes increased exports of Icelandic design. The Fund is overseen by the Iceland Design and Architecture center which is under the supervision of the Ministry of Industries and Innovation. The fund is divided into four categories with different emphases: development and research grants; project grants; marketing and promotional grants; and travel grants. The categories are interlinked in such a way that a project could receive funding at multiple different stages of development and promotion. Development and research grants support innovation through funding the research and development of new designs and ideas. With a developed idea, project grants may be applied for to implement the idea. Marketing and promotional grants may be applied for once a product has been implemented, to support fully developed projects in entering the market. Travel grants are intended to increase the opportunities that designers and architects have in terms of collaboration and participation in promotional projects overseas, such as exhibitions, events, conferences, or business meetings. The board of the Fund is comprised of five individuals, one nominated by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, three by Iceland Design and Architecture and one appointed without nomination. The board reviews applications to the Fund with consideration of the quality and status of the project; the professional background of applicants; that the financial basis of the project is satisfactory; and the value and importance of the project for Icelandic design and architecture.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Since the Fund was established in 2013 it has provided various projects with numerous grants. The Fund’s website displays information regarding projects funded. In 2013, the Fund received 200 applications to the amount of 2,929,115 USD. In total, that year 29 grants were approved and 285,589 USD provided to those projects. The amount of grants approved each year has risen, with 174 applicants in 2019 and 97 projects receiving funding. Since its establishment, the Fund has supported numerous projects in various sectors of design. The Fund provides a well-structured environment for designers and architects to seek and receive fiscal support at all stages of idea creation, supporting innovation and diversity in the industry.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, the Fund allocated a total of 382,250 USD (52.2 million ISK) in all four categories of grants.

The Fund planned to allocate a total of 366,139 USD in 2020. This amount is being doubled due to a government stimulus plan as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. So far 183,070 USD have been allocated of a total 732,278 USD (100 million ISK) planned for 2020.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Ministry of Industries and Innovation
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Design Policy

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Industries and Innovation
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Design
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Design Policy’s aim is to increase the importance of design in the Icelandic economy. The goal is to strengthen the competitive position of Icelandic companies, increase value creation and quality of life. The design methodology aims to bridge the gap between creativity and innovation; technology and its users; and science and the market. The original Design Policy was formed for the years 2014-2018. Work on the Policy began in 2011, when a working group appointed by the Minister of Industries and Innovation. The Policy is based on three key pillars: Education and knowledge, with special emphasis on increasing availability of design related studies on primary and secondary levels, as well as strengthening studies related to research in the design field in upper educational levels. Working environments and support networks of designers, with the aim of strengthening collaboration, increasing efficiency, simplifying processes and improving regulation. Awareness raising, increasing the understanding of the importance and value of good design and architecture, in addition to promoting presentations and exhibitions in Iceland and abroad. An updated Policy has been established for 2019-2027. The current Design Policy focuses on a better community and maximization of value created. The Policy is a broad cooperative project between the government, the business community and the design community. A steering committee for the Design Policy is in place, appointed by the Ministry of Industry and Innovation in collaboration with the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Design Policy is incredibly important as a guide to how the government views its interaction with the design community. The Policy provides part of the foundation that measures such as the Design Fund base allocations off. While it is fairly recent, the Policy is an important part of a continuing effort in supporting a growing design community in Iceland and recognizing its value to society both culturally and economically.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Iceland Design and Architecture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

National Cultural Policy

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The current National Cultural Policy describes the government's involvement in matters relating to the arts and cultural heritage and pertains to the years 2013-2020. It is intended as an aid for government and lawmakers, to provide a framework for guidance in future debates, policy making and decision making in the sectors to which the policy pertains. In broad strokes, the National Cultural Policy focuses on increasing the public's access to participating in or consuming cultural activities and cultural heritage; supporting cooperation between the government and entities actively participating in the field of culture; as well as placing a special emphasis on the participation of children and youth in cultural activities. With the policy, the Icelandic government acknowledges its role in creating appropriate conditions for fostering diversity, innovation and initiative in the field of arts and cultural heritage. The importance of diversity, supporting individuals, institutions and organizations engaged in cultural activities and enabling youth in the cultural sphere are recognized as pivotal points in the Policy. The freedom of expression and democracy are equally recognized as fundamental in creative activity. Iceland's participation in the international context is also addressed with the aim to increase international cooperation, in particular with sister organizations in other Nordic countries. Formulation of a new National Cultural Policy is currently in progress. The new Policy is formed with consideration of various data, such as the previous Cultural Policy, existing cultural legislation, and the UN's sustainable development goals. This is intended as an all-encompassing comprehensive guideline for all matters cultural within the country. The Policy will act as a guide for government support of cultural activities until 2030.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The National Cultural Policy has provided a guideline for cultural activities in Iceland. The policy has supported the government in a cohesive approach to cultural matters and provided an important basis against which to evaluate cultural policies and activities. The National Cultural Policy will continuously be updated to best reflect the areas of greatest importance at any given time and continue to provide a framework within which cultural policies and activities may be measured and evaluated.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Museum Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Museum Council of Iceland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Museum Council of Iceland is an advisory board for the Icelandic Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. The Council deals with various tasks regarding museums, whether cultural, artistic or natural history. The Museum Council assesses applications from museums that seek accreditation and prepares a proposal for the Minister of Education, Science and Culture that issues the accreditation. In 2020, 46 accredited museums exist in Iceland. Among the Museum Council’s duties is overall supervision of museum activities in Iceland, drafting policies in collaboration with the central museums and designating standards in relation to matters such as accessibility and safety. The Council also establishes the rules for allocation from the Museum Fund and evaluates applications to the Fund. Allocations from the Fund are granted to accredited museums for particular projects. Accredited museums which are not publicly owned are able to apply for operating grants and non-accredited museums are able to apply for support in particular projects that they engage in in collaboration with accredited museums. International projects are also supported by the Fund. Three principal, or central, museums in Iceland form strategies for other museums in their respective fields: The National Gallery; The Museum of Natural History; and the National Museum of Iceland. These museums are state funded.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
All accredited museums work in accordance with the Museum Act and the ICOM Code of Ethics. These museums have the duty to acquire; to preserve and promote; communicate their collections; and safeguard the natural, cultural and scientific heritage that they protect. The museums promote the well-being of people, social development, tolerance and respect, by advocating for multicultural and multilingual expressions in the promotion of collections of both tangible and intangible cultural heritage. The museums create a favourable environment for connections between the community and museums to create a harmonious relationship between the two parts. Since the Museum Fund’s establishment in 2001 it has allocated over 13,473,931 USD (1,840,000,000 ISK) to roughly 1,800 different projects.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, the Museum Fund made allocations in the amount of 922,671 USD (126 million ISK).

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Icelandic Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The Museum Council of Iceland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Publishing
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies is an independently funded academic research institute at the University of Iceland under direct supervision of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. Its role is to conduct research in the field of Icelandic studies and related scholarly disciplines, in particular Icelandic language and literature; to disseminate knowledge in these fields; and to preserve and augment the collections entrusted to its care. The Institute serves the role of teaching Icelandic and providing services to university professors of Icelandic at foreign universities on behalf of the Icelandic government. The Institute is a member of the Nordic Cooperation Committee for teaching Nordic studies abroad. It also offers a popular international summer course in Icelandic. One of the Institute’s main goals is safeguarding Icelandic manuscripts. The Institute also works on practical and theoretical research on the Icelandic language, literature, history and culture. It employs a number of full-time scholars as well as guests who are provided with facilities for researching, either in the short or long term. Several doctoral students have research facilities at the Institute and work on their projects in close cooperation with the Institute’s staff and guests. The Institute provides grants to foreign writers, translators and scholars through the Snorri Sturluson Icelandic Fellowships. These are awarded to individuals who seek to reside in Iceland for a few months specifically to acquaint themselves with the Icelandic language, culture and the local way of life.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Institute has provided a valuable service in terms of supporting scholars and those studying the Icelandic language. The Institute’s website hosts a publicly accessible list of endorsed projects. Some of the research projects endorsed have led to the development of continuously usable products, such as the Icelandic Vocabulary Network, a collection of over 200,000 various Icelandic phrases.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, the Institution received 3,595,489 USD (491 million ISK) allocated from the State Treasury.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Iceland Symphony Orchestra

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Iceland Symphony Orchestra
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Iceland Symphony Orchestra is the national orchestra of Iceland, founded in 1950. The Orchestra is a leading institution in the country’s cultural sphere. The Orchestra conducts weekly concerts in the Harpa Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre and has performed at numerous international festivals and in concert halls abroad. The Orchestra provides various types of concerts within the orchestral field, with school and family concerts, as well as concerts devoted to modern music. A majority of the Orchestra’s concerts are broadcast live on radio by the National Broadcasting Service, with some selected concerts televised and broadcast live on the web. In 1982, the Law on the Symphonic Orchestra of Iceland no. 36/1982 was passed in Parliament. This gives the Symphony Orchestra a secure place in Icelandic culture, acknowledging its role as an important part of the foundation of the Icelandic cultural landscape.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In the orchestral season of 2018-2019, the Orchestra performed 86 concerts and held 42 other events related to their music. An estimated 106,000 people attended the concerts of the season. The Orchestra also commonly travels to concerts and events abroad. In 2018, the Orchestra embarked on a highly successful three-week tour in Japan, as well as a tour of both Germany and Austria in that same year. The Orchestra has received international critical acclaim, participating in numerous musical works of various types. The Orchestra also works with various artists and conductors. In the 2018-2019 season, the Orchestra collaborated with around 130 different performers, such as choirs, musicians, actors, comedian and world renowned conductors.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

The Iceland Symphony Orchestra is funded both by the Icelandic government as well as the City of Reykjavik. In 2019, 8,670,182 USD (1,184 million ISK) was allocated to the Iceland Symphony Orchestra from the State Treasury. The City of Reykjavik also allocated 1,882,000 USD (257 million ISK) to the Orchestra in 2019.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Reykjavík City
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The National Theatre of Iceland

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The National Theatre of Iceland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The National Theatre of Iceland has been a leading institution in the Icelandic theatre scene since its formal opening in 1950. Presently, the Theatre has five separate venues with incredibly diversity in its production. With a varied selection of theatre productions, the National Theatre endeavors to stimulate interest in theatre and the dramatic arts with people of all ages while encouraging Icelandic playwrights in their writing and providing support for the development of other dramatic creations. The Theatre stages around 20-30 productions each season. These are, for example, Icelandic and foreign classics, musicals, dance pieces, puppet theatres and various children’s productions. The Theatre collaborates with independent theatre and dance groups on new productions. It often takes its productions on national tours and occasionally tours its productions internationally. The Theatre employs about 130 individuals in freelance roles. An Equal Rights Strategy is in place for the National Theatre. The aim of the strategy is to ensure the equal rights and treatment of individuals of both genders within the Theatre and that both genders receive equal remuneration. The National Theatre of Iceland is the property of the Icelandic Nation. It is funded by the Icelandic government with the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture overseeing the Theatre.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In 2018, the National Theatre received 118,000 visitors to their live performances. In that year, 36 different shows of various types were held, nine of which were shows specifically for children or youth. Children and youth shows alone were attended by 44,000 individuals.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, the National Theatre received 10,537,493 USD (1,439 million ISK) from the State Treasury.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Media Diversity

Public service media has a legal or statutory remit to promote a diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Policies and measures promote content diversity in programming by supporting: 
Regional and/or local broadcasters
Linguistic diversity in media programming
Socio-cultural programming (e.g. children, youth, people with disabilities, etc.)
Domestic content regulations for audio-visual media exist (e.g. quotas for production or distribution requirements for national films, TV series or music on radio): 
NO
Regulatory authority(ies) monitoring media exist: 
YES
If YES, please provide the name and year of establishment of the regulatory authority(ies): 
Media Committee (2011)
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) monitor: 
Public media
Community media
Private sector media
Online media
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) are responsible for: 
Issuing licenses to broadcasters, content providers, platforms
Receiving and addressing public complaints such as online harassment, fake news, hate speech, etc.
Monitoring gender equality in the media
Monitoring editorial independence of the media
Monitoring diversity in media ownership (diversity of ownership structures, transparency of ownership rules, limits on ownership concentration, etc.)
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Media Committee

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Media Committee
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Media Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Media Committee is an independent administrative committee which reports directly to the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. The Committee conducts surveillance in accordance with the media law and other relevant legislation. Its role is to promote media literacy, diversity and pluralism in the media, as well as safeguarding the freedom of expression and the right of the public to information. The Committee regulates both public and commercial media services in Iceland in accordance with the media act (38/2011) and the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service act (23/2013). The Committee additionally monitors children’s access to films and video games in accordance with the act on the monitoring of children’s access to films and video games (62/2006). The Committee monitors and conducts surveillance of a variety of both public and private media in Iceland. It monitors the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service (RÚV) and annually reviews its performance to determine if its operations are in line with legislation and guidelines. The Committee also monitors private media and how both audio and visual material is delivered.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Since the Committee was formed in 2011 it has been an instrumental part of monitoring and reviewing media related issues, for example reviewing and providing commentary on seven bills undergoing the Parliamentary process throughout this timeframe. The Committee’s main task is monitoring and conducting surveillance of the media, ensuring that both public and private bodies work in accordance with the media act (38/2011). The Committee takes suggestions from the general public and is able to determine whether a media organization is in breach of relevant legislation following a review. Since it was formed in 2011, the Committee has issued 53 verdicts on issues that have been pointed out by public comments. Specific verdicts can be accessed on the Committee’s webpage: https://fjolmidlanefnd.is/urlausnir/
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

366,139 USD were allocated to The Media Committee for the year 2019 (50 million ISK).

The Icelandic National Broadcasting Service

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic National Broadcasting Service
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The National Broadcasting Service (RÚV) is a public body, whose main objective is to inform, educate and entertain. These roles are reflected in its mission to provide the public with reliable news service and culture and entertainment content of the highest quality. The National Broadcasting Service also emphasizes the Icelandic language, the history of the nation, cultural heritage and engaging in an active dialogue with the public. One of the National Broadcasting Service’s main features is to produce and broadcast high quality content in the Icelandic language, thereby providing the public with access to the nation’s history and cultural heritage. The National Broadcasting Service provides the nation with national and international news several times a day every day, in radio, on television and on their web page. With a history spanning over 80 years, the services provided today span across two television channels, three radio channels as well as a web page and mobile accessibility. The National Broadcasting Service unveiled a new strategy in 2017, intended to serve for the five following years. Some of the key points of this strategy were upgrading their services to respond to a dynamic and rapidly changing technological environment, ensuring that the Service meets the needs of modern individuals.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The National Broadcasting Service’s primary goal is ensuring that its various media is accessible to individuals wherever they are located. The Service has a goal of reaching 99.8% of the population. With the Service broadcasting every day, it serves a vital role in reaching individuals around the entire country. Over 76% of the Icelandic population uses its services daily, with 95% of the population using the media services provided weekly. The National Broadcasting service is incredibly important role in the dissemination of information regarding general national and international events and news, in addition to producing and broadcasting cultural content, content for children and youth, developing accessible and modern solutions for a continuously evolving society and more.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

30,096,660.81 USD was allocated to the National Broadcasting Service in 2019 (4,110 million ISK).

Digital Environment

Policies, measures or mechanisms are in place to support the digital transformation of cultural and creative industries and institutions (e.g. funding for digitization of analogue industries): 
YES
Policies or measures have been introduced to ensure vibrant domestic digital cultural and creative industries markets with a diversity of e-players of all sizes (e.g. fair remuneration rules; control market concentration; prevention of monopolies of digital content providers/distributors or their algorithms that potentially restrict the diversity of cultural expressions, etc.):: 
YES
Policies and measures have been implemented to enhance access to and discoverability of domestically produced cultural content in the digital environment (e.g. action plans or policies for digital content pluralism, public support to cultural or artistic portals in specific languages, national or regional online distribution platforms for domestic content, etc.): 
YES
Measures and initiatives have been implemented to promote digital creativity and competencies of artists and other cultural professionals working with new technologies (e.g. spaces for experimentation, incubators, etc.): 
NO
Statistics or studies with recent data on access to digital media, including on the type of cultural content available through digital media, are available: 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Media for the Future

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic National Broadcasting Service
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The National Broadcasting Service (RÚV) is a public body, whose main objective is to inform, educate and entertain. In 2017, the National Broadcasting Service introduced a new operating policy for the next four years, entitled “Media for the Future”. The policy is the result of extensive research. Existing policies and operating procedures of public media institutions were analyzed, as well as relationships between the institutions and their stakeholders. The policy is intended to be the National Broadcasting Service’s guideline as well as a recipe for how it intends on maintaining a good relationship with the general public in the future. One of the key points of focus in this policy is an increased emphasis on providing users with digital and non-linear services, thereby meeting the ever-increasing demands of a modern society in terms of access to public service media programs. A new division, Current Media (Númiðlar) was formed within the National Broadcasting Service. This division is equally responsible for perpetual programming on the web, radio and social media. The National Broadcasting Service has also made considerable investments into technology and software development to be able to achieve these goals. Part of the National Broadcasting Service’s new policy included the introduction of a new media player for both radio and browser-based television applications, in addition to improving the National Broadcasting Service’s app, available for smart devices, as well as specific integrations with services such as Apple TV and Spotify. The new policy specifies some main target groups, one of which is individuals between the ages of 15-29. The National Broadcasting Service is producing programs designed to fit this age group, with a project manager hired specifically for this role. In 2015, the National Broadcasting Service launched a new service aimed at children (KrakkaRÚV). The new policy emphasizes a strong focus on this service by establishing a new division that will solely focus on content created for children. The National Broadcasting Service has already developed a special app for the children’s service, usable on all smart devices and Apple TV.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The National Broadcasting Service’s new policy places the emphasis on digital development and services as the core activity of all program divisions. The policy has significantly increased the accessibility and ease of access to the services provided. Over 76% of the Icelandic population uses its services daily, with 95% of the population using the media services provided weekly.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Icelandic National Broadcasting Service
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Partnering with Civil Society

Professional organizations and/or trade unions representing artists and/or cultural professionals in the following sectors exist in your country (i.e. federation of musicians, publishers unions, etc.): 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Public funding schemes supporting CSOs involvement in promoting the diversity of cultural expressions exist: 
YES
Training and mentoring opportunities were organized or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years to build skills on communication, advocacy and/or fundraising of civil society organizations involved in the promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions: 
NO
Dialogue mechanisms between public authorities and CSOs for cultural policy making and/or monitoring have been implemented during the last 4 years (meetings, working groups, etc.): 
YES
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
A new National Cultural Policy is currently being formulated in Iceland, intended as an overarching guideline for cultural matters in the country. With a policy of such breadth, numerous stakeholders have been mobilized to represent various points of view. As part of the process in the creation of a new National Cultural Policy, the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture gathered a group of individuals from the Federation of Icelandic artists (CSO) and other stakeholders for a symposium conducted over the course of two main sessions in late 2018. Stakeholders were presented with key points that the new Policy aims to address and had the opportunity to respond with their own points and concerns that are logged and taken into consideration for further formulation of the Policy.
Policies and measures promoting the diversity of cultural expressions have been elaborated in consultation with CSOs during the last 4 years: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Grants for the Activities of Amateur Theater Groups

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Ministry of Education and Culture
The Federation of Icelandic Theater Groups
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Performing Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture provides fiscal support to various theater groups registered into the Federation of Icelandic Theater Groups. The Federation is a coalition of around 4,000 individuals in Iceland involved in some way in theater productions. The Grants support various types of theater productions of both local and foreign pieces. The Grants are also awarded for individuals holding seminars or for students attending theater studies. The Federation’s cultural policy emphasizes developing and supporting theater work in all parts of the country and giving amateurs the opportunity to acquire an education in the field, creating a venue for professional growth. Focus is also placed on supporting children and youth in getting to know the theater, as well as establishing good communication and collaboration with amateur theater groups in other Nordic countries and on an international platform. The Federation ensures that the Icelandic amateur theater industry on the whole is supported and able to keep growing in an increasingly diverse society.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Funding is granted in support of a wide array of amateur theater artists. This allows for a wider range of theater productions to be brought to the stage. This allows for more diversity in cultural expression both individually and on the whole, with theater artists having more freedom to pursue a wide range of productions.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

135,471.59 USD (18.5 million ISK) was allocated to the fund from the State Treasury in 2019.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Federation of Icelandic Theater Groups
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Youth Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The aim of the Youth Fund is to support youth club projects. It focuses on financing projects either made for, or actively participating with, children and youth. Financing may be used for such activities as training group leaders, supervisors and volunteers; innovation and development of projects; as well as collaborative projects between youth clubs and organizations. The target group is children and youth 6-25 years old, in addition to individuals working with and/or for the age group. All projects must be categorized as occurring within organized clubs, where children and youth work in their spare time on ideas and interests that they themselves inspire.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The specific objectives pursued by the Youth Fund are: increasing the number of young people active in youth clubs; tackling threats to the integrity of youth clubs, such as xenophobia and violence, as well as all kinds of intolerance and discrimination; promoting and supporting good governance in youth clubs, organizations and voluntary activities in youth organizations, focusing on inclusion and equal opportunities. In 2019, the Youth Fund financed rap workshops for teenagers, leadership workshops for children, and a program revolving around cultural literacy for everyone. The fund gives an increased opportunity for various diverse projects and programs to be executed, broadening the cultural horizons of children and youth.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 67,699.18 USD was allocated to the fund from the State Treasury (9.245 million ISK).

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Icelandic Center for Research (RANNÍS)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The Board of the Icelandic Youth Fund
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 2 - Achieve a Balanced Flow of Cultural Goods and Services and Increase the Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Please indicate if the following policies and measures exist in your country: 
Policies and measures supporting the outward mobility of artists and cultural professionals (e.g. export offices, support for participation in international cultural markets for cultural professionals, etc.)
Specific visa policies or other cross border measures supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and cultural professionals in your country (e.g. simplified visa procedures, reduced fees for visas, visas for longer durations)
Work permit regulations supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and cultural professionals in your country (e.g. double taxation avoidance agreements, special work permits and health insurance, subsidies to cover living expenses, etc.)
Please indicate if the following operational programmes have been developed or supported/funded by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Major cultural events (e.g. cultural seasons, festivals, cultural industries markets, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Please indicate if the following mobility funds (e.g. scholarships, travel grants, etc.) have been managed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Public funds supporting the outward mobility of national or resident artists and other cultural professionals
Public funds supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and other cultural professionals, notably from developing countries
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Greenland Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Greenland Fund is established to promote communication between Icelandic and Greenlandic individuals. The Fund supports various projects, such as introductory tours of the relevant countries, support for students, art shows, sports events and other activities related to culture, education and science that could support the increased communication and flow of information between Iceland and Greenland. The Fund operates with three individuals appointed to the board of the Fund who prepare recommendations for projects to support. The Icelandic Minister of Education, Science and Culture makes the ultimate decision as far as allocations from the fund.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Through allocations, the Greenland Fund is able to continue supporting the prosperous relationship that Iceland and Greenland foster. In 2019, 37 applications were received to the Fund, of which six received fiscal support. The Fund has led to increased communications between Icelandic and Greenlandic individuals, supporting the flow of information and communication, as well as creating a platform for shared cultural expressions.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 7,322.79 USD was allocated to the fund from the Icelandic State Treasury (1 million ISK).

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Icelandic Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Greenlandic Ministry of Education, Culture and Church
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The Icelandic-Finnish Culture Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Hanaholmen - The Icelandic-Finnish Cultural Foundation
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic-Finnish Culture Fund aims to promote relations and cultural exchanges between Finland and Iceland and to increase the countries’ mutual awareness and knowledge. The Fund provides fiscal support to projects in various different societal and cultural fields. These may be related to promotions of cultural exchanges between the two countries, increasing interest in the other country’s cultural expressions and dealing with challenges and opportunities related to the industry, social development and cultural life of the two countries. The Fund unites the two countries in mutual support of each other’s cultures, providing a richer cultural landscape on the whole, bringing the two closer together to allow for expanded cultural expressions between the countries.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Fund annually supports several projects relating to various types of cultural activities. For the allocation period of the second half of the year 2020 to the former half of the year 2021, a total of 69 applications were received, with 35 of those being approved for funding, a 51% success ratio considering the number of applications. The Fund continues to support collaboration, the flow of artists and mutual cultural expressions between the two countries. This provides a mutually supportive environment for both to share culturally, socially and economically.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

For the allocation period of the second half of the year 2020 to the former half of the year 2021, a total of 28,422 USD (25,750 EUR) was allocated from the fund to support various projects.

The Snorri Sturluson Icelandic Fellowships

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Snorri Sturluson Icelandic Fellowships were originally established in 1991 on the 750th anniversary of the birth of Snorri Sturluson. The Fellowships are managed by the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies. Allocations from the Fellowships are granted to foreign authors, translators and scholars in the field of social sciences, with the purpose of staying in Iceland for at least a three month period, to get acquainted with the Icelandic language, culture and daily life. The Árni Magnússon Institute assists grantees during their stay in Iceland as required. Grants generally cover travel expenses for the trip to and from Iceland and residence expenses. The Fellowships favor applicants from Eastern and Southern Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and Oceania. A committee, made up of individuals appointed from the Árni Magnússon Institute, the University of Iceland Institution for Literature and Writer’s Association of Iceland for a three year period at a time, allocates grants from the Fellowships.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Since the Fellowships first started making allocations in 1993, every year an average of 3 individuals have received grants. The Fellowships specifically target those who intend on studying or working in Iceland, performing work that in some way involves the Icelandic language or culture. Numerous grantees have translated Icelandic literary works, some have authored their own literary works based in Iceland or on Icelandic history, as well as various further expressions of the literary artform. The Fellowships support the flow of culture between countries, reaching a mutually beneficial outcome through shared cultural expressions. Specific allocations and their projects can be accessed on the Árni Magnússon Institute website.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

The Arni Magnusson Institute receives 4,394 USD (600,000 ISK) annually from the State to be allocated through the Snorri Sturluson Fellowships, though allocations granted per year often exceed this amount.

In 2019, 1,245 USD (170,000 ISK) was considered the monthly stipend for each individual receiving support from the Fellowships.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Iceland Design and Architecture

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Industries and Innovation
Ministry of Culture, Science and Education
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Design
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Iceland Design and Architecture is a center for promotion and information regarding design and architecture in Iceland. The center aims to showcase the importance of design for the Icelandic economy and society as a whole, emphasizing that Icelandic design is capable of incredible value creation. The center supports Icelandic designers in promoting themselves and their creations abroad. Iceland Design and Architecture manages various design related projects, such as the Design Fund, which can support design projects at all stages of development and promotion. Another project the center organizes is Design March, an annual festival held in March with around 400 participants. A part of Design March are DesignTalks, where several internationally acclaimed designers have lent their expertise to inform and educate attendees. Iceland Design and Architecture also hosts the Iceland Design Award, publishes a magazine on Icelandic design and architecture and oversees the national Design Policy.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The center has provided numerous designers and architects in Iceland with opportunities, especially in relation to promotional activities that the center engages in. Events such as DesignTalks offer designers the chance to widen their horizons through introductions to different designers and their ideologies. Through distributions of the Design Fund and the center’s other projects, opportunities for designers and architects within Iceland are more accessible and the industry better supported.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

219,684 USD (30 million ISK) is allocated annually to the center from the Ministry of Industries and Innovation and the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture.

The Icelandic Film Centre

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Film Centre
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Media Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Film Centre operates in accordance with the Film Act no. 137/2001. The Film Centre’s main goal is to oversee the Icelandic Film Museum, the Icelandic Film Council and Icelandic Film Fund. The Minister of Education, Science and Culture appoints a committee of seven individuals that serves as the Icelandic Film Council for a three-year term. The Council provides the government with advice and ideas on policies and goals to be emphasized within the film sector. The Icelandic film and television production sector has seen incredibly rapid recent growth. With a number of large productions occurring within the country, Iceland has become a hotspot for international filmmaking. As such, the Film Centre’s role has grown in importance over the course of the last years. The Film Centre provides incentive to foreign production firms to produce films in Iceland via a reimbursement of up to 25% of production costs that occur within the country. If 80% or more of the total production cost of a motion picture or television program is incurred in Iceland, the reimbursement is calculated on the basis of the total production cost incurred within the European Economic Area. Projects must fulfill certain cultural and production criteria in order to receive a letter of intent for reimbursement. The Film Centre also plays a pivotal role in Icelandic filmmaking through management of the Film Fund, which provides financial support for films at various stages of production. These may be for example grants for screenwriting, project development, production, post-production and promotional purposes.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Icelandic Film Centre has played a crucial role in supporting the rapid development of the Icelandic film industry in recent years. The fiscal support provided by the funds and measures that the Icelandic Film Centre manages has given Icelandic filmmakers the opportunity to create culturally relevant and meaningful content to enhance the local culture. In 2019, the Film Fund received a total of 180 applications for some form of support with 92 of those projects receiving funding, a 51% success ratio. In 1999, the Act on Temporary Reimbursements for Film Production in Iceland no. 43/1999 was passed in Parliament. This authorized the State Treasury to reimburse filmmakers for partial production costs incurred within the country. Since the Act was passed it has attracted numerous sizeable international projects that provide individuals with employment, fuel the economy and expand the cultural landscape.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, a total of 8,126,831 USD (1,110 million ISK) was allocated to the Fund from the State Treasury.

In 2019 the State Treasury reimbursed a total of 8,173,748 USD (1,116 million ISK) as part of the filmmaking reimbursement incentive.

Art for All

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Culture, Science and Education
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Art for All is a cultural project for children and youth. The project aims to select and produce art events nationwide, ensuring that children and youth have access to diverse and sophisticated cultural programs regardless of their residential and economic circumstances. The main focus of the project is on culture, both for and with children. Its goal is to ensure that all children throughout primary and secondary educational levels in Iceland have the opportunity to enjoy regular visits by artists. Over the course of a ten-year period of school attendance, children and youth will be introduced to diverse artistic expressions in Iceland, cultural heritage and art from different cultural spheres. Through the project, the cultural supply in Iceland is increased and extended. The project strengthens the cooperation of artists and art groups with the children and youth of the nation, while maintaining high standards of quality and professionalism. The Art for All website provides a useful venue for accessing information regarding cultural content for children. All art events on offer for Icelandic schools are listed on the website (Listviðburðir); information on cultural institutions and museums in Iceland that offer art and culture for children and youth (Listveitan); and an online source of diverse and professional art material for schools (Menningarhús og söfn).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The project provides children and youth with equal opportunity to experience diverse cultural expressions through their education. This leads to an increase in cultural expressions in the nation, by providing artists with a platform to express their art as well as youth an opportunity to experience this art. The project also provides an opportunity for cooperation between artists and schools and offers more venues for cultural expressions.

Center for Performing Arts

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Performing Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Act on Performing Arts no. 165/2019 establishes a framework concerning performing arts in the country with the aim of creating favorable conditions for performing arts in the country. The legislation took effect on July 1st, 2020. The 18th article of the Act on Performing Arts specifies the creation of the Center for Performing Arts. The creation of the Center is the responsibility of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. The Center will serve the role of promoting Icelandic performing arts both nationally and internationally, as well as strengthening international cooperation with Icelandic performing artists and organizations in the industry. As the legislation has recently taken effect, the Center has yet to be established. Once founded, it will serve an important role in the performing arts sector within Iceland.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO

Regional Offensive Strategies

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Icelandic Regional Development Institute
Icelandic Government
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Regional Offensive Strategies is a collaborative development project between ministries and municipalities in Iceland. The purpose of the project is to shift power and responsibility to individual regions in terms of project prioritization and administration of state funds that are not legally bound to be allocated by other institutions or organizations. The aim is to improve the utilization of public funds and shift decision making closer to locals. The aim of the Regional Offensive Strategies is to ensure that capital allocated to projects in particular regions in the employment, development and cultural sectors are based on regional emphases and goals. The goal is to support positive community development, strengthen cultural foundations and increase individual regions’ abilities to be competitive, as well as strengthening the nation’s competitiveness overall. Equally it aims to simplify the communication of the Icelandic State and its municipalities as well as ensuring transparency in financial allocations and the general administration of public funds. Structural Funds are part of the Offensive Strategies. These are intended to provide regional support for projects involving culture or innovation. The office of the Regional Offensive Strategy manages the Funds, with a special committee in every region choosing the assignments that receive funding based on a professional evaluation. Priority projects are contractual and temporary and have a direct implication to the relevant region’s strategy. They can, among other things, be consultancy or campaign projects in the fields of innovation, culture and marketing.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The project increases effectiveness in the distribution of public funds in all regions of the country. Through the fund, numerous opportunities are created for cultural professionals and innovators. Projects can prove incredibly beneficial to regions, both by the individual support provided, as well as overarching economic and cultural gains, both locally and nationally.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

8,648,213 USD was allocated cumulatively from the State Treasury to the Regional Development Plan and Regional Offensive Strategies in 2019 (1,181 million ISK).

The Swedish-Icelandic Collaboration Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Swedish-Icelandic Collaboration Fund was established in 1995 following a gift from the Swedish government on the 50th anniversary of the republic of Iceland in 1994. This present to the nation was a monetary sum to be used to support the two nations’ cultural exchanges and laid the foundation for the Fund. The Fund’s aim is to promote Swedish-Icelandic cooperation and mutual cultural exchanges. Grants are allocated from the Fund for various cooperative projects, such as in the fields of science; social work; educational matters; and cultural matters. Funding is provided to individual projects of different types, though for the last few years the Fund has only allocated travel grants. Allocations are decided by the board of the Fund, which is made up of three individuals from each country. The size of an individual allocation ranges between approximately 210 USD and 730 USD (2000 SEK to 7000 SEK).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Swedish-Icelandic Collaboration Fund has provided a solid foundation for collaboration and shared cultural expressions between the two nations. Through the Fund, collaborative projects between the two nations have become more accessible and the free flow of artists and ideas between the two countries is further supported. Ultimately it supports artists in their ability to work and enable communications within a larger cultural setting, leading to a richer overall cultural environment for both nations, leading to potential enrichment in other facets of society.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

14,645.6 USD (2 million ISK) from the State Treasury annually.

Iceland Music (ÚTÓN)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Iceland Music (ÚTÓN)
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Iceland Music (ÚTÓN) was founded in 2006 as an export office for Icelandic music. It was created by various musical right holder’s societies in partnership with governmental and private funds. Iceland Music organizes marketing strategies for musicians and music businesses within the industry, providing an essential one-stop resource for all interested parties. This is achieved via a multi-strategy approach that includes building accessible, comprehensive databases, promoting Icelandic labels, bands and events, as well as providing information on Icelandic music to markets and the media. As such, it encourages and helps Icelandic bands, PRs and record labels participate in events and festivals around the world. Iceland Music manages two webpages. The first of these is the Iceland Music website (https://www.uton.is/), that is targeted at an international, English speaking audience and introduces Icelandic music, artists, labels and festivals to a global audience. Social media plays an integral role in outreach to the English audience, with Iceland Music maintaining active presences on social media platforms. Through channels such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Spotify, audiences can stay updated with the latest happenings in Icelandic music of all genres. Iceland Music also issues a quarterly newsletter where it provides direct-to-inbox information about what is happening in different music genres. Iceland Music also manages the ÚTÓN webpage (https://www.uton.is/) which is the Icelandic language resource for Icelandic musicians and the Icelandic music industry. Local musicians may use the page for educational resources, information about performing at showcase festivals, as well as information on travel and marketing grants. Iceland Music supports Icelandic musicians through the Music Export Fund and Marketing Grant. The Music Expert Fund is distributed in the form of direct payment, currently around 366 USD (50,000 ISK) per band member. The Marketing Grant is aimed at musicians aiming to engage in larger scale promotional efforts. Grants are awarded four times a year, with up to 14,646 USD (2 million ISK) available for each disbursement. The Funds are financed and supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, the Composers Rights Society of Iceland (STEF), the Association of Icelandic Musicians (FÍH) and the Icelandic Association of Record Producers (FHF). Iceland Music also provides personal consulting services for musicians and musical projects that aim for international success. Iceland Music provides advice for, among other things; concerts abroad and selection of market areas; sponsorship matters; showcase festivals; and networking both nationally and internationally.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In increasing access to information about Icelandic artists and collaborating with partners to promote Icelandic music abroad, Iceland Music increases the visibility of Icelandic music in the international sphere. For example, Icelandic artists performed over 1250 international gigs in 2017 with that number steadily growing between years. The Iceland Music webpage lists the number of musical events held by Icelandic artists abroad annually.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Iceland Music received an allocation of 146,456 USD (20 million ISK) for the year 2019 from the State Treasury.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Composers Rights Society of Iceland (STEF)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Association of Icelandic Musicians (FÍH)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Icelandic Association of Record Producers (FHF)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Iceland Music Information Centre

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Iceland Music Information Centre
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Iceland Music Information Centre was founded in 1968 and is at the center of classical and contemporary music in Iceland. Its role is to document and promote Icelandic musical composition, ensure their accessibility for performances, and to support the work of Icelandic composers both domestically and internationally. The Iceland Music Information Centre has an online music collection, which stores the largest collection of Icelandic musical compositions in the world. This online archive is composed of over ten thousand Icelandic compositions made by over four hundred composers. Composers are given the option of registering their own work in the online database. The presentation and promotion of Icelandic composers and compositions in the Centre is an important part of its work. The primary goal of the promotional work that the Centre engages in is to introduce Icelandic compositions to performers, orchestral conductors, project committees and others who work in the field of music, as well as to introduce Icelandic compositions to new audiences. The Iceland Music Information Centre is constantly working to build and improve its network to provide opportunities for Icelandic composers and other musicians. The Centre is active in professional activities, such as the International Association of Music Centres (IAMIC), where the Icelandic Music Information Centre holds a place on the board of the association. The Centre also continuously works to strengthen its network by attending festivals, conferences and events both in Iceland and abroad, which assists in its promotional efforts. Since 2015, the Iceland Music Information Centre has been responsible for an innovation project, Yrkja (to compose), a collaborative project between the Centre and various cultural institutions. The purpose of the project is to prepare new composers for work in a professional environment with bands, festivals and other art institutions. Composers granted an opportunity to work with well known musical groups or musicians then perform at a special concert event hosted by the Yrkja project. Composers work under the guidance of mentors who are already well renowned within the industry for their work.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Iceland Music Information Centre advises numerous composers and musicians on various matters, such as content, marketing and networking nationally and internationally. The Centre also advises composers and musicians on funds and grants that they can apply for, which are listed on the Centre’s website. This includes both domestic and some international funds for composers and musicians. The Centre’s online archive is an ever growing massive database where Icelandic composers can store their work. The Centre also offers individuals the opportunity to rent or sell their work through their database. Since 2015, the Centre’s innovation project Yrkja has given several new, promising composers the opportunity to work with well-known musical groups, festivals and cultural institutions, such as the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, which has been the main collaborator of the project thus far.

Flow of Cultural Goods and Services

Export strategies or measures to support the distribution of cultural goods and services outside your country exist for the following cultural domains: 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Music
Publishing
Your country has granted or benefited from preferential treatment* to support a balanced exchange of cultural goods and services in the last 4 years: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Your country has provided or benefited in the last 4 years from Aid for Trade support, a form of Official Development Assistance (ODA), that helped to build capacities to formulate trade policies, participate in negotiating and implementing agreements that provide a special status to cultural goods and services: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Girls Rock Camp

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Girls Rock! is a volunteer organization working from a feminist perspective to empower young girls, trans, queer and intersex youth through musical creation and equal rights education. The organization’s main focus is the Rock Camp that the organization conducts. The Rock Camp gives participants the opportunity to learn to play instruments, group together and perform in bands, learn about musicians and the many facets of music and the fight for equal rights through music. The Camp concludes with a performance by participants in front of an audience. The Girls Rock Camp has collaborated with the Icelandic Ministry of Foreign Affairs to support the “Girls Rock in Togo” rock summer camp in Togo. The Rock Camps are held in association with the project manager Mirlinda Kuakuvi, female musicians from Togo and Icelandic organization Sun in Togo (Sól í Tógó). These are the first Rock Camps held in Togo and potentially West-Africa as a whole. The Camp is designed for 30-50 girls at the ages of 9-19. The Camp is held annually in the city of Kpalimé between 2018 and 2021. Project manager Kuakuvi also runs a music center in the capital of Lomé for women that also receives funding from the Icelandic Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Girls Rock! is a part of the Girls Rock Camp Alliance (GRCA), an international network of youth centered arts and social justice organizations.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Rock Camp is held annually in August in the city of Kpalimé in Togo. In 2016, Girls Rock! promoted fundraising for instruments to send to the Rock Camps in Togo. Since then, the Camp has received instruments from Iceland every year. In 2017, project manager Kuakuvi opened a music center in the capital of Lomé where she runs musical education programs and music activities for girls year-round. Volunteers have also travelled between Rock Camps in Iceland and Togo to participate in and support each other’s Camps. The initiative has opened a cultural dialogue between residents of Togo and Iceland, providing opportunities for knowledge sharing and mutual cultural expression.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

21,748.68 USD

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Sun in Togo
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Girls Rock!
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Lettie Stuart Pottery in Sierra Leone

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Aurora Foundation
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Aurora Foundation recently received a grant from the Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs for the Lettie Stuart Pottery development project in Sierra Leone. Work on the project is in progress and it is expected to be operational in 2021. For over a decade the Aurora Foundation has been actively working in collaboration with various development projects in Sierra Leone. In spite of Sierra Leone’s incredible beauty and environment rich with natural resources, it has one of the lowest per capita incomes globally. Situated on the Western coast of Africa, Sierra Leone is a place of charming close-knit communities where people with various religious beliefs live together in harmony. The Aurora Foundation operates with the idea that through introducing Icelandic designers to the artisans and craftspeople of Sierra Leone, the different cultural realms are able to exchange ideas, work together and learn from one another to make a profound impact and improve people’s lives.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Implementation of the project will be completed in 2021.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Aurora Foundation
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Treaties and agreements

Multilateral or bilateral trade and/or investment agreements providing a special status to cultural goods and/or services have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negociation: 
NO
Multilateral or bilateral agreements including specific provisions providing a special status to cultural goods and services and digital products in the field of e-commerce have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negotiation: 
NO
Multilateral or bilateral agreements, declarations and/or strategies on relevant policy issues for the diversity of cultural expressions (e.g. education, digital, intellectual property, sustainable development, gender equality, etc.) signed or amended to take into account the objectives or principles of the Convention during the last 4 years: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Capacity Development for Education Programme (CapED) Afghanistan

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry for Foreign Affairs
UNESCO
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In 2019, Iceland renewed its support for the UNESCO Capacity Development for Education Programme and has been focusing on educating girls in Afghanistan. Iceland is a founding member of the CapED Programme through a Nordic/UNESCO MoU signed in 2003. The Programme is a platform for delivery, pulling in the needed expertise from across UNESCO entities and Category 1 Institutes at the right time of country-level implementation and allows UNESCO to operate with a coherent UNESCO approach in order to support Member States to achieve universal quality education for all, an integral part of the sustainable development goal of the UN 2030 Agenda.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Through the Programme, Iceland is able to contribute to a high quality education for girls in Afghanistan, supporting sustainable development and the flow of knowledge and cultural exchange between the two nations.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

The Icelandic Visual Art Copyright Association

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Visual Art Copyright Association
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Design
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Visual Art Copyright Association’s mission is protecting the interests of its stakeholders in copyright related matters. This may refer to reproductions and exhibitions of art, in addition to a continuing effort in raising awareness for the importance of protecting artists’ intellectual property rights. The Icelandic Visual Art Copyright Association is officially recognized by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture as a body working to uphold the rights and interests of visual artists. On behalf of its members, The Association collects fees for the use of copyrighted works. The Association monitors and seeks to influence the development of legislation and regulations as well as business practices operating within the field of copyright issues. The Association also engages in negotiations involving copyright interests between its members and either public or private bodies. The Icelandic Visual Art Copyright Association has two types of grants that are allocated annually, both project grants, as well as travel and education grants. The board of the Association, formed of individuals from various member organizations, decides grant allocations. The Association publishes a list every year of those who receive grants: https://myndstef.is/hofundar/styrkir/styrkthegar/
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Icelandic Visual Art Copyright Association has the role of collecting fees for the right of usage of copyrighted material on behalf of its members. In 2019, the Association had 2,342 members, for whom it provides legal assistance and protection. The Association has also provided written reviews for bills and legislation undergoing the Parliamentary process.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, the Association distributed 78,719.98 USD in allocations (10.75 million ISK).

Icelandic Art Center

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Art Center promotes and supports Icelandic contemporary art internationally through grants, collaborations and projects. The Center facilitates professional partnerships, visitor programs and international artist collaborations. The Center serves as an information hub for curators, press, artists and art institutions. The Icelandic Art Center operates three funds supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. The funds are divided into three categories: the Visual Arts Fund; Travel Grants; and Artist House Bethanien (Künstlerhaus Bethanien). The Visual Arts Fund works in accordance with the Visual Arts Act no. 64/2012. Its objective is to establish provisions regarding the organization and management of matters relating to the visual arts, as well as promoting and creating favorable conditions for visual arts in Iceland. Allocations from the Fund are granted for artists setting up their own exhibitions and those working in the art field in general. These are considered project grants and are divided into a few categories: preparatory grants; grants for smaller exhibitions; grants for larger exhibitions; publication and research grants; and other grants. The amounts allocated to projects should reflect on what scale the project is. The Visual Arts Fund usually makes allocations biannually, but in 2020 a special additional allocation was conducted due to the COVID pandemic. The Travel Grants managed by the Icelandic Art Center are intended for visual artists based in Iceland, who have held professional exhibitions and are planning on exhibiting their artistry. These are primarily intended to ease the mobility of artists and may cover costs of traveling, accommodation and other general travel related expenses. In order to receive a Travel Grant allocation an artist must have a confirmed offer to exhibit their artwork at an art institution, gallery, publisher or similar for the same year that the Grant covers. Travel grants are allocated three times a year. The Artists House Bethanien has signed an agreement with the Icelandic Art Center regarding residencies for Icelandic artists in Berlin. The agreement is made for a five year period, the current being 2020-2025, with each residency spanning one year. This provides artists with a private studio and access to workshops and libraries, with the option of living in the studio.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Various projects from numerous different artists have been supported by the Fund. This has allowed several exhibitions to be executed, broadening cultural expressions nationally as well as the ability of the public to enjoy various diverse works of visual art. In 2019, 129 projects received allocations from the Fund.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 318,541 USD (50.4 million ISK) was allocated from the Fund over the course of two separate allocation periods.

An additional 417,399 USD (57 million ISK) will be allocated in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic as part of the government's response.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Icelandic Art Center
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 3 - Integrate Culture in Sustainable Development Frameworks

National Sustainable Development Policies & Plans

National sustainable development plans and strategies recognize the strategic role of: 
Culture (in general)
Creativity and innovation
Cultural and creative industries
Please rate from 1 to 4 the type of outcomes expected by the inclusion of culture in national sustainable development plans and strategies 1 most often expected outcome 4 least expected outcome): 
Economic (e.g. employment, trade, intellectual property, cultural and creative industries, rural and territorial development): 
1
Social (e.g. social cohesion and inclusion, inequality and poverty reduction, values and identity, vulnerable and minority groups, empowerment and human capital, education): 
1
Environmental (e.g. natural resources, reducing environmental impact of cultural industries and practices): 
1
Cultural (e.g. cultural infrastructure, participation and access to culture, innovation, artists support): 
1
Public cultural bodies and agencies responsible for culture or creative industries are involved in the design and implementation of sustainable development policies and plans (i.e. participate in coordination mechanisms such as joint planning committees): 
YES
Cultural industry-led regeneration initiatives and projects at the regional, urban and/or rural levels have been implemented in the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures facilitate participation in cultural life and access to diverse cultural facilities and expressions, notably addressing the needs of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (e.g. via reduced entrance fees; audience development, arts education and audiences awareness-raising): 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Professional Theatre Groups Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNÍS)
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Performing Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Professional Theatre Groups Fund provides professional performance art groups with grants for projects lasting up to a year. Projects for up to two-year periods may also be supported by the Fund under a framework agreement. The annual budget to professional performance art groups are determined by Parliament every year, with the objective of supporting Icelandic performance art in general and improving the conditions of performance art activities. This funding can be granted to various activities, such as performance art activities, children’s theaters, puppet theaters, operas and dance.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In 2019, the Fund financially supported 19 projects. Nine of the projects were plays, five dance projects, two children’s plays, two puppet theaters and one musical theater project. The theater groups receiving allocations are spread out through the country, with at least one group in every region of Iceland. This gives rural Iceland the opportunity to enjoy and develop high quality art performances, promoting equal access to culture and art throughout the country.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 724,956.06 USD was allocated to the fund from the State Treasury (99 million ISK).

Sports Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNÍS)
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Sports Fund targets sports and youth organizations in the country. Its aim is to promote innovation and sports activities for children and youth, improving sports coaches’ and instructors’ knowledge and proficiency in their work, as well as further promoting the role of sports activities as a preventative measure, providing children and youth with a safe, healthy and structured social environment within which they are able to grow. Grants from the Fund are provided to improve sports facilities and to assist in financing projects that promote sports related activities and educational programs, with a recent emphasis placed on projects that contribute to greater participation of children of foreign descent. Research and development projects in the field of sports science and supporting disciplines, such as biology, health sciences and sociology, may also be supported, provided that their goal is to strengthen the theoretical foundations of sports activities in the country. The Sports Fund operates in accordance with the Sports Act no. 64/1992 and Fund regulations no. 803/2008. The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture annually advertises for applicants to the Sports Fund. The Sports Committee, comprised of five individuals appointed from various mainly sports related organizations to serve over a four-year period at a time, evaluates applications and makes proposals to the Minister of Education, Science and Culture on Fund allocations.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Since the Fund was established in 1998, it has allocated grants annually from a State provided budget. In 2019, out of 124 applications received, 79 were funded, a success ratio of 68%. In 2018, 74 applications were funded out of a total 109 received. The grants allocated go into various projects which are in some cases vital for small sports communities with a low financial threshold. Most funds are divided into project funds intended for sports communities to, for example, update or maintain their equipment or educate instructors and other staff. Some of the most significant grants are provided to research. In 2020, for instance, significant funding was provided to a project that focused on research in the sports community and culture in Iceland before and after the #metoo movement.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, the fund allocated a total of 154,511 USD (21.1 million ISK).

If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The Sports Committee
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Music Fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Ministry of Culture, Science and Education
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Publishing
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Music Fund plays the role of promoting Icelandic music and supporting the distribution of Icelandic musicians and their music. The Fund targets professional musicians, orchestras, bands and choirs. The Fund is divided into two streams: Music, and Marketing. The Music Fund fiscally supports various music projects and concerts across the country. Projects can be on an individual or cooperative basis, musical groups, festivals and various other concerts and events. Projects can be general musical activities as well as promotional and marketing activities for music and professional musicians. Projects are usually funded on a yearly basis and are not intended to cover operational or organizational costs.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Since 2005, the Music Fund has supported numerous musical projects, festivals all over the country and promoted Icelandic musicians and music abroad. The Fund financed the participation of Icelandic composers in the Young Nordic Music (Ung Nordisk Musik) festival in Sweden in 2019, memorial concerts for Grammy nominated composer Johann Johannsson, a children’s music festival in the north of Iceland and concerts in relation to the Gay Pride festival in Iceland. Through the Fund’s support, rural Iceland has an opportunity to throw festivals on a level that would not be possible without financial aid from the Music Fund. The Fund plays an integral role in the promotion of Icelandic musicians and increasing accessibility of the general public, both nationally and internationally, to their works. The Fund gives artists and music event organizers the opportunity to focus on the creative side of their projects rather than the financial viability and profits of the project.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 524,311.66 USD was allocated to the fund from the State Treasury (71.6 million ISK).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNÍS)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

International Cooperation for Sustainable Development

Your country has contributed to or benefited from the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) during the last 4 years: 
YES, my country has contributed to the IFCD
Development cooperation strategies, including South-South cooperation strategies, recognize the strategic role of creativity and diverse cultural expressions: 
NO
If YES, please provide the name(s) of the strategy and year(s) of adoption: 
-
Your country manages multi- and/or bilateral technical assistance and capacity building cooperation programmes supporting: 
-
Value of the total national contribution to the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (in USD): 
943.00
2020
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

The Nordic Council of Ministers

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Nordic Council of Ministers
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Nordic Council of Ministers is the official body for intergovernmental cooperation in the Nordic Region. Overall responsibility for this cooperation lies with the Nordic prime ministers. The day-to-day operations of the Council is handled by the Nordic cooperation ministers and the Nordic committee for cooperation. The Nordic Council of Ministers is a multi-faceted enterprise with numerous agreements and treaties outlining the collaboration occurring between the Nordic countries in various fields. Among these is an agreement concerning cultural cooperation intended to strengthen the cultural bonds within the Nordic community, increasing the combined effectiveness of the contracting parties’ investments in education, research and cultural activities. The Nordic Council of Ministers operates in accordance with its published Strategy for Nordic Cultural Cooperation for the years 2013-2020. Its five key themes revolve around sustainability, creativity, intercultural aspects, youth and digitalization. The strategy emphasizes the importance of communication and collaboration in cultural matters in the Nordic countries. With a broad range of matters to collaborate on, the Council is able to conjoin the efforts of the Nordic countries to address potential challenges in various sectors in an effective and comprehensive manner.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Nordic Council of Ministers has provided fertile ground for cultural expression for decades. Multiple funds and other projects borne from the various agreements that the Council has instituted provide opportunities for individuals in different Nordic countries to generate, experience, or otherwise take part in culturally relevant activities. The Council’s programs encourage the positive and healthy development of cultural activities within the Nordic countries and financially support a great number of such activities. The Council also serves as an acknowledgement of the importance of collaboration by the Nordic countries and how culture has a major impact on other areas of society, such as health, education, and employment.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2020, 2,149 USD is allocated to the council from Iceland (14,517 DKK). The Council's total annual budget in 2020 is 141,257 USD (954,047 DKK).

EEA Grants

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
EEA Grants
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The EEA Grants aim to reduce social and economic inequality, in addition to strengthening bilateral cooperation among the EEA countries and the beneficiary countries. The EEA Grants are jointly funded by the three donor countries, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway, with each contributing according to their size and GDP. Eligibility of the Grants mirrors the criteria set for the EU Cohesion Fund aimed at Member States where the Gross National Income (GNI) per inhabitant is less than 90% of the EU average. Recipients of allocations from the fund during the current funding period are Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. Allocations from the Grants are decided by the Financial Mechanism Office, a committee composed of representatives of the Foreign Ministries of Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. The Grant currently has five priority sectors that allocations are channeled through, focusing on such things as innovation, youth employment and environmental considerations. Culture plays a significant role in the work that the Grants engage in. The vital role of culture in countries’ economies, its role in uniting individuals, increasing stability and innovation is recognized. The Grants follow the Europe 2020 strategy and contribute to smart and sustainable growth, supporting cultural activities such as cultural heritage management, cultural entrepreneurship and artistic activities contributing to sustainable development and social cohesion.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The EEA Grants have supported an incredibly large number of projects in a wide variety of fields in the last 25 years. Since the beginning of the 2014-2021 funding period, over 110 stakeholder consultations have been held, with 95 concept notes finalized by year end 2019, 80 program agreements signed and 149 calls for proposals launched since the first release in 2017. The Grants have provided significant assistance to recipient countries economically, socially and culturally. During the previous funding period of 2009-2014, the EEA Grants allocated 86,754,967 USD (78,600,000 EUR) to the 16 recipient countries at the time, with a large portion of that assigned to projects involving protection of cultural heritage, as well as climate change and energy. During that funding period, Iceland partnered with 181 organizations in 15 countries to work on 401 projects in various fields.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

In 2019, 4,474,223.78 USD was allocated to the fund from the Icelandic State Treasury (611 million ISK).

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNÍS)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
National Energy Authority
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 4 - Promote Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Gender Equality

Ministries, governmental agencies and/or parliamentary bodies in charge of gender equality: 
Exist and are relevant for artists and cultural professionals
Policies and measures to support the full participation of women in cultural life have been implemented during the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures have been adopted to support the recognition and advancement of women as artists, cultural professionals and/or creative entrepreneurs, (e.g. ensure equal pay for equal work or equal access to funding, coaching or mentoring schemes, anti-discrimination measures, etc.): 
YES
Data is regularly collected and disseminated to monitor: 
Gender equality in the culture and media sectors
Participation of women in cultural life
Percentage of total public funds given to female artists and cultural producers: 
52.70%
2016
Percentage of women participation in cultural activities: 
58.40%
2018
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Act on the Equal Status and Equal Rights of Women and Men, No. 10/2008

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Directorate of Equality
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Act on the Equal Status and Equal Rights of Women and Men (Equal Rights Law) took effect in 2008. The aim of the legislation was to establish and maintain equal rights and opportunities for women and men, thus equalizing the status of the genders in all areas of society. Iceland’s policy, as the law demonstrates, is that all individuals should have equal opportunities in using their drive and developing their talents, regardless of gender. The Law is further supported by anti-discrimination laws, such as laws established in 2018 on the equal rights of individuals in society in general (no. 85/2018) and on the labor market (no. 86/2018). The Equal Rights Law was established as an overarching legal framework for Icelandic society to operate by in order to eliminate gender based discrimination. This goal is to be achieved through various means, for example by continually considering equal rights perspectives and working towards gender mainstreaming in policy creation and decision making in all sectors of society; working towards women and men’s equal influence in society; improving the status of women in particular and their opportunities in society; combating pay inequality and other gender based discrimination on the labor market; enabling both women and men in finding harmony between their careers and home lives; promoting education on matters of inequality; analyzing statistical information on a gender basis; Combating gender based violence and sexual harassment; and changing traditional gender stereotypes and combating negative stereotypes about the roles of women and men.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Iceland places a great deal of importance on gender equality. The Equal Rights Law is seen in action throughout Icelandic legislation, regulations and society as a whole. The Law has put pressure on individuals and committees with decision making power to ensure that their actions are in accordance with the Law and ensuring that they do not engage in discriminatory practices. The Icelandic Filmmaking Policy of 2016-2019 for example, takes gender issues into account by calling for an equalization of the roles of both genders within the filmmaking industry by ensuring that financial support from the Icelandic Film Fund to each gender is equal. The Policy also emphasizes appropriate representation from both genders within the various positions held by individuals in filmmaking. The Icelandic Film Centre works in conjunction with the Film Council, a council of seven individuals nominated by the Minister of Education, Science and Culture from various facets of the Icelandic filmmaking industry, to create a system where this progress is measured and evaluated. Allocations from the Film Fund also reflect this legislation and the ideology behind it. While projects that feature a woman in a key role in script writing, direction or production are much more seldom applied for, their success ratios are generally better than that of males. As such, the fund in some way equalizes the support given to various projects and the gender ratio. In 2019 for example, the fund received a total of 57 applications for support in the production of films. A majority, or 66.7% of these projects, had men listed as their directors. Only 31.6% of the projects’ directors were listed as female, with 1.8% registered as both genders. Fund allocations however ended up supporting projects where in 53.6% of cases the director was listed as male, and in 42.9% of cases listed as female, while 3.6% were allocated to both genders. The Artists’ Salary Fund is another example of a fund whose allocations reflect the Equal Rights Law. The Artists’ Salary Fund provides numerous artists every year with the opportunity to pursue their craft. Considering the number of salaried months allocated each year, over the course of the five year period between 2015 and 2019, on average 52.27% of allocations went to women. The Equal Rights Law plays a pivotal role in Iceland’s efforts to achieve gender equality through a legislative framework. The legislation provides the foundation for operating rules and guidelines of institutions and organizations, setting the scene for a society which places great emphasis on gender equality and equal rights in general.

Gender Equality Studies & Training Programme (GEST under the auspices of UNESCO)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Gender Equality Studies and Training Program (GEST) promotes gender equality and social justice in low income countries, conflict and post-conflict societies, through research, training, and education at postgraduate level. Its main target group is professionals working for government and civil society organizations in low income countries and post-conflict societies undergoing reconstruction. The GEST Program is part of GRÓ - Centre for Capacity Development, Sustainability and Societal Change - which comprises of four thematic capacity and development programs: The Geothermal Training Program (GTP), the Fisheries Training Program (FTP), the Land Restoration Training Program (LRT) and the Gender Equality Studies and Training Program (GEST). GRÓ’s mission is to strengthen individual, organizational and institutional capacities in developing and conflict/post-conflict countries to deliver development results in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This work is carried out through capacity development training programs with a focus on the four thematic areas described above. GRÓ is primarily funded by the Icelandic State, as part of the Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs’ development assistance plan. It operates under the auspices of UNESCO as a category 2 institute, aligning the fields of specialization in teaching and research and contributing to the implementation of UNESCO's strategic program objectives.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Since it was established in 2009, a total of 132 students have graduated from the UNU-GEST Program. The UNU-GEST Program has collaborated with several entities for various projects and events. For example, the Program hosted the first ReNEW summer school in May 2019. ReNEW (Reimagining Norden in an Evolving World) is a research hub established in 2018. Its goal is to enhance cooperation to develop new and pathbreaking excellence in research about the Nordic region. The Program also collaborates with RIKK – Institute for Gender, Equality and Difference, a leading institute in the field of women’s gender and equality research in Iceland founded in 1991. Together they host a series of lectures at the National Museum of Iceland from January to May on topics such as climate change and gender equality. The UNU-GEST Program has implemented, in cooperation with the Icelandic Embassy in Malawi, a short training course, Teaching Gender to Youth, in Mangochi. Over 50 participants attended the course, including student teachers, teachers and educational administrators. The Program has also collaborated with the Ugandan Government, specifically the Climate Change Department and Makarere University, with the support of the Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs. A short training course was conducted on Gender and Climate Change in the city of Mbale, Uganda. The course was attended by 30 specialists from the Karamoja region, Bududa district and the city of Mbale to represent different sectors within local governments, as well as representatives of CSOs. In February 2019, UNU-GEST staff attended the “Men, Masculinities and Gender Equality in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean: Interregional dialogues” conference in Mozambique, a collaborative project of UNESCO, MenEngage Alliance, SAfAIDS and HOPEM. The UNU-GEST program is an operational partner of Nordic Women Mediators (NWM) in Iceland. In May 2019 over 50 members of the NWM network convened in Oslo for a two-day annual meeting. In addition to NWM members, seven specialists from Afghanistan, Libya and Yemen were invited to provide insight into the status of women’s engagement and influence in the peace processes in their respective countries. The UNU-GEST program also co-hosted CSW63 side event “Women at the Table! Transformative change - Women shaping the agenda of peace, transitional justice and political agreements” with the Icelandic branch of NWM in collaboration with the Office of the Prime Minister, Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Höfði Reykjavík Peace Centre.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
University of Iceland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
GRÓ - Centre for Capacity Development, Sustainability and Societal Change
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Artistic Freedom

The constitution and/or national regulatory frameworks formally acknowledge: 
The right of artists to create without censorship or intimidation
The right of artists to disseminate and/or perform their artistic works
The right for all citizens to freely enjoy artistic works both in public and in private
The right for all citizens to take part in cultural life without restrictions
Independent bodies are established to receive complaints and/or monitor violations and restrictions to artistic freedom: 
YES
Initiatives to protect artists at risk or in exile have been developed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years (e.g. providing safe houses, guidance and training, etc.): 
NO
Measures and initiatives intended to ensure transparent decision-making on government funding/ state grants and awards for artists exist (e.g. through independent committees, etc.): 
YES
Social protection measures that take the professional status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. health insurance, retirement schemes, unemployment benefits, etc.): 
NO
Economic measures that take the status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. collective agreements, income tax and other regulatory frameworks, etc.): 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Freedom of Expression

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Icelandic State
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In Iceland, the freedom of expression is a constitutional right guaranteed, along with other human rights, by the Icelandic Constitution. The general public, including artists and the press, is thereby guaranteed the freedom to their opinions and convictions, as well as the right to express those. The freedom of expressions is an incredibly important right for both individuals and society as a whole, providing individuals with the ability to freely express themselves. This has a direct impact on society as a whole, providing a legislative foundation upon which laws, regulations and policies are built. It should be noted that the freedom of expression does not protect individuals’ rights to hate speech and other forms of discrimination.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Parliament (Althing)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Measures and Initiatives reported by Civil Society Organizations

Describe how the CSO form has been used to promote collaboration with CSOs in the preparation of this report, including the distribution of the form and the modalities of collection and analysis of the information received. Please indicate the percentage of measures and initiatives received that have been considered as relevant by the Party and included in the QPR.: 
-
GOAL 1 - Support sustainable systems of governance for culture: 

Collaboration of BÍL – Federation of Icelandic Artists with the Icelandic Government on the issues of the arts and culture

Name of CSO(s) responsible for the implementation of the measure/initiative: 
BÍL – Federation of Icelandic Artists
Cultural domains covered by the measure/initiative: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the measure/initiative: 
BÍL has not been directly entrusted with carrying out any tasks related to The Convention, in fact BÍL has not been formally informed of the provisions of The Convention and therefore has not taken it into account in its work. BÍL has therefore not requested to be included in meetings or the work of "the governing bodies", however, BÍL received a request from the Ministry of Education and Culture to contribute to the 2020 Global Report of The Convention. This is a request that BÍL wholeheartedly accepts and regards as an opportunity to broaden its scope, taking the provisions of The Convention into account in the near future. It must be noted that the measure/initiative detailed below has no direct correlation to the Government’s commitment to The Convention, but BÍL feels that it encompasses the aim of GOAL 1: “Support sustainable systems of governance for culture”. It is rooted in a 30 year collaboration between BÍL and The Government on artists' issues, including a dialogue around strategical decisions and public policy in the fields of arts and culture along with public funding of art and cultural activities. This collaboration is based on a written agreement between the parties (BÍL and The Government), the current one dated Nov. 24th 2018, valid until Dec. 31st 2020. Its main goal is to ensure the progress of the state's policy in culture and the arts, as well as to support BÍL's activities in general. It is defined as a consultation on issues of art and artists, support for policymaking, new art forms, promotion of Icelandic art abroad, communication with sister organizations in neighboring countries and participation in multinational collaborations. The agreement does not mention the provisions of The UN Convention on the Protection of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions. In this respect, it can be argued that BÍL’s collaboration with the Government does not entirely adhere to The Cultural Policy for Iceland, approved by Althingi in March 2013, since The Cultural Policy emphasizes the importance of cultural diversity in all aspects. These inconsistencies between the two documents become apparent when they are both examined. A similar inconsistencies appear when The Cultural Policy is compared to chapter (18) in The State Budget’s Financial Plan 2020-2024, approved by Althingi in June 2019, since there is only a single mention of cultural diversity in the Financial Plan and no mention of the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions. Any ambivalence in these basic documents and the execution of Iceland’s Cultural Policy should be addressed, and it is definitely something BÍL will take into consideration when our agreement with the Government will be renewed later this year.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does this measure/initiative receive or has it received International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) funding?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the measure/initiative?: 
One of our successes so far is the production of statistics on arts and culture, a project called for by BÍL and carried out by The National Institute of Statistics in Iceland. Two years ago the Government called for an improvement in the collection of data for the creative sector. The project is still in a developmental phase and can only produce a limited amount of the data called for in the 2018 Global Report, i.e. the number of women working in cultural occupations and industries. Producing other data requested would require substantial effort. In spite of this the project is well underway and is highly promising, partly because it is executed in a collaboration with cultural institutions, organizations and individuals from the creative sector. In Iceland the governance of the arts and design is partly carried out by several centers of the various fields of art and design, one of the focal points being the promotion of art and design internationally. All of these centers rely on official funding for their operation. Under the authority of the Ministry of Education and Culture there has been a consultation group working for a couple of years, dealing with the synchronization and streamlining of these centers activities. The group has submitted a report to the Minister that is currently in development within the Ministry. It is BÍL’s firm believe that this work will increase the strength of the national centers of art and design. A recent example of an active collaboration in the cultural sector is the new Performing Arts Act, adopted by Althingi in Dec. 2019. Parliament held open consultations with the sector while discussing the proposal. BÍL was among the organizations that was consulted; this had a positive impact on the final outcome of the law. It now contains provisions that strengthen the influence of the professional associations of artists in theatre and dance on the sector in general, since these associations now nominate a majority of the members to the board of the National Theater and the Icelandic Dance Company. The focus the Government has on promoting arts and culture for the benefit of children has been of great importance. A fundamental component of this is a temporary fund (2019-2023) that provides grants for projects aimed at children and young people. The allocation rules of the fund emphasizes the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions.
GOAL 2 - Achieve a balanced flow of cultural goods and services and increase the mobility of artists and cultural professionals: 
-
GOAL 3 - Integrate culture in sustainable development frameworks: 
-
GOAL 4 - Promote human rights and fundamental freedoms: 
-
On the basis of the analysis of the responses provided through the CSO form, present up to ten main priorities of CSOs to implement the Convention over the next four years.: 
-

Emerging Transversal Issues

Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Challenges and Achievements

Describe the main results achieved to implement the Convention (at least one major achievement in one of the four goals): 
The fundamental principles of Icelandic cultural policy remain nurturing culture and artists, the arm´s length principle in allocation of project funding, a continued public funding for arts and culture and making arts and culture accessible for everyone while providing a framework for an independent and creative civil society. The Children’s Culture Fund of Iceland was established by the Icelandic Parliament in 2018. The Fund works to fulfil the main goals of the government’s National Cultural Policy about cooperation between schools, civil groups and individuals, as well as the goal of equal access for children and youth to diverse and quality art events despite their living and financial situation. Eligible applicants to the Fund are artists, arts and culture organizations, NGOs, and others engaged in cultural activities for children and youth in accordance with the Cultural Policy. Children's culture refers to projects in the field of art and culture that are prepared for children and/or with the active participation of children. The Fund has financed 78 projects in the two years since it was established. Among the projects the Fund has supported are plays, workshops, podcasts, film and music festivals and other events for children or the participation of them. It funded, for example, the workshop “Girls Rock!”, a feminist project which aims to empower 10-12 year old cis girls, trans children, intersex and nonbinary children through music, as well as an art workshop project for teenagers with learning disabilities.
Describe the main challenges encountered to implement the Convention and the main solutions found or envisaged to overcome them: 
According to data just released by Statistics Iceland nearly one quarter of cultural workers (24.4%) reported being self-employed, compared to 10.6% in other employment. Proportionally fewer immigrants were employed in cultural industries than in other industries in 2019, or 9.1% to 19.6%. The Icelandic government’s economic response to COVID-19 has been criticised for failing to provide relief for self-employed workers and those in the performing arts. Gathering ban restrictions have necessitated the cancellation of numerous events and concerts, meaning that self-employed artists can’t depend on live shows for income. Unemployment for these artists has, predictably, been high and due to the nature of their work there are few, if any, state resources they can turn to for relief. Self-employed artists have found it difficult or not been able to take advantage of the government’s temporary resources or any of the economic relief measures that have been introduced according to Artists Associations. The Government is planning special measures that take into account the nature of the work conditions that self-employed artists are under and hope to find solutions that can help with their problems due to Covid -19. As is noted in the CSO report it can be argued that the collaboration of the Federation of Icelandic Artists with the Government does not entirely adhere to The Cultural Policy for Iceland, approved by Althingi in March 2013, since The Cultural Policy emphasizes the importance of cultural diversity in all aspects. These inconsistencies between the two documents become apparent when they are both examined. A similar inconsistencies appear when The Cultural Policy is compared to chapter (18) in The State Budget’s Financial Plan 2020-2024, approved by Parliament in June 2019, since there is only a single mention of cultural diversity in the Financial Plan and no mention of the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions. It is necessary to address any ambivalence in these basic documents and in the preparation of the renewal of Iceland’s Cultural Policy the proportion of immigrants employed in cultural industries should also be addressed.
Describe the steps planned in the next four years to further implement the Convention and the priority areas identified for future policy action based on the conclusions of the current reporting process: 
A significant portion of Iceland’s cultural policies, legislation, regulation and institutional operational frameworks harmonize with the articles of the Convention and did so prior to Iceland’s acceptance of the Convention. Policies such as the National Cultural Policy create a foundation upon which further cultural policies are built in the spirit of the Convention. While a significant portion of the framework within Iceland’s cultural sphere are already in line with the spirit of the Convention, further work within the sector is able to take the articles of the Convention into account to ensure continued progress. This is evident for example in the formulation of Iceland’s updated National Cultural Policy. Iceland acknowledges the importance of culture in all facets of society and its potential for positive impact, for example on economic, social and environmental levels.

Annexes

Please upload relevant documents (law, policy, agreement, regulation, strategy, etc.), studies and statistics in PDF format related to the implementation of the 4 goals and the 11 areas of monitoring of the Convention in your country. The documents should have been produced during the reporting period covered by this periodic report. Please provide the title and a description of the main content of the document in English or French.: 
-

Submission

Designated official signing the report: 
Title: 
Ms.
First name: 
Áslaug Dóra
Family name: 
Eyjólfsdóttir
Organization: 
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
Position: 
Senior Adviser
Date of submission: 
2020
Electronic Signature: