Quadrennial Periodic Report
South Africa 2022

Quadrennial Periodic Report - cleonn - 02/28/2020 - 11:15

General Information

Technical Information

Name of Party: 
South Africa
Date of Ratification: 
2006
Officially Designated Point of Contact of the Convention: 

QPR Stakeholder

Title: 
Ms.
Address: 
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
202 Madiba Street
Sechaba House
Pretoria Central
Pretoria
0002
South Africa
Phone Number: 
+27124413739
Email: 
CleonN@dac.gov.za
Describe the multi-stakeholder consultation process established for the preparation of this report, including consultations with relevant ministries, public institutions, local governments and civil society organizations.: 

Wits University’s Cultural Policy and Management Division provided the required support with the drafting of South Africa's Quadrennial Periodic Report (QPR). This was based on the model developed by UNESCO through their SIDA project to support countries in preparing their QPRs in 12 countries.
The national contact point, which is the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, invited representatives of government departments, industry associations and civil society to a national meeting held on 17 August 2017. The purpose of this consultative meeting was to inform industry stakeholders of the intention to prepare the 2nd QPR, deliver the QPR Training workshop for a national team and to begin the awareness raising activities for the 2005 Convention with arts and culture representatives from public bodies, academia, the media and civil society.
The 3-day QPR training workshop was held from 20 – 22 September 2017 with a national team made up of representatives from various industry organizations, civil society, academia and government departments. The training followed the UNESCO toolkit on the QPR. The QPR preparation team used information, examples, sources and documents gathered at the workshop as a basis for further research.

Executive summary: 

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, as the lead organization responsible for the activation of the Convention, has adopted a series of strategies, although not all is a direct response to the 2005 Convention. Notably the Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE), which is the most recent strategy to deal with all aspects of the creative and cultural value chain. MGE seeks to establish an enabling environment for the growth and sustainability of cultural industries in South Africa. Over the period of its implementation, this strategy has achieved great success in supporting cultural events, the establishment of the South African Cultural Observatory (SACO) and support for touring ventures nationally and internationally.
It is clear that more advocacy and awareness raising about the 2005 Convention is needed within government, civil society and the private sector but also more broadly in society as a whole. In addition, going forward, the development of projects and programmes inspired by the 2005 Convention needs more consideration. This QPR therefore reports on those areas that most clearly align with the principles and intentions of the 2005 Convention or were informed by the 2005 Convention.
The 2005 Convention informed the Social Cohesion and Nation Building Strategy of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture. The strategy defines Social Cohesion “as the degree of social integration and inclusion in communities and society at large and the extent to which mutual solidarity finds expression among individuals and communities”. This is further linked to nation formation, in turn understood as a process whereby members of a society from diverse origins, histories, languages, cultures and religions come together within the boundaries of a sovereign national state with a unified constitution and legal dispensation, a national public educational system, a shared economy and shared symbols and values, to work for the eradication of divisions and injustices of the past by fostering unity through the promotion a country-wide consciousness of being proudly South Africa. These precepts are also included in the National Development Plan: Vision 2030 (2011) in the Chapters of the Plan dealing with education, skills development, the role of technology and the call to further transform and unify a society still inflicted with inequalities and divisions inherited from the past.
The broadcasting landscape in post-apartheid SA has changed significantly to support an open and democratic society - we have a three-tier system of broadcasting, comprising public, commercial and community broadcasters. There are 16 licensed television operators delivering television services across more than 170 channels to an audience of around 40.1 million people and over 250 licensed radio stations with a weekly audience of around 33.2 million people. In 2008, SA approved the Digital Migration Policy, which set out parameters of migrating the country's broadcasting from analogue to digital in line with international trends. This policy was amended in 2013 to extend the deadline for the migration and include technical requirements for set-top boxes as a transitional measure to convert the transmitted digital terrestrial television signal to analogue. Digital Terrestrial Television will for the first time bring the many benefits of digital technology to terrestrial TV audiences. This means vastly improved video and audio quality, many more channels and a host of value added services.
In South Africa, the Constitution and society give the media extensive freedoms. In turn, media organisations have a responsibility to use these freedoms responsibly and in accordance with the Constitution. The media has a responsibility to give adequate space to the voiceless and the marginalised, without which informed public discourse is not possible. The media plays a critical role in nation building and building non-racialism and non-sexism. They also play a role in building an informed, educated and critically engaged citizenry and in holding government to account. These are critical for democracy to function. Legislation does support the electronic media in promoting progressive values. However the legislative and policy regime has become outdated and narrow, given changes in technology and media platforms. The broadcasting policy review process (undertaken by the Department of Communications) must ensure that the mandate to build the nation and promote constitutional values is strengthened.

Contact details of the stakeholders involved in the preparation of the quadrennial periodic report (QPR). Please also include the contact details of the civil society organizations (CSOs) if they have contributed to the QPR drafting, including through the CSO form.: 
Organization typeOrganizationEmailWebsite
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Southern African Youth Movement (SAYM)
inf@saym.co.za
Public Sector
National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF)
info@nfvf.co.za
Public Sector
National Arts Council (NAC)
info@nac.org.za
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Association of Independent Recording Companies (AIRCO)
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Gauteng Organization of Community Arts and Culture Centres (GOMACC)
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
SA Book Development Council
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Moshito
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Arterial Network South Africa (ANSA)
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
ASSITEJ South Africa
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
National Association of Broadcasters (NAB)
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
South African Screen Federation (SASFED)
Public Sector
South African Cultural Observatory (SACO)
Public Sector
Department of Communications and Digital Technologies
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Visual Arts Network of South Africa (VANSA)
Public Sector
Department of Small Business Development
Public Sector
Department of Higher Education and Training
Public Sector
South African State Theatre
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture

Goal 1 - Support Sustainable Systems of Governance for Culture

Cultural and Creative Sectors

A Ministry (or agency with ministerial status) is responsible for cultural and creative sectors: 
YES
Regional, provincial or local governments or administrations have decentralised responsibilities for policies and measures promoting the cultural and creative sectors:: 
YES
Regulatory frameworks and sector specific laws, policies and/or strategies supporting the cultural and creative industries have been revised or adopted during the last 4 years: 
YES
If YES, has at least one of them been designed through interministerial cooperation (involving different government departments responsible for policy areas, such as communication, education, ICT, trade, foreign affairs, labor, finance): 
YES
Specific education and training programmes in the arts and the cultural and creative sectors are established, including: 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Publishing
Visual arts
Cinema/audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Music
Performing arts
Visual arts
Specific measures and programmes have been implemented over the last 4 years to: 
Support job creation in the cultural and creative sectors
Encourage the formalization and growth of micro/small and medium-sized cultural enterprises
Statistical offices or research bodies have produced data during the last 4 years: 
related to cultural and creative sectors
Share of cultural and creative sectors in Gross Domestic Product (GDP): 
1.70%
2018
Please provide whenever possible disaggregated data by sector: 

Cultural & Natural Heritage - -2.4% Performance & Celebration - 3.4% Visual Arts & Crafts - 5.3% Books & Press - 3.1% Audio-Visual & Interactive Media - 5.2% Design & Creative Services - 0.3% Transversal: Cultural Education - 5.9%

Share of employment in the cultural and creative sectors: 
7.03%
2018
Please provide whenever possible disaggregated data by sector, age, sex and type of employment: 

Employed in creative occupations in creative industries - 0.57% Employed in creative occupations in other industries - 2.2% Employed in support occupations in creative industries - 4.26%

Relevant Policies and Measures: 

The BASA Education Programme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Business and Arts South Africa
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Business and Arts South Africa’s (BASA) Education Programme is part of the commitment to developing innovative educational programmes that seek to ensure the relevance and sustainability of the arts in society. The three-tier BASA Education Programme aims to address the strategic thrust to development and support of the arts:  BASA Basics: This programme is aimed at arts organisations and individuals wishing to start a for-profit or not-for-profit organisation. This is a six month long programme that is for arts organisations at the start up level. The programme aims to introduce emerging artists to the legal registration options and processes available in terms of establishing an arts organisation, and further develop arts organisations to come out with a workable business model in order to take the organisation forward.  BASA Dynamics: This programme is aimed at registered arts organisations with a basic business model and plan. This year-long programme is for arts organisations at the intermediate level and it has been rolled out in 5 provinces. The intention for the intermediate programme is to focus on the strategic objectives developed from the overall strategic business model/plan and delve into specific areas of the business plan needing further strategy and focus.  BASA Established: This programme is aimed at arts organisations that have been in operation for a couple of years but are faced with strategic organisational challenges. This year-long programme challenges their way of thinking in terms of generating income and creating innovative business models to ensure long-term sustainability The three tiers of the Education Programme comprise a series of workshops. The skills learnt during these workshops will equip arts organisations with necessary tools to run sustainable arts organisations. The Dynamic and Established programme are for registered organisations and deal with aspects of strategy, marketing, market development, operations, finance, and governance. The Established Programme includes a mentorship component to supplement the workshop information.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
 BASA Basics: Registration of organisations / companies Access to funding and sponsorships Help delegates / organisations to have their taxes in order  BASA Dynamics: Arts organisations to have benefitted from expert advice and guidance of professional business mentors and facilitators towards better positioning of their organisations to access funding, drive audiences, market themselves and continue to serve their communities.  BASA Established: Organisational development Increased funding and audiences
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
2014:R 1 716 000 ($145134,56) 2015: R1 215 962 ($103551,32) 2016: R855 537 ($72857,53)
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
BASA Basics was rolled out nationally from 2014: 79 delegates have registered their organisations/companies; 39 were able to access funding and sponsorships; and 50 have their tax clearance in order. Delegates in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Bloemfontein have already moved on to participate in the BASA Dynamic Education Programme.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
National Arts Council (NAC)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Rand Merchant Bank (RMB)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
National Lotteries Commission (NLC)
Type of entity: 
Private Sector
Name of partner: 
British Council (BC)

MOSHITO Music Conference and Exhibition

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
MOSHITO Music Conference and Exhibitions (NGO)
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The purpose of Moshito’s music conference and exhibition (held annually in Johannesburg, South Africa) is to broaden the business intelligence of music industry professionals in Africa, strengthen business networks for participants and inform delegates, traders and the public about the multifaceted and dynamic nature of the global music industry. In addition, Moshito seeks to be the largest employer of creative workers during Moshito conference and exhibition and to add value to the City of Johannesburg. Moshito’s scope covers the local, regional, national and international levels: The scope is local, regional and national in that Moshito is registered in South Africa, operates out of Johannesburg where it hosts the conference and exhibition and has sub events in the regional economy of Gauteng. Its reach is international as a core focus of its work is to partner with music markets on the continent and internationally. They now have 16 music markets that have signed a memorandum of agreement to share skills (administration and expertise), and create opportunities for artists and creative workers.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
• Memorandums of agreements with major music markets throughout the globe (they have increased from 6 to 16 in a few years and constantly seeking new partnerships). • Opportunities for members, musicians who attend the music markets each year (5 specialists and 3 bands to each of the 16 music markets). • The reestablishment of Moshito as the premier music market on the African continent • Supporting music festivals in South Africa: currently focused on gospel music with a festival in Ekurhuleni Municipality (in Gauteng province) in partnership with radio station Ukhozi FM. The aim of the festival is to promote the best musicians in popular contemporary gospel music culture while at the same time showcasing and placing value in aspiring and emerging talents that give a voice to the next generation of rising stars in the gospel genre in a family oriented children friendly picnic style environment. • Attract leading music specialists and industry practitioners internationally and nationally. Over 90 international delegates and artists have attended Moshito in the last 3 years, comprising music practitioners, festival promoters, print and radio journalists / presenters, bloggers as well as the International Music Managers Forum. Moshito has, in the past three years introduced live concerts and festivals as part of growing the base for artists performance. • In 2015 Moshito introduced a youth festival comprising of Kwela music, BubbleGum, Afro-Pop, Kwaito, Hip-Hop and other defining music genres such as traditional music and Gospel. It booked a total 62 artists. • Over and above the concerts and festivals mentioned above, Moshito showcased a total of 25 emerging artists (Conference Day Time Showcases = 8, and Braamfontein Evening Showcases = 17). A total of 87 principal artists/groups, and engaging 136 backing musicians/vocalists, were secured and procured for Moshito 2015.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
2016 = R6m ($363 060,00)
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
AIRCO (local producers)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
SAMRO (Composer’s collecting society)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
SAMPA (music promoters)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Regional musicians
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Organisational Funding Support

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
National Arts Council
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The period 2015 - 2018, the NAC launched a number of flagship projects, across its different disciplines that will significantly raise the profile of arts and culture in South Africa. These projects combine innovation, the leveraging of finances, contributions in kind and focused execution to deliver value in line with the NAC’s overall mandate. The objective of this measure is to support the mandate of the NAC by focusing on the following strategic priorities:  Support transformation and redress in the arts.  Contribute to job creation in the arts.  Contribute to the sustainability of arts organisations.  Improve the geographic spread of grant funding allocations.  Support growth and development in the arts.  Support artistic innovation and work relevant to the South African context
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The results expected through the implementation of the measure includes the promotion, enjoyment and development of the arts through the following values: • Economic value • Creative value • Social value • Environmental value • Creation value • Educational value • Therapeutic value
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
The budget allocation towards the measure is approximately R23m annually
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
All eligible organizations working in the arts and culture sector that benefit from NAC funding.

Craft and Design Institute

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Craft and Design Institute
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Design
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Craft and Design Institute is the national craft and design sector development agency with a mission to develop capable people and build responsible creative enterprises trading within local and international markets. It is the official implementing agency for the sector in the Western Cape Province and was identified as a model craft and design hub by the national Department of Trade and Industry, serving as a role model for creative industry development in other provinces of South Africa. The Craft and Design Institute works with craft producers, designers and a wide range of other creative entrepreneurs with a focus on three main programmes:  Product Support Provides an environment in which designers and craft producers can further develop their existing products or prototype new products.  Business Support Helps craft producers and designers to develop skills in creativity, business and production management, and marketing.  Market Support Assists designers and craft producers to define and reach their targeted markets.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
1. Design-ready businesses To ensure sectors of the economy and civil society integrate design into their business and organisational practices to unlock innovation, competitiveness and progress. 2. Business-ready design practitioners To establish an enabling environment that supports a thriving design ecosystem and a competitive design industry. 3. Design in the public sector To ensure the transformation of a public sector into one that embraces design and design-thinking methodology in policy formation and practical implementation across all spheres and tiers of government. 4. Involved citizens To create public awareness and appreciation as to the value of design in every aspect of our lives, in particular towards socio-economic upliftment and a better quality of life for all.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
The 2011/2012 Annual Report notes a budget of R15m ($1,28m) with an allocation of R14.5m ($1,23m) over 3 years (2012-2015) from the R9bn ($0.77bn) National Treasury’s Jobs Fund. The total fund allocation included a 20% own –contribution of R2.9m ($0,25m) from the participating companies.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
However the 2011/12 Annual Report notes: • Three core programmes were expanded in the areas of Product, Business and Market Support, which are supported by Rural Outreach and Communications and Sector Promotion activities. There is now a broad network of services available to help craft producers and designer makers – across the entire province – in all aspects of business management, creative development, production and marketing. In 2011/12 1300 enterprises were supported with business, market and product support, and craft producers generated R4.2 million ($0,36 m) turnover through the CCDI. • The CDI fulfilled orders worth over R2.4 million ($0,2m), providing work opportunities for 308 enterprises. The COP17 Climate Change Conference was particularly significant for the organization as: 15,000 bags, water bottles and other gifts worth over R1,6-million ($0,14 m) were made for the conference and 266 top-end craft pieces were sourced for an exhibition worth R0,5 million ($0,043 m). • Developed an e-Catalogue to reach specific market segments with suitable craft products. A new software programme and retailer database provides valuable information and a solid foundation to better target customers. • Over 300 craft producers took part in eight domestic and six trade events. Their hard work resulted in sales of over R932 000 ($79469,12) and orders worth over R260 000 ($22 141,6). • The Creative Enterprise Training Unit, supported by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA), achieved the following results: − Business and creativity workshop programmes have been integrated and the individual business assistance programme expanded. The CDI now offers business mentoring and group coaching, resulting in more strategic visioning and targeted market reach. − Professional Group meetings have drawn together craft producers working in similar or related media – this has proved to be a great way to network and exchange ideas. − Offered counselling and referral services to 42 enterprises, individual business assistance to 121 enterprises, with 1174 craft producers attending workshops.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
In 2012 the Western Cape Government’s Department of Economic Development and Tourism (DEDAT) collaborated with the CDI
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

National Book Week

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
South African Book Development Council
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Publishing
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
National Book Week is a national awareness campaign to promote the importance of reading and the role that a book plays in building the nation. The SA Book Development Council, in partnership with the Department of Arts and Culture, runs the annual campaign. The campaign aims to engage the public and create awareness around the critical role books play in South Africa’s development so that more people can take action in getting South Africans reading. NBW is a strategic intervention to promote a reading culture that will enhance the prominence and socio-economic impact of the South African books sector both locally and globally.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Results expected through the implementation of the measure includes: • Improving imagination • Increasing intelligence • Boosting brain power • Building vocabulary • Increasing productivity • Improving cultural diversity and social cohesion • Economic empowerment
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The National Survey into the Reading and Book Reading Behaviours of Adult South Africans (2016) determined that reading is critical to fulfilling individual potential and collective social development as: - The degree to which children acquire language skills is a strong predictor of future academic success, educational attainment, employment and income. - Reading is a powerful tool to tackle poverty and inequality: when children read for pleasure, it has a greater effect on their educational achievement than their family’s socioeconomic status. - Reading ability and comprehension promotes social cohesion and innovation by building empathy, critical thinking and imagination. The survey reinforced the importance of reading grounded on five broad strategies: 1. Promote reading for enjoyment to adults, youth and children 2. Increase access to books and stories 3. Promote indigenous language reading and books 4. Implement a coherent book development strategy Increase the importance of books in South Africa 5. Promote indigenous language reading and books
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
South African Book Development Council
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

National Flagship Project in Social Inclusion and the Arts

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
This is a collaborative project between the University of the Free State’s Institute for Reconciliation and Social Justice, Rhodes University and the Nelson Mandela University
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
1. The Arts-based platforms Four interventions feature under this platform. They include:  Research: Continuous research takes place through the Institute for Reconciliation and Social Justice in terms of where cultural expressions and values of minorities in particular are challenged, and how this needs to be addressed. Research outputs include programme and intervention developments, publications, and partnerships.  Arts and Social Justice platforms within the university space: At the UFS, art works are developed to raise awareness about cultural expression and cultural value challenges and are implemented on campus through the Arts and Social Justice programme. Dialogues and on-going research accompany these interventions. Similar interventions take place at RU and at NMU.  Arts curriculum development: Rhodes University and the Nelson Mandela University Art Departments/Schools have instituted curriculum development changes. At Rhodes, Social Justice has been integrated into the third year art student curriculum, enabling students to engage with the broader community of Grahamstown and Rhini on issues of social justice, while the Nelson Mandela University has been integrating a more social justice oriented framework to curriculum interventions across years of study.  Digital Development: The Institute for Reconciliation and Social Justice is currently developing a digital platform promoting and developing the concepts of social inclusion and social justice at the UFS, using the creative arts as the vehicle for communication. Called SoJo (an abbreviated form of the words, Social Justice), the platform is working towards the exploration of how the arts work with the field of the digital humanities in terms of human rights, social justice and social inclusion 2. Student Leadership Development in Social Justice  Leadership for Social Justice (L4SJ): The Institute for Reconciliation and Social Justice, partnering with the Department of Student Affairs, the Centre for Teaching and Learning, faculties, the Office for Research and Innovation and the Office for Internationalisation at the UFS are working on the development of a curricular and co-curricular student leadership and innovation programme in social justice. Designed to engage a student over the first three years of their studies on praxes of social justice and social inclusion and which work towards the development of a culture of social transformation and innovation development at the UFS. The project was piloted in 2018 for first year students (intake was around 6 000 – 7 000 students). From the second year, students will have the option to apply to enrol for the programme, which moves into social justice project implementation at a local level. From the third year, the programme will then move into both a virtual and physical exchange programme with universities from South Africa, the African continent as well as with other university partners from Asia, European Union (EU) and the United States of America (USA). The curriculum framework development for the second and third year programmes are currently underway through the Institute for Reconciliation and Social Justice.  The Global Leadership Summit: Coupled to the L4SJ programme is the continuation of the Global Leadership Summit, a strategic programme aligned to the L4SJ programme, and which brings in its higher education partners from across South Africa, Africa, Asia, the EU and the USA together every three years for reflection on issues of social justice and social inclusion as well as forward planning for new programmes and research. From 2018, the Arts and Social Justice platform will become a central vehicle for exploration and development at the Summit. Curriculum development for the Social Justice Virtual Exchange programme will also take place at the Summit.
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
• Broadly speaking, working towards the development and implementation of programmes aligned with the objectives of the policy framework for Social Inclusion creates a sustainable environment for the nurturing not only of creativity amongst youths, but also the nurturing of responsible citizenship and which places focus on the development of a democracy which works towards social justice and social inclusion of all cultural values and expressions. • At RU and NMU, the arts curriculum changes directly reach approximately 150 youths a year. • At the UFS, SoJo will be made available to a student population of around 38 000 students. • At the UFS, the L4SJ programme will reach between 6 000 – 7 000 first year students and draw in around 600 – 1000 second and third year students each year in a targeted programme. • The UFS Global Leadership Summit (2018) It is expected that around 150 – 170 students, staff and faculty from across the world will attend, with approximately 10 higher education institutions from the USA; 2 – 3 institutions from the EU; 1 – 2 institutions from Asia; and 1 – 7 institutions from South Africa and Africa attending
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
The NAC funded the first year of implementation, 2014/15, to the value of R750 000.00 ($63870). Subsequent years of project implementation have been funded within each of the institutions, usually aligned into existing programmes for budget purposes. Hence the integration of the project at the UFS into the Institute for Reconciliation and Social Justice’ Arts and Social Justice programme, and the alignment of the programme into curricular activities at the Nelson Mandela University and Rhodes University.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The policy framework of the Department of Higher Education and Training, which draws on and aligns with the 2005 Convention, provides a sustainable and innovative regulatory framework for the protection and promotion of a diversity of cultural expressions in higher education institutions.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Underpressure Agency
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

Media Diversity

Public service media has a legal or statutory remit to promote a diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Policies and measures promote content diversity in programming by supporting: 
Regional and/or local broadcasters
Linguistic diversity in media programming
Community programming for marginalised groups (e.g. indigenous peoples, migrants and refugees, etc.)
Socio-cultural programming (e.g. children, youth, people with disabilities, etc.)
Domestic content regulations for audio-visual media exist (e.g. quotas for production or distribution requirements for national films, TV series or music on radio): 
YES
Regulatory authority(ies) monitoring media exist: 
YES
If YES, please provide the name and year of establishment of the regulatory authority(ies): 
The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa is an independent regulatory body of the South African government, established in 2000 by the ICASA Act to regulate both the telecommunications and broadcasting sectors in the public interest
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) monitor: 
Public media
Community media
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) are responsible for: 
Issuing licenses to broadcasters, content providers, platforms
Receiving and addressing public complaints such as online harassment, fake news, hate speech, etc.
Monitoring cultural (including linguistic) obligations
Monitoring gender equality in the media
Monitoring editorial independence of the media
Monitoring diversity in media ownership (diversity of ownership structures, transparency of ownership rules, limits on ownership concentration, etc.)
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Regulations on Local Television Content

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
ICASA - (Independent Communications Authority of South Africa)
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The purpose of the regulations is to protect and promote national and provincial identity, culture and character. Public Television Broadcasting A public television broadcasting licensee must ensure that a minimum of all genres listed below is broadcast: - 35% of its drama programming consists of South African drama; - 80% of its current affairs programming consists of South African current affairs; - 50% of its documentary programming consists of South African documentary programming; - 50% of its knowledge-building programming consists of South African knowledge building programming; - 60% of its educational programming consists of South African educational programming; and - 55% of its children’s programming consists of South African children’s programming. Community Television Broadcasting - A community television broadcasting licensee must ensure that after 24 months of gazetting the regulations in the case of existing licensee or within 24 months of issuing of a licence to a new licensee, or within such longer period as the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) may determine, a minimum weekly average of 65% of its programming during the television performance period must consist of local television content. At least 30% of the 65% quota must be produced from the licensee’s coverage area, increasing by 10% annually until reaching 50% measured over the period of a year and such local television content must be spread evenly throughout the said performance period and prime time. Commercial Television Broadcasting - A commercial television broadcasting licensee must ensure that after 24 months of gazetting the regulations in the case of existing licensee or within 24 months of issuing of a licence to a new licensee, or within such longer period as the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa may determine, a minimum weekly average of 45% of its programming measured, over the period of a year during the South African television performance period consists of local television content. In complying with its obligations in terms of the above paragraph, a commercial television licensee must ensure that a minimum of all genres listed below is broadcast: - 20% of its drama programming consists of South African drama - 50% of its current affairs programming consists of South African current affairs; - 30% of its documentary programming consists of South African documentary programming; - 30% of its knowledge-building programming consists of South African knowledge building programming; and - 25% of its children’s programming consists of South African children’s programming. Subscription Television Broadcasting - - A subscription television broadcasting licensee must ensure that within 24 months of gazetting of the regulations in the case of existing licensee or within 24 months of issuing of a licence to a new licensee or within such longer period as the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa may determine, a minimum of 15% percent of their annual content acquisition budget is spent on local television content programming. - A subscription broadcasting service licensee that acquires channels must ensure that, a minimum of 15% of their total annual channel acquisition budget, measured across its service as a whole, is spent on channels with local television content that are compiled and up linked from South Africa. - The broadcasting by a subscription television broadcasting licensee of licensed free-to-air public television broadcasting services, licensed free-to-air commercial broadcasting services and licensed community television broadcasting services will not count towards its compliance. Independent Television Production - Public, commercial, community and subscription television broadcasting licensees must ensure that a minimum of 40% of their local television content programming consists of programmes which are independent television productions and the independent television productions are spread evenly between South African arts programming, South African drama, South African documentary, South African knowledge-building, South African children’s and South African education programming. - A public, commercial and subscription television broadcasting licensee must ensure after 24 months of the gazetting of these regulations or such longer period as the Authority may determine, that 50% of annual independently produced programmed budget is spent on previously marginalised local African languages and/or programmes commissioned from regions outside the Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg Metropolitan cities.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Through the implementation of the regulations, it is expected that: - programming is produced under South African creative control; - programming is identifiably South African, and recognises the diversity of all cultural backgrounds in South African society; - programming will develop a television industry which is owned and controlled by South Africans; - programming will establish a vibrant, dynamic, creative and economically productive South African film and television industry
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
The financial implications of this local content regulation are borne by the respective broadcaster.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Regulations apply to all broadcasters registered with the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa either as public, commercial, community or subscription television broadcasters.

Digital Environment

Policies, measures or mechanisms are in place to support the digital transformation of cultural and creative industries and institutions (e.g. funding for digitization of analogue industries): 
NO
Policies or measures have been introduced to ensure vibrant domestic digital cultural and creative industries markets with a diversity of e-players of all sizes (e.g. fair remuneration rules; control market concentration; prevention of monopolies of digital content providers/distributors or their algorithms that potentially restrict the diversity of cultural expressions, etc.):: 
NO
Policies and measures have been implemented to enhance access to and discoverability of domestically produced cultural content in the digital environment (e.g. action plans or policies for digital content pluralism, public support to cultural or artistic portals in specific languages, national or regional online distribution platforms for domestic content, etc.): 
NO
Measures and initiatives have been implemented to promote digital creativity and competencies of artists and other cultural professionals working with new technologies (e.g. spaces for experimentation, incubators, etc.): 
NO
Statistics or studies with recent data on access to digital media, including on the type of cultural content available through digital media, are available: 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Partnering with Civil Society

Professional organizations and/or trade unions representing artists and/or cultural professionals in the following sectors exist in your country (i.e. federation of musicians, publishers unions, etc.): 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Public funding schemes supporting CSOs involvement in promoting the diversity of cultural expressions exist: 
YES
Training and mentoring opportunities were organized or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years to build skills on communication, advocacy and/or fundraising of civil society organizations involved in the promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Dialogue mechanisms between public authorities and CSOs for cultural policy making and/or monitoring have been implemented during the last 4 years (meetings, working groups, etc.): 
YES
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has held various consultative sessions on the revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage.
Civil society organisations, including Arterial Network SA, ASSITEJ SA, SA Guild of Actors, Musicians Association of SA, SA Freelancers Organisation, Freedom of Expression Institute, Documentary Filmmakers, Association, Media Monitoring Africa, South African Screen Federation, Southern African Regional Universities Association, and others made submissions to Parliament around the bills regarding the Lotteries Amendment Act No 32 of 2013, and the Copyright (Amendment) Bill 2014
Policies and measures promoting the diversity of cultural expressions have been elaborated in consultation with CSOs during the last 4 years: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The revised White Paper aims to addresses the challenges of inequality, poverty, unemployment and persistent divisions based on race, gender, economic and other factors of exclusions. The intention is to effectively contribute to building a cohesive and united society in which everyone has access to arts, culture and heritage, resources, facilities and opportunities framed by the following objectives:Firstly, to align the revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage with the core mandate of the Ministry of providing arts, culture and heritage services, facilities, funds and resources; contribute to addressing poverty and job creation; and promote social cohesion and nation-building by providing access, resources and facilities to all who live in South Africa, with special attention paid to injustices and imbalances of the past.Secondly, to base the revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage on the fundamental right to culture, artistic creativity, language, and intellectual and artistic freedom as enshrined in the Bill of Rights in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (1996); The National Development 7Plan: Vision for 2030 (2011); the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (1981); the Charter for African Cultural Renaissance (2006); the UNESCO Declaration on Cultural Diversity (2001); the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage (2003); Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (2005); and the African Union’s Agenda 2063 (2014).Thirdly, to harness art, culture and heritage as creative, innovative, educational social development practices with the economic capacities for transforming South Africa into an inclusive society based on actual equality.Fourthly, to reconfigure the existing art, culture and heritage sector and the policies underpinning it to eliminate duplication and hasten transformation to enable the accelerated transformation and optimal performance of the sector in relation to current social, educational and economic policies.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The White Paper has been approved in 2019 and its implementation has started. In implementing the policy, it is anticipated that the overall impact on the creative economy will be: Positioning the arts as a valuable contributor to economic growth and job creation.Stimulating economic development. Creating linkages with creative industries across the African continent as well as internationally to seek exchanges and enrich South African arts, culture and heritage practitioners and businesses.Promote sustainability across the arts, Culture and Heritage sector. Raising the profile of South Africa as a destination for cultural consumers and increasing tourism (visitor) volume and spend. Building the professional capacity of the sector.Improving the production and dissemination of local content.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
All national and provincial departments responsible for Arts, Culture and Heritage
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
All Arts, Culture and Heritage entities of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 2 - Achieve a Balanced Flow of Cultural Goods and Services and Increase the Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Please indicate if the following policies and measures exist in your country: 
Policies and measures supporting the outward mobility of artists and cultural professionals (e.g. export offices, support for participation in international cultural markets for cultural professionals, etc.)
Please indicate if the following operational programmes have been developed or supported/funded by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Major cultural events (e.g. cultural seasons, festivals, cultural industries markets, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Please indicate if the following mobility funds (e.g. scholarships, travel grants, etc.) have been managed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Public funds supporting the outward mobility of national or resident artists and other cultural professionals
Public funds supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and other cultural professionals, notably from developing countries
Public funds specifically supporting the mobility of artists and other cultural professionals from or between developing countries, including through North-South-South and South-South cooperation
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Cultural Seasons

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
National Department of Arts and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Music
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Cultural Seasons programme is intended as a vehicle to deepen South Africa’s cultural links with the rest of the world. These programmes significantly enhanced SA’s bilateral and cultural relations with these countries, and brought concrete benefits to SA artists and institutions. The features include showcases of a diversity of cultural expressions in the partner countries; participation in key international festivals and events; networking with promoters, distributors and producers to secure future engagements; educational events, master classes, dialogue sessions and colloquia highlighting values, culture and heritage; media engagements (TV, radio, print) to highlight and promote activities and speak to the purpose of the seasons; establish greater collaboration and cooperation between departments of government, civil society, media agencies, and with arts, culture and heritage organisations and stakeholders within host country; and, to focus financial resources (government and private) and administrative efforts (national government and its entities) to realizing the objectives of the seasons.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Seasons, as a component of the Department of Arts and Culture’s Cultural Diplomacy Strategy, are expected to promote the country’s value systems and cultural identities through various genres of culture including art, science, music, gastronomy and education. It is expected that the cultural sector will be strengthened, that the seasons will lead to further opportunities for showcasing, for trade and for opportunities for artists and practitioners, and that greater collaboration and cooperation between departments of government and across the tiers of government will be achieved, as well as between government and civil society, media agencies, and with arts, culture and heritage organisations and stakeholders within host country.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The French season has been evaluated with substantial reporting on other seasons. The evaluation report prepared by the National Arts Council (the lead implementing organisations for this season) on the South Africa-France Seasons contains a key section on objectives, successes and impact, some of which are recorded here. The Commissioners General, Bongani Tembe and Laurent Clavel, noted in 2013 that ‘the Seasons saw over 1000 South African and French citizens travelling to each other’s countries and an immediate benefit of this has been the increase in the number of French tourists to SA in 2013’. The CG for South Africa, Bongani Tembe highlighted a link between the French and UK seasons: the French Seasons has ‘enabled the refining and packaging of product for the UK Seasons, with 40-60% of the UK Seasons being drawn from the French Seasons’. In effect the French seasons created arts and culture product which was being exported, in addition to products from other sectors. Evaluation evidence included: − Waiving of visa fees for all 1011 participants visiting France over a seven-month period. − Support from SA Revenue Services with regards to goods for temporary importation (e.g. artworks/ stage sets). − Participation of partners (269 South African and 186 French). − Implementation of 15 reciprocal projects. − 350 media houses covering the seasons with 1026 media mentions. − 16% increase in French tourism to South Africa. − 233 projects in more than 150 cities across France. − Strong messages of support from other partners for the seasons (Ghana, Argentina for instance). − Advertising value in the region of R28m ($2,38 m). − PR Value of R84m ($7,15 m). − 1800 jobs created for 632 male and 379 females with 577 for the youth. − Legacy projects established such as the signing of an agreement between the Instittut national de l’audiovisuel (INA) and the DAC; Seminar: an Anthology of Poetry; and a Children’s Parliament as well as a publication by Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund of learners’ experiences of Children’s Parliament. In addition a strong multiplier effect was evidenced from the consolidated partner-to-partner relationships. A few of these are noted here: − Kunjanimation/Annecy, a reciprocal project between Animation SA and Gobelins (Animation School in France) and a strong presence at Annecy Film Festival in 2013. A South African studio offered the opportunity to produce a 2D animation series for a French studio. The local SA animation industry was in talks with the Department of Trade and Industry to adopt a cluster model presented to SA, which would create many opportunities for South African animation businesses and creators. − Dada Masilo’s Swan Lake played to sold-out houses at the Theatre Rond du Pont in Paris for three weeks. The production toured for four months in France. This further resulted in an invitation to Rome for the 15 young South African dancers who benefitted from extensive employment. − Kudu, a reciprocal project between Vuyani Dance Company and French musician, Eric Truffaz, successfully received in South Africa and France was invited for further performances in France (April 2014). − Via Katlehong participated in various performances resulting in a three month tour providing employment for 19 youth. The production continued to tour to more than 20 cities across France, and was also invited to Poland. − Delft Big Band Youth music development band from Delft, Western Cape, partnered with Burgundy Province, and was invited to perform in various cities across France. This project provided a remarkable opportunity for impoverished youth to travel abroad and display their musical talent resulting in strong social upliftment. − Ouroboros Puppet Show, as part of Festival Mondial de Marionettes Handspring Puppet Company, was invited to return to France as part of a six-week tour. − The My Joburg exhibition at La Maison Rouge was a three-month visual art exhibition at a prominent gallery in Paris, exhibiting the works of 57 South African artists. Due the success, the exhibition was invited to Dresden, Germany from October 2013 – January 2015. − Ster City, a theatre production hosted at Festival d‘Avignon and Festival des Metallos was invited to tour 17 African countries in October/November 2014. − More than 800 artists travelled to the UK to perform in more than 15 cities across the UK − The SA government invested more than R20 million in this stream of the programme. The UK partners (major arts festivals, arts institutions, arts council and performing arts institutions) contributed more than R60 million to the initiative. − In a partnership with the Edinburgh International Festival, South African artists participated in 6 different categories across the festival. They were able to secure future invitations to tour nationally and internationally. − 3 South African fashion designers were amongst 130 emerging designers from 30 countries in the largest public fashion exhibition of its kind at the international Fashion Showcase in London. − Two octogenarians were included, namely Abdullah Ibrahim (jazz pianist) performing at London’s Southbank Centre and Esther Mahlangu (Ndebele artist) with an illustrative solo exhibition at the Irma Stern Museum in Cape Town. Both events were part of their 80th birthday celebrations. − Young artist, Bokani Dyer (Standard Bank young artist award winner and pianist) teamed up with UK counterparts for a series of workshops and music education events, live performances and jam sessions. − To promote multiculturalism and cross-cultural understanding and tolerance, and deepen the experience and knowledge of other cultures, 133 screenings of 25 films were screened across 47 venues in the UK. Two films were picked by UK distributors for release (Hear me Move and Four Corners). Critical lessons learnt include inter-alia: − The lack of involvement by other national or provincial departments led to the creation of ‘partner platforms’ to seek buy-in and keep lines of communication open. − Different legal frameworks in partner countries led to appointment of local staff with translation competency and gaining prior knowledge of legal frameworks within which to plan. − High volume of travel and movement of artistic goods and equipment in a concentrated period with unusual travel routes requested led to a decision to set travel parameters and seek reciprocal agreement with regards to customs clearances. − The limited provincial reach, lack of awareness of Seasons within arts communities and applications received from France without a South African partner led to information kits for provinces to guide participation in Seasons, the creation of platforms for provincial participation, and the setting of targets for different genres/ levels of entry and provincial spread. − For the South African Season in France there were expectations from SA partners for NAC to source French partners with the short lead times, lack of seek funding leading to inability of SA artists to secure venues in France. − The lack of corporate sponsorship to strengthen programme and the uneven spread of provincial participation. − Poor showing of SA craft, or legacy projects and limited presence of SA team at events led to the need to seek partnerships with art fairs that could result in sales of works. − Secure venues for visual and performing arts well in advance, establish a mechanism for new / changed projects during Season. − Design sponsorship packages for different genres or key events, set targets for different genres / levels of entry / provincial spread, − Appoint a curator for craft exhibitions incorporating widespread of SA craft, need to find key projects that can result in legacy projects and budget for project coordinators to travel to host country for more events and/or appoint bigger staff complement in host country. − The limited reach for skills development, particularly among emerging artists led to new partnerships facilitated with local and overseas institutions to allow for a greater awareness. − Amounts of finance and funding, timeous payments and unexpected costs (such as freight) were a key challenge with the need to create varied and relevant contracts for partners, enable urgent payments, and in some instances, emergency funds, clearly define reporting requirements and ensure tranche payments are made timeously.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The National Arts Council
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Africa Month Programme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
National Department of Arts and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Music
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Africa month programme, which celebrates Africa in South Africa, is a response by the South Africa Government to the call by the African Union to build a better Africa and a better world as outlined in the Charter for African Cultural Renaissance and other African Union instruments. This Charter was signed by the Minister of Arts and Culture on 25 May 2012 and was ratified by Cabinet and adopted by Parliament in 2013.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The results expected through the implementation of the measure includes the following:  To develop pride in the rich and diverse cultures of the Continent.  To enable collective efforts by member states to liberate the African continent from many challenges such as slow economic growth, social ills, wars, cultural barriers.  To strengthen diplomacy in the continent.  To engage in conversation within the broader theme of ‘Decolonisation’
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
The total spent was R34 733 510 ($2957905).
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
The overview evaluation suggests that while the participation of youth in cultural programmes and activities targeted at women have increased, ‘there is room for improvement, especially reaching out to talented and artistic young women that are currently exploited and wasted in the township and rural areas’. Communication and marketing were improved through live streaming of events, live crossing, interviews, promos, generic adverts on TV and Radio including airport screens and visibility of branding at events. Key print and radio media were present at the launch of Africa Month, the Africa Month dialogue, with media coverage in major Sunday newspapers. A 4-page publication to supplement the Budget Vote was distributed in major newspapers while radio supported generic adverts for the Campaign Messaging in 11 languages and hosted numerous discussions and interviews with African writers and thinkers, panel discussions with Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Advocate Sipho Mantula and Mam Mathobo Kunene as well as the Minister of Arts and Culture. 13 African countries participated in various activities around the country (Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, DRC, Egypt, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Senegal, Sudan, Tunisia, Western Sahara, Zimbabwe) with South Africa hosting 41 countries from across the continent.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The measure was implemented by a number of organizations (universities, cultural institutions, arts organizations) and in partnership with the provincial Departments of Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation. A number of events took place in collaboration wi

!KAURU Contemporary Art Project

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
!Kauru Contemporary Art Project
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
!KAURU Contemporary Art Project began in 2012 as a vehicle for educating the public about the role of art in society. It was conceptualised as a platform for cross-border/cross-regional engagement and discourse between South African creatives and their counterparts across the African continent. The Project is focused on dialogue around social and economic cohesion, transformation and access within the creative sectors in South Africa but also across the continent to strengthen engagement and build sustained relationships with creatives on the African continent.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The results expected through the implementation of the measure? • To showcase the finest of African contemporary art. • Sensitize and mobilize South African/African audiences and media to appreciate African visual art. • Promote inter Africa/diaspora cultural exchange in a direct and meaningful way. • Create a network and visibility for artists, artist promoters, academia, and cultural institutions. • Skills transfer, empower young and up coming local artists through skills development workshops and community outreach programs. • !KAURU not only recognizes the visual arts as a means to celebrate heritage, but it strives to position the visual arts as an important contributor to the economy of the region and stimulate ongoing investment in this field.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
From 2012 to 2017, between R1, 500, 000.00 ($0,13) to R2, 500,000.00 ($0,21) (more recently in 2017)
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Department of Arts and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Department of International Relations and Cooperation
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Flow of Cultural Goods and Services

Export strategies or measures to support the distribution of cultural goods and services outside your country exist for the following cultural domains: 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Music
Your country has granted or benefited from preferential treatment* to support a balanced exchange of cultural goods and services in the last 4 years: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Your country has provided or benefited in the last 4 years from Aid for Trade support, a form of Official Development Assistance (ODA), that helped to build capacities to formulate trade policies, participate in negotiating and implementing agreements that provide a special status to cultural goods and services: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Concerts SA

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
SA Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO)
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Music
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Concerts SA is a joint South African/Norwegian live music development project housed within the SAMRO Foundation, supported (financially, technically, administratively) by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, SAMRO, the SAMRO Foundation and Concerts Norway. Working with musicians, promoters, venue owners and audiences, and providing support to the sector through research and skills development for music professionals, the project aims to build a vibrant and viable live music circuit in southern Africa.The primary beneficiaries of the programme are established and emerging musicians, audiences both in urban and rural areas, children and youth and local promoters/concert organisers. From 2012 the project focussed on developing circuits in three provinces (Gauteng, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal) and their wider connection into urban centres across the Southern African region through a mobility fund.The core activities of Concerts SA include:Commissioning research and advocacy material related to the size, shape and strategic positioning of the live music field in South Africa.Subsidising a network of urban venues to present a regularised programme of live music, investing in fees for a mix of established and emergent musicians, and enhanced marketing and communications of live performances.Engaging promoters in the programming of live music in schools and community venues in township, peri-urban and small town contexts.Managing a mobility fund enabling South African musicians to tour nationally and in the SADC region.Convening workshops and skills/knowledge exchange initiatives with stakeholders in the live music field.Together with Rikskonsertene/Kulturtanken, managing a modest programme of artistic and professional exchange with the music industry in Norway.Engaging with a variety of potential funders and partners at a local, provincial, national and international level in seeking to ensure the sustainability and growth of the programme.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
To ensure that concert circuits for live music performance in both urban and rural areas in South Africa with a particular focus on previously disadvantaged areas and regions are established.Emerging concert promoters from previously disadvantaged communities supported.Venue owners are supported to host regular live music performances in collaboration with local municipalities and provincial authorities.Both established and emerging artists are programmed to perform in the circuits.School concert circuits are established, enabling youth and children from disadvantaged communities to experience live music from South Africa, SADC and Norway.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
SA Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO) (Not for profit company)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Treaties and agreements

Multilateral or bilateral trade and/or investment agreements providing a special status to cultural goods and/or services have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negociation: 
NO
Multilateral or bilateral agreements including specific provisions providing a special status to cultural goods and services and digital products in the field of e-commerce have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negotiation: 
NO
Multilateral or bilateral agreements, declarations and/or strategies on relevant policy issues for the diversity of cultural expressions (e.g. education, digital, intellectual property, sustainable development, gender equality, etc.) signed or amended to take into account the objectives or principles of the Convention during the last 4 years: 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Arts, Culture and Heritage Bilateral Agreements

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The main objectives of our bilateral agreements are:To promote and showcase South African arts, culture and heritage to international fora and audiences.To provide a platform for market access of cultural goods and services.To exchange expertise, through technical exchange programmes.To promote South-South and North-South cooperation.To support the mobility of artists
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Cultural relations have been strengthened through the joint implementation of cultural agreements and film co-production treaties.Through cultural agreements we have been able to promote our cultural diversity and promote inter-cultural dialogues between countries.Agreements provided a platform to exchange expertise and technical skills in arts, culture and heritage.Promote access of markets for our cultural goods and services.Provides an opportunity to showcase other areas of cooperation in economics, technology, tourism, innovation and education, sharing knowledge and skills through our cultural seasons programme with countries.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Department of International Relations and Cooperation
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 3 - Integrate Culture in Sustainable Development Frameworks

National Sustainable Development Policies & Plans

National sustainable development plans and strategies recognize the strategic role of: 
Culture (in general)
Please rate from 1 to 4 the type of outcomes expected by the inclusion of culture in national sustainable development plans and strategies 1 most often expected outcome 4 least expected outcome): 
Economic (e.g. employment, trade, intellectual property, cultural and creative industries, rural and territorial development): 
1
Social (e.g. social cohesion and inclusion, inequality and poverty reduction, values and identity, vulnerable and minority groups, empowerment and human capital, education): 
1
Environmental (e.g. natural resources, reducing environmental impact of cultural industries and practices): 
4
Cultural (e.g. cultural infrastructure, participation and access to culture, innovation, artists support): 
3
Public cultural bodies and agencies responsible for culture or creative industries are involved in the design and implementation of sustainable development policies and plans (i.e. participate in coordination mechanisms such as joint planning committees): 
-
Cultural industry-led regeneration initiatives and projects at the regional, urban and/or rural levels have been implemented in the last 4 years: 
NO
Policies and measures facilitate participation in cultural life and access to diverse cultural facilities and expressions, notably addressing the needs of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (e.g. via reduced entrance fees; audience development, arts education and audiences awareness-raising): 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Exports Marketing and Investment Assistance Scheme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Trade Industry and Competition
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Music
Publishing
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The national Department of Trade, Industry and Competition administers a set of incentive programmes, which fall into the following incentive clusters, namely the Broadening Participation Cluster, Competitiveness Investment Cluster, Services Investment Cluster, Manufacturing Investment Cluster and Infrastructure Support Cluster. The following incentives are applicable to cultural expressions with relevance to the 2005 Convention.Competitiveness Investment Cluster: Export Marketing and Investment Assistance (EMIA)EMIA scheme seeks to assist South African exporters to establish export markets for their products; to partially compensate exporters for costs incurred for activities aimed at developing export markets for South African manufactured products and services; and to recruit new foreign direct investment into South Africa. Registered companies in the film and television, music and craft sectors have benefitted from this scheme by participating for example at the SA Handmade Collection, the India International Trade Fair, Ambiente (Germany), International Handicraft and Gift Fair in Kocaeli (Turkey), International Folk Art Market (USA) and the Asia Content and Entertainment Fair (South Korea).Competitiveness Investment Cluster: Sector Specific Assistance Scheme (SSAS)The SSA Scheme seeks to develop an industry sector as a whole, broaden the export database and promote broader participation of black-owned Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs) in the economy. The scheme has assisted a broad range of project coordinators, including the Association for Transformation in Film and Television, the Cape Film Commission, the Jewellery Council of South Africa, Publishers Association of South Africa, the South African Association for Creative Industries, the Independent Music Exporters South Africa as well as the Craft and Design Institute.Services Investment Cluster: Film and TV Production incentiveGovernment, through the Department of Trade and Industry, offers film and television production incentives to promote the country’s film production and post-production industry. The incentives comprise the Foreign Film and Television Production and Postproduction Incentive, which aims to attract foreign-based film productions to be shot in South Africa and conducting post-production activities; and the South African Film and Television Production and Co-Production Incentive, which aims to assist local film producers in the production of local content. The sub-programme, South African Emerging Black Filmmakers Incentive, has been added to the South African Film and Television Production and Co-production Incentive with the aim of assisting local emerging black filmmakers to grow and to take on larger productions that will create employment.The Export Marketing and Investment Assistance (EMIA) scheme develops export markets for South African products and services and to recruit new foreign direct investment into the country.The key objectives of the measure are as follows:●          To expand economic participation to ensure the development of sustainable and competitive enterprises.            ●          To promote the growth of South African-manufactured goods and services in the local and global economy.●          To provide funding to non-profit business organisations in sectors and sub-sectors prioritised by the DTIC, as long as the purpose of the organisation and/or its proposed project aims to conform to the DTICs export strategy.●          To contribute to creating employment, enhancing the international profile and export revenue of offshoring services, and increasing the country’s creative and technical skills base
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
EMIA scheme assisted as follows:Assisted exporters to establish export markets for their products;Partially compensate exporters for costs incurred for activities aimed at developing export markets for South African manufactured products and services;Recruit new foreign direct investment into South Africa.Exporters can apply for any of the four EMIA sub-programmes: Individual Exhibition, Primary Market Research, Foreign Direct Investment, and Individual Inward-Bound Missions.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Department of Trade, Industry and Competition
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

International Cooperation for Sustainable Development

Your country has contributed to or benefited from the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) during the last 4 years: 
YES, my country has contributed to the IFCD
YES, a public body or a non-governmental organization in my country has benefited from the IFCD
Development cooperation strategies, including South-South cooperation strategies, recognize the strategic role of creativity and diverse cultural expressions: 
NO
If YES, please provide the name(s) of the strategy and year(s) of adoption: 
-
Your country manages multi- and/or bilateral technical assistance and capacity building cooperation programmes supporting: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Intergovernmental coordination: The Presidential Creative Industries Task Team of Deputy Ministers

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Presidency
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Task Team is mandated to effectively intervene against piracy and intellectual property and copyright infringement, increase local content, enable the media to foster values and drive social cohesion and nation building, and extend social welfare and social insurance coverage and income smoothing to artists and skills development. The team has embarked on various interventions and consultations to unlock and optimise the performance industry throughout the value chain, including meeting with industry representatives. Each department that contributes on the task team is assigned key deliverables, to deal with specific areas affecting the creative industries.The work of the Task Team supports government’s Mzansi Golden Economy, which facilities employment creation, enhances both social equity and competitiveness and mobilises domestic investment around activities that could create sustainable employment. Working with many industry players and across government departments, the Task Team initiated a number of interventions to unlock and optimize the performance industry throughout the value chain some of which include the introduction of the Copyright Amendment Bill and the Performers Protection Bill to Parliament; improvement of frequency of anti-piracy raids etc.The same key deliverables are also assigned to state agencies, which are responsible for specific sectors, such as the National Arts Council and the Industrial Development Corporations Media and Motion Picture Division.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Coordination across a number of departments, namely Presidency, Arts and Culture, Communications, Social Development, National Treasury, Police, Higher Education and Training, and Trade and Industry as well as Labour in matters affecting artists, creative workers and the creative industries more generally.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Cultural and Creative Industries Federation
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Artists and organisations engage with cultural expressions and climate justice (NGOs)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Various NGOs listed in h
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The main objective of the measure is for cultural and creative industries to make connections between climate change and other pressing environmental issues, enabling a new perspective on its urgency and relevance to society, the economy and to government.The projects and programmes are ad hoc and unrelated to a specific government policy or directive and have been undertaken, in the main by independent artists, arts organisations and NGOs around the country. Responses to environmental challenges have been identified in sectors such as craft, design, festivals and outdoor events, theatre, visual arts, fashion and architecture.The projects and practices listed address the following environmental issues in their work: •           Food production and innovation •           Water conservation •           Energy generation •           Waste reduction and closed loop recycling•           Sustainable transport•           Pollution (e.g. mining) •           Biodiversity conservation •           ReforestationThey do this through the ‘Seven Trends’ of creative climate action adapted from Julie’s Bicycle including i.          Artwork ii.          Art activism iii.         Connection with nature iv.         Education and behaviour change v.         Circular economy vi.         Sustainable infrastructure vii.        Creative collaborations viii.       Conservation ix.         Transition
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In putting together a report on these projects and programmes, produced by researcher Sholeh Jonhston in collaboration with the National Arts Council of South Africa and Vrystaat Arts Festival are to -           Establish processes that connect people across the South African movement of creative and cultural change-makers and create a sense of community and shared purpose.-           Make the role of culture in meeting environmental and social challenges in South Africa visible to the cultural sector itself, key strategic organisations and funders of cultural activity, policymakers in the fields of culture, environment and human rights, and the international cultural (and cultural policy) community. -           Lay the foundations for how cultural policy makers and other strategic stakeholders can better support and maximise the impact of cultural leadership on environmental issues. -           Articulate the diversity of responses already taking place and begin to gather learning that could be shared to further inspire action and optimise impact.-           Capture the impact that this activity is having on society and the environment, and if data is not available, provide recommendations on how this impact could be captured
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
National Festivals such as Afrika Burn, Vrystaat Arts Festival, Eco Film Festival, Well Worn Theatre Company, Outreach Foundation, Greenpop
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Artists such as Blessing Ngobeni, Claire Rousell, Gregory Maqoma (Johannesburg), Hannelie Coetzee (Johannesburg), Kai Lossgott, Kevin Kimwelle, Linzi Lewis, Mandy Coppes, Mbongeni Richman Buthelezi, Santo Mofokeng, Willem Boshoff (Johannesburg), Virginia
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
- Institutions: Craft and Design Institute (National), Design Society Development DESIS lab (Johannesburg), Green Building Council, Iziko Museums (Cape Town)
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
- Academia: Dylan McGarry (Environmental Learning Research Centre, Rhodes University), The Sustainability Institute (Stellenbosch), Re-Future (University of the Free State’s Centre for Development Studies, Qala Phelang Tala, the Programme for innovation i

National Development Plan – vision for 2030 (NDP 2030)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
National Planning Commission, Presidency of the Government of South Africa
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The NDP is a long-term strategic plan, and serves four broad objectives: • Providing overarching goals for what SA wants to achieve by 2030. • Building consensus on the key obstacles to achieving these goals and what needs to be done to overcome those obstacles. • Providing a shared long-term strategic framework within which more detailed planning can take place in order to advance the long-term goals set out in the NDP. • Creating a basis for making choices about how best to use limited resources. The aim is to ensure policy coherence, alignment and coordination across government’s plans, including the alignment of budgeting processes. It identifies indicators and targets from the NDP and other plans, such as: - The New Growth path, which sets the trajectory of economic development. - National Infrastructure Plan which guides the rollout of infrastructure to improve people’s lives and enable economic growth. - Industrial Policy Action Plan, which focuses on promoting investment and competitiveness in leading sectors and industries. - It is structured around 14 priority outcomes: education, health, safety and security, economic growth and employment, skills development, infrastructure, rural development, human settlements, local government, environment, international relations, an effective public sector, social protection, nation ‐ building and social cohesion.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The NDP is quite clear about the expected results of implementing the plan: In 2030, South Africans will be more conscious of the things they have in common than their differences. Their lived experiences will progressively undermine and cut across the divisions of race, gender, disability, space and class. The nation will be more accepting of peoples’ multiple identities. In this South Africa there will be: - Broad-based knowledge about and support for a set of values shared by all South Africans including the values contained in the Constitution. - An inclusive society and economy. This means tackling the factors that sustain inequality of opportunity and outcomes by building capabilities, removing participating barriers and redressing the wrongs of the past. - Increased interaction between South Africans from different social and racial groups. - Strong leadership across society and a mobilised, active and responsible citizenry. This Medium Term Strategic Framework period will be characterised by universal knowledge of the Constitution and the values enshrined therein. Improved access to quality public services will greatly reduce inequality of opportunity. Instruments to optimise redress will be in place and government across the three spheres will be more responsive and thus ignite a citizenry positively engaged and active in their own development.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
No, there has been no evaluation of the work of the NDP but Operation Phakisa is one of the mechanisms for implementing the NDP (Means ‘hurry up’ in Sesotho). It sets plans and targets, monitors progress and makes results public. It is a methodology tool “Big Fast Results” utilised by other government including the government of Malaysia. The Operation Phakisa website states: “Operation Phakisa is a cross-sector programme where various stakeholders engage to implement initiatives and concrete actions to address constraints to delivery in a prioritised focused area for public accountability and transparency” (www.operationphakisa.gov.za).

City of Cape Town Cultural Policy

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
City of Cape Town - Local government
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The purpose of the policy is, broadly, to: • Create mechanisms to guide the allocation of resources i.e. human, financial, City services, and property towards the support of arts, culture and the creative industries in Cape Town. • Create mechanisms for internal transversal coordination between various City departments that provide services related to arts, culture and the creative industries. • Provide mechanisms for the development of an enabling environment that fosters partnership building with stakeholders outside of the city. • Make a case for, and facilitate increased investment by the City and other potential funders in arts, culture and the creative industries in Cape Town.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The policy is intended to benefit Cape Town’s population as a whole, as well as local sectoral stakeholders. The policy was submitted to a public participation process and was advertised in local newspapers, libraries and on the City’s website for comment and recommendation from interested parties. After a period of 30 days this feedback was collated and adjustments were made to the Policy where appropriate. The following are achievements associated with this policy - Award of creative cities - Public arts management framework
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
- UNESCO Creative cities award was seen as a major achievement as Cape Town was the first city in Africa to be named a UNESCO City of Design. Cape Town City joins 180 cities in 72 countries committed to the promotion and development of innovation and creativity. The Design Indaba team commented on this achievement that ‘Cape Town has many challenges but with that comes opportunities to bridge the divide while using creativity as a tool to create a better world”. - The city was used as a case study for design thinking process as part of the Cape Town Design Capital programme. - Part of World Cultures Forum although this focused more on cultural tourism.

Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE): Cultural Events

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The purpose of MGE is to make strategic investments to optimize the economic benefit of the arts in South Africa. By improving investment in key areas of the creative economy, it is anticipated that job creation and productivity will be enhanced and the sector’s global competitiveness will be increased. Cultural Events is one of the work streams in the key MGE area titled ‘Audience development and consumption’. The cultural events work stream supports large and small-scale local, regional and national events that promote the arts, culture and heritage and that contribute to local economic development, job creation and the development of audiences. The specific objectives of the work stream are to: − To upscale existing events and festivals allowing increased diversity of cultural offerings, enhanced quality of productions, and the extension of event timeframes. − To support projects with obvious economic and social benefit for the location. − To increase the audience and exposure that each production receives. − To increase the number of jobs created, livelihoods supported and income generated through the events. − To enhance the social cohesion in the country by promoting diversity of content and audiences in specific locations of the project. − To enhance skills development opportunities of Creative and Cultural industries practitioners.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In implementing key programmes it is anticipated that the overall impact of the programme on the creative economy will be: • Positioning the arts as a valuable contributor to economic growth and job creation. • Stimulating economic development. • Creating linkages with creative industries across the African continent as well as internationally to seek exchanges and enrich South African arts, culture and heritage practitioners and businesses. • Promote sustainability across the arts, Culture and Heritage sector. • Raising the profile of South Africa as a destination for cultural consumers and increasing tourism (visitor) volume and spend. • Building the professional capacity of the sector. • Improving the production and dissemination of local content.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
• While many of the organisers (especially Flagships and Festivals and Events) are established and have been involved in organising events for long periods, the DAC MGE programme has also assisted new organisers in the cultural event/ activity arena who have been planning the event for three years or less. This suggests that the DAC MGE is creating opportunities for more cultural events/ activities to be held in South Africa, contributing to the objective of increasing and diversifying cultural offerings. • Different types of cultural genres and aspects including established events, festivals, exhibitions, performances, workshops and training events (mainly targeting youth and schools) are being supported by DAC MGE funding. The different types, sizes and spatial/ geographical spread of the Festivals and Events is meeting the broader objective of contributing to increased diversity of cultural offerings. It is important to note that in terms of spatial distribution of the events/ activities, Gauteng was dominant with close to a third of the events/ activities surveyed located in this province. • In terms of employment, more established events and Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) generally employed more persons permanently. In total, organisations that received MGE funding during the three-year study period employ 3 388 people in permanent jobs. Furthermore, DAC MGE funded event organisers employ a total of 25 941 additional persons specifically for the events, 1 473 permanent persons and 24 558 temporary workers per year. This aligns to the DAC MGE objective of promoting job creation and upskilling opportunities. The DAC MGE funded events are often one of the main activities or the only activity the organisations are involved in. This underscores the importance of DAC MGE funding in promoting and supporting the diversity of cultural events/ activities in South Africa. However, there was a lack of disaggregated employment information (by gender, historical racial category and location of additional persons employed) both in the information provided in the close out templates for reporting as well as information that respondents could provide during the interviews. The available results do suggest that employment was generally locally based, that both women and men are being exposed to job opportunities in the cultural sector, and that black Africans are key beneficiaries, as the DAC MGE programme intended. However, most of the employment is temporary/ casual and are generally lower paying jobs.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Cultural and creative professionals
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Goal 4 - Promote Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Gender Equality

Ministries, governmental agencies and/or parliamentary bodies in charge of gender equality: 
Exist but are not relevant for artists and cultural professionals
Policies and measures to support the full participation of women in cultural life have been implemented during the last 4 years: 
NO
Policies and measures have been adopted to support the recognition and advancement of women as artists, cultural professionals and/or creative entrepreneurs, (e.g. ensure equal pay for equal work or equal access to funding, coaching or mentoring schemes, anti-discrimination measures, etc.): 
NO
Data is regularly collected and disseminated to monitor: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Yanaya Gender Film and Dialogue Festival

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Yanaya Productions (Pty) Ltd
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The key objective of the Yanaya Gender Film and Dialogue Festival is to provide a platform for women to showcase their films and participate in dialogues on a number of societal issues that impact on women. These include violence against women and children, silencing of women and challenges that women and children face in their everyday lives
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Audience development for films made by women and those that address and document the daily experiences and struggles of women at local and international level. The festival seeks to facilitate collaboration of advocacy and activism efforts for women in communities in which the festivals take place. The films also encourage a dialogue amongst communities who have watched films and create platforms to engage not only with the film itself but also the messages and themes that are told by the filmmakers.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Sisters Working in Film and Television (SWIFT)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Sisters Working in Film and Television
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
They play an advocacy and activism role and are consistently seeking partnerships with key stakeholders in government, industry and private sector to support their very important mandate. One of their objectives is to conduct research on the working conditions and labour practices and how these impact on women. SWIFT is a member driven organization with a local focus and international membership.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Improved working conditions for women in the film and television industry: safety, equitable pay and awareness and respect for women on film and television sets.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Female Filmmaker Project

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
National Film and Video Foundation
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Female Filmmaker Project is an initiative that was first introduced by the NFVF in 2014. In line with its objective to develop and promote the South African film and audiovisual industry, the NFVF introduced this initiative to bridge the gap in a male dominated film industry in South Africa. The opportunity to work with an experienced female owned company is sensitive with the often exploitative and gender insensitive environment for women that is beset with sexual harassment, unequal pay and long working hours on shoot days that do not cater for the safety and security, remuneration and flexible working conditions for women. The 3-year funding grant takes away the stress and anxiety associated with raising production finance from different sources. The burden to comply with mandatory requirements (including but not limited to financials, tax clearance certificates etc) is often taxing for newly established production companies by recent graduates who are navigating the business environment and the regulatory landscapes. The production of diverse new content attracts distribution deals mainly from the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), the only public broadcasting service provider in South Africa. Such a distribution deal for all short films is important to ensure that these films are seen by as many South Africans as possible and opens up possibilities for other forms of distribution such as video on demand and niche channels.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The deliverable of the projects are 26 short films, 24 minutes each with an individual production budget of R500 000. The project was implemented across three financial years from April 2014 ending March 2017. Six projects were delivered in the first years followed by 10 short films for each remaining year of the agreement. At the end of the project, first time filmmakers have skills and experience to write, direct and produce short films and a calling card and projects that will go into their film reel. By providing a platform for women to work with each other, young and inexperienced filmmakers work with experienced women in the writing, directing, production and post-production aspects of their films. This opportunity enables women to be heard and to produce films where their voices and narratives are true to their expressions.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Vavasati International Women’s Festival

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
South African State Theatre
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The main objectives are: • To offer women in the arts, young and old, a platform to tell their stories and to showcase their work to an international audience. • To give accessibility, technical staff, equipment, space and resources to women who are often excluded from the mainstream industry. • To celebrate women who do not appear in history books. • To create space for dialogue that includes men.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
• Opportunity to showcase artwork to an international audience. • Access by external theatre-makers, artists and producers to the State Theatre’s existing audiences and networks. • An opportunity for women to take on leadership positions in various departments including directing, programming, etc. • Introduction, promotion and celebration of new narratives. • It is expected that the festival will contribute to the revitalization of the inner city and to attract visitors from across Gauteng.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Artistic Freedom

The constitution and/or national regulatory frameworks formally acknowledge: 
The right of artists to create without censorship or intimidation
The right of artists to disseminate and/or perform their artistic works
The right for all citizens to freely enjoy artistic works both in public and in private
The right for all citizens to take part in cultural life without restrictions
Independent bodies are established to receive complaints and/or monitor violations and restrictions to artistic freedom: 
YES
Initiatives to protect artists at risk or in exile have been developed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years (e.g. providing safe houses, guidance and training, etc.): 
NO
Measures and initiatives intended to ensure transparent decision-making on government funding/ state grants and awards for artists exist (e.g. through independent committees, etc.): 
YES
Social protection measures that take the professional status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. health insurance, retirement schemes, unemployment benefits, etc.): 
NO
Economic measures that take the status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. collective agreements, income tax and other regulatory frameworks, etc.): 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Unmute Dance Company

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Unmute Dance Company
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Performing Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Unmute Dance Company seeks to inspire the inclusion of people with disabilities within society through performances, artistic workshops and exchange programmes that encourage activism and awareness of integration. Unmute Dance Company is an integrated company of artists with mixed abilities or ‘disabilities’ whose vision is to inspire the inclusion of ‘disabled’ persons into the main stream society through cutting edge and original performances, workshops and exchange programmes etc. Unmute Dance Company is the only existing integrated dance company in South Africa, based in Cape Town as part of the Artscape Resource Centre Incubator programme. With its cutting edge works it has been invited to be part of South Africa’s major arts festivals like Johannesburg Dance Umbrella Festival, Cape Town’s Infecting The City, Gipca’s Live Art Festival, etc. The company continues to reach to schools and communities through outreach performances and workshops that promotes integration.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Company seeks to challenge people’s state of mental-misconception on disabilities, by encouraging people to break barriers and realize that persons with disabilities are able and have their own abilities and that no one is confined by physical limitations.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Artscape Theatre
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Measures and Initiatives reported by Civil Society Organizations

Describe how the CSO form has been used to promote collaboration with CSOs in the preparation of this report, including the distribution of the form and the modalities of collection and analysis of the information received. Please indicate the percentage of measures and initiatives received that have been considered as relevant by the Party and included in the QPR.: 
Representatives from civil society organizations who attended the training workshop and the validation meeting (see General Information) assisted with providing input and guidance on the selection of measures included in the report. In addition, ASSITEJ SA and Arterial Network SA compiled the Civil Society report.
GOAL 1 - Support sustainable systems of governance for culture: 

#Artout events

Name of CSO(s) responsible for the implementation of the measure/initiative: 
Arterial Network South Africa
Cultural domains covered by the measure/initiative: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the measure/initiative: 
Arterial Network produced a number of events, which promotes the objectives of the 2005 Convention. These events included the following: - Hosted a group of festival directors, programmers and curators during the National Arts festival in 2017 to converse over the opportunities and challenges associated with the mobility of artists in the SADC region. - Hosted a roundtable in Durban (2017) to discuss the revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage as an opportunity to create community lobbying and advocacy concerns.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does this measure/initiative receive or has it received International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) funding?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the measure/initiative?: 
- Inclusion of Civil Society in the governance of cultural policy - Promote the objectives of the 2005 Convention. - Contribute to transparancy and accountability in the governance of Culture

Workshops hosted on "Network and Advocacy" and "project Management"

Name of CSO(s) responsible for the implementation of the measure/initiative: 
Arterial Network
Cultural domains covered by the measure/initiative: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Performing Arts
Publishing
Visual Arts
Describe the main features of the measure/initiative: 
Arterial Network hosted a series of workshops. The workshop held on "Project management toolkit" was to reflect on the state of arts and advocacy in the City of Cape Town where the workshop was hosted. This led to further presentations being made to City representatives to address collective concerns raised. The workshop on "networking and advocacy" was aimed at developing capacity in order to achieve stronger accountability and transparency in cultural programmes.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does this measure/initiative receive or has it received International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) funding?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the measure/initiative?: 
Contribute to the achievement of greater transparency and accountability in the governance of culture.
GOAL 2 - Achieve a balanced flow of cultural goods and services and increase the mobility of artists and cultural professionals: 

Cradle of Creativity

Name of CSO(s) responsible for the implementation of the measure/initiative: 
ASSITEJ SA
Cultural domains covered by the measure/initiative: 
Performing Arts
Describe the main features of the measure/initiative: 
Cradle of Creativity supports programmes of activities, building inter-continental and intercultural collaborations to ensure that the field of theatre for young audiences as a whole grows in diversity, creativity and audience appeal across the continent. Given that approximately 43% of the population on the African continent are under the age of 15, the future of theatre in Africa IS theatre for young audiences.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does this measure/initiative receive or has it received International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) funding?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the measure/initiative?: 
Promotion of theatre for young audiences on the African continent. • Increase in touring opportunities for SA and international artists & productions. • Stimulation of an ongoing, dynamic relationship between teachers and theatre makers, with educational materials linked to curricula. • Development of an enabling environment for youth organisations & youth development, particularly in the most disadvantaged communities. • Strengthening of local & international partnerships for continued collaboration.
GOAL 3 - Integrate culture in sustainable development frameworks: 
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GOAL 4 - Promote human rights and fundamental freedoms: 
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On the basis of the analysis of the responses provided through the CSO form, present up to ten main priorities of CSOs to implement the Convention over the next four years.: 
Activity 1: ASSITEJ SA will be working on a 6 year cyclical programme which invests in the development of new work for young audiences from across Africa (Year 1), and which presents a showcase of SA, African and international theatre for young audiences work (Year 2) in an international festival to be called Cradle of Creativity, based on the success of the 2017 event. This event will take place in a different part of SA every two years, thereby stimulating different artists and audiences. One of its main focus areas is to increase the visibility of African artists and diverse forms of cultural expression for young audiences on the global stage. This will also serve as a space in which to nurture intercultural sharing, learning and exchange. Activity 2: The Pan African Creative Exchange (PACE) – a project of the Vrystaat Arts Festival supported by the University of the Free State and the Mellon Foundation – will project African artists onto the global stage through a showcase opportunity. All art forms will be encouraged, and the status of First Nation (particularly Khoi and San) artists is of particular concern. Other connected initiatives include Free State Arts and Health (FSAH), Programme for Innovation in Artform Development (PIAD), pubic art projects (PAP and Vryfees), and the Vrystaat Literature Festival. Together they aim to ensure sustainable growth for the creative industries in our region and Southern Africa. As an Afrikaans language festival, they nevertheless have a vision of ‘One festival, many stories,’ and their mission is to support the development and presentation of great art in the Free State for all - including in Sesotho and English.

Emerging Transversal Issues

Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Youth Filmmaker Project

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
National Film and Video Foundation
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cinema/ Audiovisual Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Youth Filmmaker Project is an initiative to unearth new talent and voices by providing them with a calling card into the film industry under the guidance and mentorship of an experienced production team. The project is implemented over 3 years from the development of a script, production, post-production and distribution of films across varying platforms for such films. These include public broadcasters, the local and international film festival circuit as well as film competitions in and outside South Africa.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
All participating filmmakers must be able to write, direct and produce a short film. The appointed production company must have assisted youth filmmakers to produce short films on their own with support from mentors. The production company must execute and deliver a total of 10 short films of 24 minutes in length over the period of 3 years. Films must be distributed on television and entered into film festival competitions locally and internationally to build the profile of the filmmakers.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Natives At Large
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

Artists in Schools (AiS)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
This initiative is a direct response to the lack of quality arts and culture educators and comprehensive education in the majority of the public schools in the country. While many self-employed arts practitioners have committed themselves to sharing their skills and knowledge in their communities, the potential role of Artists in School (AiS) is often not effectively realised due to skills gaps on the part of artists and educators, and a lack of awareness of their potential role and value on the part of schools.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
● The training programme (workshops) for the arts practitioners consists of interrelated modules or topics focusing on personal and professional skills, project planning and implementation, arts and culture education theory and methodologies, interpretation, and implementation of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), an amendment to the 2005 National Curriculum Statement, came into being in 2012. ● Creation of sustainable job opportunities for community arts practitioners who are unemployed but have been volunteering their skills with various schools in their immediate communities. For the first time in South Africa, the participating arts practitioners are being remunerated for the services rendered in the participating school. ● It is envisaged that the work of the AiS project all throughout the academic year with the educators and learners should culminate into a Regional or Provincial arts exhibition and concert. This event, resources allowing, should be taken through all the regions of the respective provinces. Budget allowing, the national AiS exhibition will take place at a central venue to be identified by the key role players. The purpose of this endeavour will be to expose the disadvantaged communities to the arts, particularly exhibitions and semi-professional musical, dance and drama performances in the context of the development of audiences for the cultural products and programme in those provinces and at national level. The placement of the arts practitioners in the schools is generally preceded by the intensive capacity building workshops on the methodology and the relevant policy imperatives such as the CAPS. During the workshops, relevant officials from the provincial and district offices of Department of Basic Education, mainly the arts and culture subject advisors are called in to make presentations on the challenges of the implementation of the curriculum as well as all the relevant policy prescripts in the classroom.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Sibikwa Arts Centre
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Nyanga Arts Development Centre
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Theatre4Youth (ASSITEJ South Africa)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
ASSITEJ South Africa
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Performing Arts
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The measure responds to the need that exists in South Africa for children and youth to have access to the arts, and recognizes the value of the arts as an important component of education and personal development. While the educational curriculum expects children to have access to professional theatre and other art forms as a compulsory element of creative arts, this goal is far from being realised for the majority of children and young people in SA. Theatre4Youth was devised as a mechanism to bring the relevant stakeholders together in striving to grow the industry, eradicating obstacles that prevent theatre from touring to schools and creating more opportunities for artists and audiences by actively engaging with education. The programme aimed to build greater stability for theatre companies, and to motivate teachers and learners through exposure to high quality, transformational theatre experiences. Key objectives therefore are: ● to increase access to the theatre for young audiences for children and youth in schools through developing strategies to foster collaborations between theatre practitioners and educators, ● to develop an interactive online tool “Theatre4Youth” which allows for increasing interaction between artists and schools, ● to develop and support theatre companies to increase the economic viability and quality of their output and in so doing tour productions in diverse languages to rural, inner city and peri-urban areas, and ● to raise awareness of the value of arts for children and young people through communicating about this programme and through the related “Take a Child to the Theatre Today” campaign.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
YES
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
• Making arts and culture accessible to all children and young people, regardless of language, economic standing or cultural background. • Creating mechanisms for ensuring that more children and young people have access to appropriate professional theatre in their own language/s in their schools, crèches of community spaces. • Strengthening the theatre sector to be more sustainable by supporting artists to make and tour work for children and young people to these audiences. • Creating relationships between professional theatre makers and educational facilities, which will be the basis for more development in the future. • Increasing public awareness of the value of the arts for children and young people, particularly amongst the educational sector, as well as more broadly.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Challenges and Achievements

Describe the main results achieved to implement the Convention (at least one major achievement in one of the four goals): 
The achievements noted below are not necessarily in response to the 2005 Convention, but are significant in the context of the country’s cultural ecosystem and are aligned to the 2005 Convention. - Consultation on the White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage has been concluded and adopted by Parliament. The White paper looks at how cultural policy will impact on the work of other government departments and vice versa and intends to assist with coordination across multiple areas from education, to trade and industry, small business, tourism, labour and social development. - SA has a network of functioning public cultural assets in the public sector at national, provincial and local government levels in support of the cultural ecosystem. These assets range from theatres, galleries, museums, and community art centres. While regional equity has not yet been achieved, this cultural infrastructure goes some way to ensuring equitable access to cultural resources in the country. - The system of arts funding for projects and bursaries (under- and postgraduate studies) has sustained many arts organizations across the cultural value chain with a solid foundation provided by organizations in the public and private sector. These organizations include the National Arts Council, the National Film and Video Foundation, Business and Arts South Africa, the National Lotteries Commission, the Department of Arts and Culture generally and through the Mzansi Golden Economy programme, the Arts and Culture Trust, the provincial Arts and Culture Councils and local government. In addition foreign cultural agencies like Pro Helvetia, British Council, Goethe and IFAS support programmes across the cultural and creative industries, in partnership with local partners. - The South African Cultural Observatory completed a review of the best practices, methods and approaches to mapping studies, a fundamental research area for the SACO. The results of this process are summarised in the report: “South African Cultural and Creative Industries Mapping Study: Review of Methods and the Way Forward”. In addition to this three mapping studies were completed focused on these sectors: Performance & Celebration; Visual Arts & Crafts; Design & Creative Services. The SACO also developed a “Framework for the Monitoring and Evaluation of Publicly Funded Arts, Culture and Heritage”, which it has been disseminating via its online channels, to stakeholders and which provides practitioners with a framework through which to analyse the impact of sector interventions. Finally, the SACO developed both a Statistical Framework and a Forecasting Model during the 2015/16 financial year. - The customised sector programmes developed by the DTI for film and craft ensured that funds were allocated by the Department of Trade and Industry through various incentive schemes. This alignment to the Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP 5) and demonstrates a commitment from government to a series of structured, measured and coherent interventions in support of the cultural and creative industries. - The independent arts and culture sector is vibrant and resilient with many cutting edge programmes emanating from the sector itself as this QPR demonstrates. - National legislation related to human rights and fundamental freedoms are implemented and promote artistic freedom.
Describe the main challenges encountered to implement the Convention and the main solutions found or envisaged to overcome them: 
- Regional equity in cultural resources remains a critical problem for the sector. - While transformation and redress have been key objectives since 1994, some sectors such as the SA film and television industry post democracy remain largely male dominated with very little room especially for women to own means of production, produce content and occupy leadership positions in the content industries. - Despite the growth of funds available to support the arts and culture sector (including the DAC, the DTI, the National Lottery and business sponsorship), many arts and culture organisations remain under-resourced, under-funded and lacking in capacity. - Achieving the integration of culture in sustainable development programmes and projects has not yet been met with minimal engagement with environmental factors facing the cultural value chain. - There is fragmentation and a lack of coordination across arts and culture industry organizations as most industry associations are voluntary with little resources for activities like stakeholder engagement and advocacy and lobbying. This has resulted in limited participation by civil society with the 2005 Convention. - Monitoring and evaluation are not well integrated into programmes and projects. - Ongoing collection of statistics and data related to the cultural sector is in its infancy and is not yet comprehensive across all cultural domains. - There is currently inadequate protection or national legislation for the social and economic rights of artists. - Access to the Internet is not universal (few free Wi-Fi spaces and relatively costly) with a digital divide between urban and rural communities. - There are insufficient policies and measures to support the international flow of cultural goods and services.
Describe the steps planned in the next four years to further implement the Convention and the priority areas identified for future policy action based on the conclusions of the current reporting process: 
- Implement the Revised 1996 White Paper on Arts and Culture. - The Copyright Act (1978) is under review and the Copyright Amendment Bill is with Parliament for consideration and public consultation. The Bill is being lead by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition. - The Performers Protection Act (1967) is under review and the Performers Protection Amendment Bill is undergoing revision with the Copyright Amendment Bill. - Develop a programme of activities to raise awareness about the 2005 Convention, led by the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC). - Establish a mechanism for ongoing dialogue with civil society about the 2005 Convention and its implementation. - Develop a mechanism (template and ongoing engagements) for government departments, provinces, cities, DSAC entities, arts and culture organisations and representative bodies for reporting on policies and measures being implemented in line with the 2005 Convention for the next QPR. - Develop a user-friendly booklet for the sector outlining roles and responsibilities, as well as benefits of the 2005 Convention. - Strengthen linkages between international and domestic obligations in relation to the 2005 Convention for the benefit of the sector. - Establish a regular and structured forum with civil society and government departments for purposes of deepening the understanding of the 2005 Convention and South Africa’s obligation as a signatory.

Annexes

Please upload relevant documents (law, policy, agreement, regulation, strategy, etc.), studies and statistics in PDF format related to the implementation of the 4 goals and the 11 areas of monitoring of the Convention in your country. The documents should have been produced during the reporting period covered by this periodic report. Please provide the title and a description of the main content of the document in English or French.: 

Submission

Designated official signing the report: 
Title: 
Ms.
First name: 
Mandisa
Family name: 
Tshikwatamba
Organization: 
Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
Position: 
Deputy Director-General (Corporate Services)
Date of submission: 
2022
Electronic Signature: 
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