Canada 2016 report

Policies and Measures
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
Creative Saskatchewan Regional institutional
Quebec: Quebec's Digital Cultural Plan Local, Regional, National financial, institutional
The CRTC’s review of its television policies to facilitate the transition to an increasingly on-demand environment National regulatory
Canada Book Fund (CBF) National financial
The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) National regulatory
Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) National financial
Eye on Canada National institutional
Canada Media Fund (CMF) National financial
The Ontario Music Fund (OMF) Regional financial
Nova Scotia Status of the Artist Act Regional legislative
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction International regulatory
Quebec: Cooperation initiatives led by Quebec within international organizations International financial
The Canada Media Fund’s support for international digital media coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction International financial
Facilitating the temporary entry/work of foreign artists in Canada International regulatory
National Film Board’s digital distribution partnership with China’s Phoenix New Media Limited International institutional
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
Caribbean Cluster Initiative for Animation Outsourcing and Intellectual Property Development International financial
Quebec: Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec agreements under the UNESCO- Aschberg program Regional, International financial, institutional
Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International International financial
Dance Presentation Program: Support to Presenters International financial
Visiting Foreign Artists Program International financial
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
Tremplin NIKANIK program to assist First Nations francophone filmmakers Regional financial
National Forum on Literary Arts National institutional
The Year of the North Regional institutional
Culturat Regional institutional
Canada Cultural Spaces Fund National financial
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
Quebec: Agenda 21 for Culture for Quebec: international component International financial
CARICOM Education for Employment Program (C-EFE) International institutional
EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
Canada Council for the Arts’ Deaf and disability arts strategy: Expanding the Arts 2012 National institutional
CBC/Radio-Canada: National public broadcasting in the digital age National institutional
Quebec: Digital technologies Local, Regional, National, International financial, institutional
CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
Quebec: 2.6.1 2011-2015 Government Action Plan on Gender Equality Local, Regional, National regulatory
Commitment from the National Film Board of Canada that 50 percent of its production budget will go to films directed by women National regulatory, institutional
YOUTH
Name of the measure Scope of the measure Nature
New Brunswick Artist-in-Residency Program for Schools Local financial
Alberta’s Future Leaders Program Local financial
BC Creative Futures Strategy: Creative Youth Initiatives Regional financial
Quebec: Youth - Education and Culture Regional, International financial, institutional
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Launched in 2013, the Ontario Music Fund (OMF) was the first comprehensive business development program to support all segments of the Ontario music industry, including live presenters. The key objective of the OMF is to strengthen and stimulate growth in Ontario’s music companies and support the province’s growing music sector. The Fund is designed to drive activity and investment and to support Ontario’s music companies and organizations in expanding their economic and cultural footprints within Canada and around the world. The OMF replaced the former Music Fund and Export Fund of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.

The goals of the OMF are to:

  • Increase music production activity in Ontario;
  • Strengthen and develop the support structures and systems that contribute to economic and cultural growth;
  • Increase opportunities for new/emerging Canadian artists;
  • Create opportunities for emerging artists/small music companies; and
  • Support Ontario’s musical diversity, particularly with respect to music from culturally diverse, Aboriginal and Franco-Ontarian communities.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF) aims to address investment gaps at key phases of company and industry development cycles. It provides matching financial support through four program streams to music companies (record labels, music publishers, music managers, artist entrepreneurs, music promoters, music presenters, and booking agents), and to music industry trade, service, event and training organizations. The Fund is structured to address the entire value chain of the music sector and to complement other support programs. Extensive consultations and partnerships with industry trade organizations were carried out in developing the program.

The four streams are: Music Industry Development, Music Company Development, Live Music, and Music Futures.

- The Music Industry Development stream is designed to strengthen and develop the support structures and systems that contribute to economic and cultural growth of the music industry in Ontario by supporting organizations engaging in strategic initiatives with long-term impacts on the growth and sustainability of Ontario’s music industry.

- The Music Company Development stream is intended to provide Ontario-based music companies with funding to support new or expanded business activities, including strategic business and market development, in the form of investments and undertakings.

- The Live Music stream is intended to increase the number and quality of live music experiences enjoyed by residents of and visitors to Ontario at events, festivals and concerts featuring Canadian artists.

- The Music Futures stream specifically creates opportunities for emerging artists and music businesses in Francophone, Aboriginal, and ethnocultural communities, as well as in under-represented musical genres.

For more information, please see:  http://www.omdc.on.ca/music/the_ontario_music_fund.htm

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF) is intended to help the Ontario music industry grow and expand in Canada and across the world. Expected results include an increase in music production activity, company revenues, and market share in Ontario, stronger support structures, increased opportunities for new and emerging Canadian artists and small music companies, as well as greater support of Aboriginal, ethnocultural, and Franco-Ontarian music communities. An increase in tourism attributed to live music performances is also expected.

The OMF is also advancing the Ontario government’s Live Music Strategy by providing support for live performances and touring opportunities, helping to grow audiences – both in Ontario and abroad – for Canadian music developed in Ontario.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Government of Ontario
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Announced in the 2013 Ontario Budget as a three-year, $45 million grant program, the Ontario Music Fund (OMF) was made permanent in the 2015 Ontario Budget at $15 million annually. For the year 2014, transfer payments made by the OMF were detailed at $14,004,000 CAD.

To date, the OMF has provided approximately $42.2 million to Ontario’s music industry.

Source: http://www.omdc.on.ca/Assets/Communications/Annual+Report/Annual+Report+2013-14_en.pdf

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Since the program was launched in 2013, three evaluation processes have been undertaken to review aspects of its operation:

  1. The program was reviewed from an operational point of view by the delivery agency, the Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC), as part of its regular cycle of program reviews. A third-party consultant was engaged to carry out review activities, which involved a limited level of stakeholder consultations.
  2. In 2016, the program was reviewed for compliance with internal Ontario government accountability directives by an internal audit team. This review focused on administrative effectiveness and compliances with rules for transfer payments.
  3. The ministry and the OMDC evaluated program rules and guidelines in 2015-16 as part of efforts to enhance effectiveness and return on investment, following the government’s decision in 2015 to extend the program beyond its initial three-year run. Stakeholders and industry trade associations were consulted as part of this process.

The program was found to be meeting its goals of stimulating expanded recording and performing activity in Ontario, but opportunities were found to sharpen results reporting and tracking of the return on investment.

The first and third evaluations included direct stakeholders and participants in the program (music companies and organizations through the province).

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The evaluations, in part, examined indicators such as:

  • The increase in the number of recordings released by Ontario companies (including both Canadian and foreign artists)
  • The increase in the number of live music performance opportunities presented, and total attendance (audience) for the events
  • The increase in overall revenues for participating companies, and, by proxy, market share
  • The increase in the business capacity of the participating independent companies, measured by full time employees, cash flow and probability
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Nova Scotia Status of the Artist Act

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

In 2012, the Government of Nova Scotia passed the Status of the Artist Act as a part of the implementation of the 2011 Arts and Culture 5-Point Plan. While not an official culture strategy, the 5-Point Plan set out the government’s priorities for supporting the development of the arts and culture sector for the following several years, which included developing and introducing Status of the Artist legislation.

The Act helps to define the role of artists and investment in supporting and fostering artistic activity in Nova Scotia. The legislation allows artists to set pay for work and services, outlines the government's roles and responsibilities toward artists, and helps ensure that Nova Scotians have access to artistic training and education. Another objective is to promote fair treatment for artists and enhance their contributions to making life better for families through Nova Scotia's creative economy.

For more information about the Act, please see: http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20120330002

For more information about the 5-Point Plan, please see: http://cch.novascotia.ca/sites/default/files/inline/documents/fivepointplan.pdf

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
legislative
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The province developed the legislation with input from the Creative Nova Scotia Leadership Council, which advises government on arts and culture policy, based on legislation and best practices in other jurisdictions. The Council is made up of representatives from the arts and culture sector.

The legislation:

  • Allows artists' associations to set levels of pay for works created and services rendered;
  • Encourages fair treatment of artists by government and outline government's roles and responsibilities to artists;
  • Continues to ensure all Nova Scotians have access to artistic training and education;
  • Acknowledges the working conditions of artists;
  • Affirms government's commitment to the rights of artists, for example, safe working conditions and freedom of expression and association; and
  • Ensures government has the necessary tools to support Nova Scotia's artists and their unique needs.

For more information, please see: http://nslegislature.ca/legc/bills/61st_4th/1st_read/b001.htm

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

As stated under the Act (article 2 – Purpose), the results expected through its implementation are the following: 

- the role of the artist in building the Province's identity and culture and the enhancement that art brings to the Province's social and economic well-being will be acknowledged;

- the terms by which Nova Scotians define who is a professional artist will be identified;

- the unique working conditions of the Province's professional artists will be acknowledged, as well as their right to:

  • freedom of expression and association;
  • have associations representing artists to be recognized in law and to promote their professional and socio-economic interests; and
  • have access to advisory forums in which artists may express their views on their status and any other questions concerning them.

Two areas in which the Status of the Artist legislation has had direct impact on the working conditions of professional artists in Nova Scotia are the positive consequences emerging from a clear definition of “Professional Artist” and the acknowledgement of their associated rights.

The Status of the Artist Act defines a “Professional Artist” and Arts Nova Scotia is able to use this legal definition in the eligibility criteria for its funding programs. The definition also has an impact beyond funding eligibility and extends into the area of labour standards.

Professional artists are considered to be “self-employed.” While this designation provides some benefits such as autonomy and freedom in the exercise of their work and allows them to claim work related expenses for taxation purposes, artists had no historical right to self-organize and bargain collectively. Many artistic disciplines organized themselves into associations, but until federal Status of the Artist legislation emerged, the impact of such self-organization across Canada was limited.  Nova Scotia’s Status of the Artist legislation allows for self-organization and collective bargaining in areas that are under provincial jurisdiction.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Government of Nova Scotia
The Creative Nova Scotia Leadership Council
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

No direct financial resources were associated with the implementation of the Status of the Artist Act itself. However, this new act defining “Professional Artist” was designed and established concurrently with legislation that created Arts Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia’s agency responsible for delivering approximately $3.4 million in support of the province’s professional artists and arts organizations.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Creative Saskatchewan

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan was established as a crown agency of the Government of Saskatchewan in July of 2013. The agency was created in recognition of the integral role that creative industries play in a vibrant Saskatchewan. 

Creative Saskatchewan stimulates the commercialization of creative products and helps Saskatchewan’s creative talent find firmer footing in domestic and international markets. The agency accomplishes this through a suite of grants, mentoring opportunities, marketing activities, and strong partnerships with creative industry associations. 

Since its establishment, the agency has been operating a variety of grants to support creative industry production, marketing and export. These grants have already made a major impact on Saskatchewan’s creative industries through investment and partnership building with creative industry associations. These partnerships strengthen the creative sector development plan and the agency’s aim to positively affect the gross domestic product (GDP) of the Province of Saskatchewan. Recent data from the Statistics Canada Culture Satellite Account shows that in 2014 Saskatchewan’s cultural GDP grew 3.3%, following a gain of 1.1% in 2013.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan is a provincial crown agency which works with the creative industries of the province. It is responsible for six sectors: music, screen based media, visual arts and fine craft, book publishing, live performing arts, and digital media. Below is a summary of Creative Saskatchewan’s nine funding programs and their intended impact on Saskatchewan’s cultural talent.

  1. Business Capacity – development of professional capacity and skills;
  2. Research - industry-based projects and market intelligence;
  3. Creative Industries Production - production and product refinement;
  4. Market and Export Development - for individuals/businesses and sector organizations;
  5. Market Travel - financial support toward awards, showcases, presentations, etc.;
  6. Sound Recording - production of commercially-viable music products;
  7. Screen-based Media Content Development - early phase projects;
  8. Screen-based Media Production - requiring a 30 per cent Saskatchewan spend; and
  9. Performing Arts Tour Support - must demonstrate commercial viability and have already lined up at least six performance dates.

Creative Saskatchewan is accountable for ensuring that program funds and association supports are dispersed equitably and effectively. To that end, grant applications for most programs are vetted through a peer review jury system. Juries are comprised of respected individuals from industry sectors suggested by the creative industry associations.

For more information, please see: http://www.creativesask.ca/

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Creative Saskatchewan is driven to achieve a future where Saskatchewan's creative producers continue to realize diverse commercial opportunities in national, international and emerging markets which collectively grow thriving, sustainable creative industries. Examples of projects funded include:

Craft

Adam Finn received $18,810 through the Creative Industries Production Grant to produce handcrafted leather footwear with the goal of expanding his business, Last Shoes, into larger markets.

Heather Abbey received $13,013 from the Market and Export Development Grant (MEDG) to assist with marketing expenses for the ShopIndig.ca Cart, which features products created by Saskatchewan-based artisans.

Digital/Interactive

OneStory Inc. received $2,833 through the Market Travel Grant and Culture on the Go program to attend the Sustainable Brand Activation Hub Market Place in San Diego.

Saskatchewan Interactive Media Association (SIMA) received $20,000 through the MEDG to develop and implement an innovative website designed to market, showcase and encourage business growth for Saskatchewan’s interactive digital media industry.

Music

Close Talker received $5,000 through the Market Travel and Culture on the Go program to showcase at The Great Escape festival in Brighton, England.

Jess Moskaluke received $80,500 through the MEDG to assist with expenses related to promotion and advertising, working with a publicist, filming a music video, website and social media strategy development/implementation, and a radio tour.

Publishing

Coteau Books received $30,700 through the Creative Industries Production Grant to assist with publishing seven new titles.

University of Regina Press received $30,953 through the Market and Export Development Fund to increase market and export presence, particularly in the U.S.A., through marketing activities, publicity and print advertising.

Screen-Based Media

Two Television series received funding through the Screen-Based Media Production Grant Program: Nordic Lodge (Season 2) received $168,500, and The Prairie Diner (Season 3) received $43,216.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Creative Saskatchewan
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan receives $7.7 million (CAD) in funding annually from the Government of Saskatchewan. Of this amount, $5 million is distributed directly through grant programs and $1.5 million is targeted to support operations for six creative industry associations: SaskBooks, SaskGalleries, SaskMusic, Saskatchewan Craft Council, Saskatchewan Interactive Media Association and the Saskatchewan Media Production Industry Association. The remaining budgeted funds are targeted to marketing, trade missions, market export initiatives, professional development and administration.

The detailed financial statements of Creative Saskatchewan can be found online at the following link: http://www.creativesask.ca/

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Stakeholder consultations on the success of Creative Saskatchewan in achieving its mission and client services were conducted in 2015. The consultations led to the implementation by Creative Saskatchewan of several recommendations, including a new communications plan, a new website and an online application system, a review of program policies and procedures, an examination of funding equity, and a review of board governance.

For more information on the consultation report, please see: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/public-consultations/creative-saskatchewan-review

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Indicators used to assess successes of the Crown Agency included: alignment with Saskatchewan’s cultural policy and with sister agencies that support arts (Saskatchewan Arts Board) and culture (SaskCulture); alignment with government direction; compliance with agency legislation; progress toward agency goals; and achievements in sector development, communications and client services.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Quebec: Quebec's Digital Cultural Plan

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Digital technology has reconstructed artistic disciplines, opened markets and fragmented audiences, multiplied methods of production and dissemination, changed consumer habits and shaken up traditional business models. Aware of this evolving reality, the MCC began a vast consultation process in 2010 to determine the first steps to take in the digital transformation of culture in Quebec.

In the quadrennial periodic report on measures to protect and promote cultural diversity submitted in 2012, Quebec announced that digital cultural content would be a priority focus for the coming years and that a strategy would be developed for digital cultural content development and access.

The work begun by the MCC therefore led to the development of Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan in collaboration with the network of state-owned enterprises and organizations, as well as stakeholders in the cultural and communications field. The Plan was unveiled in 2014 and spans seven years. It helps ensure the vitality of Quebec culture and make its influence felt in local, national and international markets. It provides a basis for helping cultural environments to make a smooth transition to digital technologies so that Quebec can continue to count on that significant support for its economy and remain competitive in world markets.

Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan is based on three key strategies:

  • creating digital cultural content;
  • innovating to adapt to digital culture;
  • disseminating digital cultural content to ensure its accessibility.

The purpose of the plan is to:

  • provide cultural stakeholders with the means to create and innovate in a rapidly growing technological environment;
  • disseminate “Our culture, here, everywhere” with preference given to disseminating Quebec culture to the largest number of people in local, national and international markets.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
Regional
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan (available online in French only) proposes over 50 measures for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. Digital technology is changing quickly, and measures for later years will be specified at a later time.

The measures are grouped by main cultural sectors. The following are examples of measures by sector:

  • Drama and performing arts: help acquire digital equipment for multidisciplinary and specialized publicists.
  • Arts and literature: support artists, writers, artists’ or writers’ collectives and artistic organizations in their efforts to integrate new creation tools by funding the creation and development of original, digital cultural content.
  • Film: help regional theatre operators to disseminate cultural works using current digital technologies to provide regional public access to Quebec cultural works that are unavailable in the region.
  • Reading and books: support an update of Quebec’s public libraries’ digital collections to reach a wider readership.
  • Media: organize a one-day conference on the impacts and perspectives of changes in the media.
  • Museology: create a digital platform (EducArt) to disseminate thematic content based on the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ collections that is adapted to needs of various audiences.
  • Music: increase support for music industry businesses in adjusting to digital technologies and enriching content.
  • Heritage: develop a collaborative platform to analyze and disseminate Quebec’s archeological reference collections.
  • All sectors: coordinate and host a space to exchange ideas on the rise of digital technologies in culture (Lab culturel, available in French only).

 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Through Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan, the MCC is supporting cultural communities by taking account of the importance of the changes underway stemming from digital technologies and ensuring that Quebec’s cultural works and products are available on digital platforms, which now knows no bounds. The Plan therefore encourages the dissemination of Quebec culture to a wide audience in local, national and international markets.

The MCC must ensure that future investments reflect needs as much as possible. As a result, the MCC is part of an ongoing conversation with cultural and digital communities and paying attention to the problems and observations noted through the various consultation processes or events related to digital technologies.

In order to face the various challenges presented by digital technologies, Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan must expand the scope of its actions to reach as many stakeholders as possible in cultural, academic and other sectors for more of the cultural network to adopt digital technologies across the board.

The cultural networks, artists and public’s digital skills also need to be improved.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MCC is responsible for implementing Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan, in cooperation with cultural state-owned enterprises and organizations.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

A total of $CAD 110M has been budgeted over seven years to implement Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan. A total of $CAD 36M has been invested for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 to implement 51 measures in the following sectors:                                                                            $CAD M

  • Drama and performing arts

1.1

  • Arts and literature

6.3

  • Film

2.45

  • Reading and books

2.525

  • Media

2.05

  • Fine craft

0.2

  • Museology

10.9

  • Music

3.0

  • Heritage

5.125

  • All sectors

2.35  

TOTAL    36.0

 

An addition $CAD 10.23M was announced in 2013-2014 to fund five digital infrastructure initiatives in Quebec’s various regions.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The CRTC’s review of its television policies to facilitate the transition to an increasingly on-demand environment

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The television system is undergoing a fundamental shift brought on by broadband Internet and wireless networks. Increasingly, Canadians seek greater control over the programs they watch and access content on an even wider array of devices, sometimes bypassing the traditional curators of content, such as broadcasters and distributors.

In response to this changing environment, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) launched Let's Talk TV: A conversation with Canadians in 2013, a consultation about the future of the television system and how it can adapt to evolving technologies and new consumption habits. The two-year process, involving three phases and innovative engagement methods, produced a record 13,000 interventions from Canadians, industry, and interested stakeholders. Subsequent decisions and three new policies were released in early 2015 to ensure that Canadians are at the center of a diverse, affordable, responsive and forward-looking television system.

The detailed implications of these new policies are starting to be known but have yet to fully unfold at this stage. This will be a topic of interest for Canada’s next periodic report.

Based on the assumption that Canadians will continue to migrate from scheduled television and packaged programming services to an on-demand and tailored television environment, the CRTC has adopted measures designed to facilitate that transition. These measures are meant to provide incentives for all players in the broadcasting system to find new and innovative approaches to support the creation of compelling and diverse programming.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The measures are based on four themes:

A. Making Canadian programming widely available and visible

To increase country-wide access to Canadian programming on Canadian-operated online platforms, the CRTC created a new hybrid video-on-demand (VOD) service category, which is exempted from the requirement to hold a broadcasting license. This will remove barriers for Canadian companies and allow them to compete in an on-demand environment.

In order to ensure that the contents of programming packages align with the needs and interests of Canadians, an industry working group is developing new tools, such as an audience measurement system.

The CRTC hosted a summit on the discoverability of Canadian television programs in early 2016.

B. An emphasis on quality rather than quantity

To support the production of high-quality programming, the CRTC is shifting from a regulatory approach based on exhibition quotas (the number of hours of Canadian programming broadcast) to one based on expenditures (the amount of money spent on Canadian programming).

C. Regulatory support for specific types of programming which are of interest, but only where market failure is demonstrated

The CRTC is eliminating the genre exclusivity policy, which limited programming services to offering only certain types of programming and precluded others from offering the same. In doing so, the CRTC allows new services to enter the marketplace, programming flexibility, and greater domestic competition. This ensures that programming diversity is governed by market forces to the greatest extent possible, as services will be able to respond to consumers and adopt creative strategies.

However, the CRTC maintained support mechanisms for the types of programs considered to be of national interest (documentaries and dramas), and strengthened its criteria for national news services.

D. A simplified and streamlined licensing process

The CRTC is instituting measures to reduce regulatory burden by exempting a greater number of programming services from the requirement to hold a broadcasting license.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

A concerted effort by all players in the broadcasting system, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), is currently under way to find new and innovative approaches to support the creation of compelling and diverse Canadian programming. The measures outlined by the CRTC to address the ongoing television system’s transition to an increasingly on-demand environment are designed to focus on the creation and distribution of quality Canadian content which will appeal to a worldwide audience. Increased flexibility will enable broadcasters to adapt to the shifting digital environment and to improve the promotion and discoverability of Canadian programming in an on-demand digital world.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Book Fund (CBF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Book Fund (CBF) ensures access to a diverse range of Canadian-authored books nationally and internationally, by fostering a strong book industry that publishes and markets Canadian-authored books. The Government of Canada provides support for the Canadian book industry through two main streams of the CBF: Support for Publishers and Support for Organizations, the former with two components: Publishing Support and Business Development.

The Publishing Support component strengthens the Canadian book industry by providing financial assistance to publishers for the ongoing production, marketing and distribution of Canadian-authored books. Supplementary funding based on export sales is also available as part of Publishing Support. The Business Development component strengthens the Canadian book industry by providing financial assistance to publishers for the following projects: publishing internships, technology internships and business planning.

Support for Organizations helps organizations and associations in the Canadian book industry with two key objectives in mind: the marketing and promotion of Canadian-authored books, and strengthening the infrastructure and capacity of the industry.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The bulk of Canada Book Fund (CBF) support is delivered through the Support for Publishers stream, which provides funding distributed primarily through a formula that rewards success in delivering content that Canadians value. This funding contributes to the ongoing production and marketing of Canadian-authored books by offsetting the high costs of publishing in Canada and building the capacity and competitiveness of the sector.

In 2014, the funding for the CBF was renewed permanently. The objectives of the renewal were that the program would be focused on digital innovation and international competitiveness while working within the existing budget.

Changes to the program included the following:

  • Significant overhaul of the formula designed to provide greater support to smaller businesses that need it most, provide greater focus on digital sales, and simplify the overall approach.
  • Lower barriers to entry for newer, innovative businesses (requisite period of 36 months in business reduced to 12 months).
  • An obligation for publishers (with some exceptions) to publish e-books (effective 2016-17) and a stronger emphasis on rewarding their success in selling them.
  • Digital-only publishers and digital-only titles are now eligible for funding.
  • Priority is given to projects with an international focus (particularly those that focus on digital exports).
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected results for the Canada Book Fund (CBF) are the following:

  • Readers everywhere have access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books produced by CBF recipients.
  • Readers everywhere consume a broad range of Canadian authored books supported by the CBF.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Canada Book Fund (CBF) has an annual budget of $39.1 million CAD, and provides annual funding through two streams:

- Support for Publishers, which has a budget of $30.7 million CAD.

- Support for Organizations, which has a budget of $6 million CAD.

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation of the Canada Book Fund was completed in 2014. The evaluation, which was conducted by the Evaluation Services Directorate of the Department of Canadian Heritage, in conjunction with a third-party consulting firm, is part of the normal Government of Canada program assessment process. The evaluation concluded that the program remains relevant, well-aligned with government objectives and has achieved its expected outcomes. The evaluation recommended that the program provide support to recipients that will encourage greater production, marketing and sales of digital books.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The following expected outcomes were identified for the Canada Book Fund (CBF): (1) creation of a diverse range of Canadian-authored books; (2) accessibility for consumption of a diverse range of Canadian-authored books in Canada and abroad; and (3) support for the viability of Canada’s book publishing industry.

For the first expected outcome, the following indicators were examined: the number of new eligible works funded by the CBF, as well as the diversity of works according to language, province of production and literary genre. With respect to the second expected outcome, the evaluation looked at Canadians’ book consumption habits, the revenues of CBF-funded publishers, the diversity of Canadian-authored titles sold by program-funded publishers, and the effectiveness of program support for promotion and marketing. As for the third outcome, the following indicators were assessed: the number and diversity of publishers in Canada’s book industry, the long-term profit margin of Canadian book publishers, and the extent of their participation in new technologies and best practices.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) co-administers two tax credit programs with the Canada Revenue Agency: The Canadian Film or Video Tax Credit Program (CPTC) for Canadian content; and The Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) for non-Canadian content.

The key objectives of CAVCO are to encourage Canadian programming and to stimulate the development of an active domestic independent production sector, as well as to stimulate job growth by encouraging Canadians and foreign-based film producers to employ the services of Canadians. CAVCO provides certification for an eligible production, confirming that it meets the requirements of the two programs described above and can receive a tax credit from the Canada Revenue Agency.

To be recognized as a Canadian film or video production, a live action production must be allotted a total of at least six points according to the creative points scale below.  Points will only be awarded if the person(s) who rendered the services is/are Canadian.

Director - 2 points; Screenwriter - 2 points; Lead performer for whose services the highest remuneration was payable  - 1 point; Lead performer for whose services the second highest remuneration was payable - 1 point; Director of photography - 1 point; Art director - 1 point; Music composer - 1 point; Picture editor - 1 point.

When a production meets the CPTC program requirements, CAVCO makes a recommendation to the Minister of Canadian Heritage to issue a Canadian film or video production certificate.  The certificate also provides an estimate of the production's qualified labour expenditures, needed for calculating the tax credit. The certificate is based on an analysis of detailed cost estimates, financing plans including amounts deemed assistance, and the Canadian content requirements of the CPTC program.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO), along with the Canada Revenue Agency, administers the following refundable tax credit programs to support the film and television production industry in Canada:  

1) The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC) encourages the creation of Canadian programming and the development of an active domestic independent production sector. It is available to Canadian production companies for productions qualified as Canadian content; qualified productions must meet specific criteria for key creative personnel and production costs. The CPTC is available at a rate of 25 percent of the qualified labour expenditure.

2) The Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) encourages the employment of Canadians by taxable Canadian or foreign-owned corporations with a permanent establishment in Canada. The PSTC is equal to 16 percent of salary and wages paid to Canadian residents or taxable Canadian corporations for services provided to the production in Canada.

The first program is cultural. It credits Canadian labour expenses on Canadian content productions that are owned and controlled by Canadians.  The second program is purely industrial. It invites the world to film their productions in Canada. Companies that service non-content productions can get a credit on the Canadian labor they employ. The PSTC builds up the Canadian production infrastructure when foreign companies come to Canada to film their productions.

The Canadian tax credit model has been replicated around the world because it is seen as a stable and effective way to offer government support. Together, both programs cost the federal government some $380 million annually depending on the level of production activity. The total volume of film and television production in Canada reached an all-time high of $7.1 billion in production activity in 2014-15.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The results expected from the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) are as follows:

1) Canadian content film and television productions receive certification from the Department of Canadian Heritage.

2) Non-Canadian content film and television productions using Canadian production services receive accreditation from the Department of Canadian Heritage.

In turn, this will contribute to Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content being created and accessible at home and abroad. Reaching Canadian audiences with more Canadian content remains the key underlying goal of the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC). Through this program, the Government of Canada can invest in this cultural vehicle and make possible the production of thousands of hours of Canadian content. As all Canadian content productions must be shown in Canada, Canadians have the opportunity to see them. This helps meet the overall departmental objective of reaching Canadian audiences.  

Another key expected result is related to the economic growth generated by such foreign productions and the expertise acquired by workers and technicians employed in the film and video industry sector.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Actual spending in 2013-14 was $ - 409,992 CAD. This negative number represents a surplus or, as for CAVCO, revenues. CAVCO collects user fees from clients. As its planned and actual revenues were higher than its expenditures, CAVCO generated revenues in 2013-14.

For more information, please see: http://www.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-verEval-audEval/STAGING/texte-text/dpr-rmr-2013-14_1415218344790_eng.pdf

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Tax credit programs are seen as a very stable and predictable form of government support that act to leverage other public and private contributions and against which banks are willing to lend.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Performance Indicator 1: Stability and predictability

While foreign sources of production financing have decreased and Canadian television licenses are static, tax credits have provided an ongoing and stable source of funding. Stable funding allows companies to survive through lean times.

Performance Indicator 2: Reaching Canadian audiences

A greater amount of Canadian content is now available. Through the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC), the government’s investment in this cultural vehicle has made possible the production of thousands of hours of Canadian content. A higher amount of Canadian content ensures that it is available for audiences that want to watch it.

Performance Indicator 3: Corporate financing vehicle

The CPTC has not yet met its stated objective of having a stable form of corporate financing. Rising production costs and lower amounts of foreign financing force producers to invest the credit in the production rather than in their corporations. As well, Telefilm Canada and other investors force producers to use the credit as production financing. The CPTC will be evaluated in 2016.

Performance Indicator 4: Employment

Tax credits are economic engines that help to create direct and indirect employment.  For instance, the Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) builds up the Canadian production infrastructure when foreign companies come to Canada to shoot their productions. Since 1997, this industrial model has injected $24.4 billion of new money into the Canadian economy. This new money has more than repaid the tax expenditures spent by the government on tax credit.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) provided by the Department of Canadian Heritage aims to give Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. The CAPF recognizes that arts presenters are key partners in achieving this objective by providing financial assistance to organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series and organizations that offer support to arts presenters. The fund is available to presenters and organizations across Canada, including those in underserved communities and populations.

Through the CAPF, Canadians have access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. Each year, the CAPF supports approximately 600 professional arts festivals and performing arts series, as well as other activities related to arts presentation, in more than 250 cities and communities across Canada.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) has two main components – Programming and Development. The CAPF Programming component has two streams: Professional Arts Festivals and Performing Arts Series Presenters, and Presenter Support Organizations.

The CAPF Programming component provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as their support organizations.  In 2014-15, the program funded recipients in 250 communities across the country through 242 festivals, 262 performing arts series, 82 organizations that presented both a festival and a series, and 29 presenter support organizations.

The CAPF program also has a Development component to support the emergence of arts presenters and support organizations for underserved communities and populations such as aboriginal, ethnocultural, official language minority communities, youth, remote and rural communities, and contemporary artistic disciplines and genres.

Examples of recipients funded under the CAPF include the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto, Ontario, the Manitoba Theatre for Young People based in Winnipeg, the Festival international Nuits d'Afrique in Montréal, Quebec, and the Calgary International Reggae Festival (ReggaeFest) in Alberta.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) is expected to achieve two goals:

1. To ensure Canadian not-for-profit arts organizations offer a variety of arts festivals and series through funding provided by the CAPF.

2. To give Canadians, including those in underserved communities, access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities.

In 2014-15, the CAPF achieved both goals by providing funding support to encourage recipients in providing program variety and interaction between artists and citizens, as well as the presentation of challenging and innovative artistic experiences in Canada. These results, which are consistent with the past two years, reflect the CAPF's goals to fund recipients to present a wide range of artistic performances reflecting Canadian cultural and regional diversity, to reach underserved communities, and to encourage Canadians to engage and participate in artistic experiences. Ultimately, the long-term results of the CAPF will allow Canadians to experience and value professional artistic experiences.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

In 2014-15, the budgetary financial resourced dedicated to the program were $34,711,933 CAD.

For detailed figures, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation focused on the period from 2007-08 to 2012-13 was conducted for three Canadian Heritage Programs included in the Arts Policy Branch: the Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF), Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF), and Canada Cultural Investment Fund (CCIF). As specified by Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada’s Directive on the Evaluation Policy (2009), the core issues addressed in this evaluation were: relevance, including continued need for the programs, alignment with government priorities, alignment with federal roles and responsibilities, and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy.

The main conclusions and findings are that there is a continuing need for ongoing federal government support to the arts and heritage sector through programs such as the CAPF, which helps ensure that all Canadians have access to and benefit from arts and heritage experiences. Factors such as the digital revolution, the economic downturn and changing demographics contribute to the need for federal government support to ensure that arts and culture remain accessible, relevant, and sustainable.

The evaluation also found that the CAPF enabled a large number of arts presenters to reach a wide range of communities and audiences, expose communities to various professional artistic experiences, strengthen their linkages in the community, and further develop their professional skills. On average, nearly 600 projects were funded annually across a wide range of disciplines, communities and groups, including underserved populations. About 65% of communities reached with the CAPF programming component and 28% of communities reached with the development component were rural and remote.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Canadians in all regions of the country engage and participate in a variety of professional artistic experiences:

  • Number and type of communities reached (by population size/urban, rural and remote)
  • Number and percentage of professional arts presenters that reach out to underserved communities

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-PCH2-PCH-InstitutionalProfile/STAGING/texte-text/2014_Grouped_Arts_Evaluation_1453817656247_eng.pdf

 
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Eye on Canada

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

In June of 2013 at the Banff World Media Festival, the Eye on Canada brand was launched as part of a national strategy to promote Canadian content. It was developed by Telefilm, the Canada Media Fund, and the Canadian Media Production Association to unite all initiatives surrounding the promotion of Canadian audiovisual content and to resonate with various audiences at home and internationally. The brand is a conversation-starter for use by all Canadians to celebrate and promote the diversity and quality of Canadian audiovisual content, including feature films, television and digital media.

The site www.eyeoncanada.ca is a user-friendly online property that celebrates the uniqueness and diversity of Canada’s thriving audiovisual industry. Users of the site, which is updated regularly, will find new original content like interviews with cast members, producers and those involved in the creative process.

 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Eye on Canada branding initiative resulted in the creation of a bilingual website: http://www.eyeoncanada.ca/  and a growing discussion on social media with the hashtag #eyeoncanada.

On the website, contemporary Canadian screen-based content is curated for Canadian and international audiences, and allows viewers to browse or search for works. Designed with consumers of Canadian feature film, television and digital media, such as videogames, in mind, the website features profile pages on Canadian productions – past and present – featuring trailers, official pictures and production details, including information on lead cast members. The website also provides access to dynamic social media content so that users can follow and join the conversation on their favourite productions or discover new ones. It invites users to share and engage in conversations through the use of the hashtag #eyeoncanada, which unifies online discussion about Canadian screen-based content. Introduced in 2013, this hashtag is used as a reference by a growing number of supporters of Canadian content.

Users are able to access curated editorial content from well-known Canadian bloggers and vloggers regarding the latest news from the Canadian screen-based entertainment industry. A newsletter also allows subscribers to be the first to know about updates to Eye on Canada.

To help to make eyeoncanada.ca a destination for Canadian content, producers are invited to submit their film, television, and digital media productions to the Eye on Canada collection through an online form found on the website, making it easier for audiences to discover their work.

For more information, please see: https://www.telefilm.ca/en/news/releases/2015/03/03/eyeoncanadaca-celebrates-canadian-television-feature-film-and-digital-media

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

It is expected that the Eye on Canada brand will help promote Canadian screen-based content both in Canada and internationally. The website www.eyeoncanada.ca is expected to broaden audiences, helping Canadian producers gain exposure. Finally, the #eyeoncanada hashtag being used throughout social media will help to promote the national discussion about film, television and digital media.

 
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Telefilm Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Media Fund (CMF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The mission of the Canada Media Fund (CMF) is to foster, promote, develop and finance the production of Canadian content and relevant applications for all audiovisual media platforms. The CMF funds the sustainable production of screen-based Canadian content across multiple platforms such as television, wireless devices or the internet. Its goal is to guide Canadian content towards a competitive global environment through fostering industry innovation, rewarding success, enabling a diversity of voices and promoting access to content through industry and private sector partnerships. Created by Canada’s cable, satellite, and IPTV distributors and the Government of Canada, the CMF aspires to connect Canadians to their creative expressions, to each other, and to the world. From its launch in 2010-11 to 2013-14, the CMF leveraged $3.40 of activity for every dollar invested, for a total of $4.8 billion in industry activity.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Launched in 2010, the Canada Media Fund (CMF) is an arm’s-length public-private partnership, funded by the Government of Canada and Canadian cable, satellite, and IPTV distributors. The CMF is an independent corporation: while the Government sets out the policy parameters for the CMF, the Fund has its own Board of Directors, and the guidelines and administration of the funding program are its own responsibility. This governance model allows content review and creation to be separate from political involvement. The CMF regularly consults industry stakeholders in a regular, formal, inclusive and meaningful way.

The CMF promotes, develops and finances the production of Canadian content and applications for all audiovisual media platforms. The CMF delivers financial support to the Canadian television and digital media industries through two streams of funding. The Convergent Stream supports the creation of innovative, convergent television and digital media content for consumption by Canadians. The Experimental Stream encourages the creation of leading-edge, interactive digital media content and software applications. In 2014-15, the CMF contributed $365.6 million to Canadian television and digital media projects, triggering $1.3 billion in production activity. Through the Convergent Stream, 505 productions received $311.3 million in funding, which generated 2,800 hours of new content. Through the Experimental Stream, 108 innovative projects were selected and received $38.6 million in funding. The CMF also provides funding to television and digital media coproductions between Canadian and international producers (see measure entitled “Canada Media Fund’s funding for international coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction”).

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) is expected to continue to support the sustainable production of Canadian screen-based media across multiple platforms. It is expected to help Canadian content remain competitive in the global digital environment.

The vision of the CMF is that “Canadians and world audiences have access to and demand innovative, successful Canadian television and digital content on all platforms.”

For more information on the vision and mission of the CMF, please see its annual report: http://ar-ra14-15.cmf-fmc.ca/

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Government of Canada (The Department of Canadian Heritage)
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) receives financial contributions from the Government of Canada and Canada’s cable, satellite and IPTV distributors. Through CRTC regulations, broadcast distributors are required to make an annual contribution of 5% of their annual broadcasting revenues to Canadian programming, most of which goes to the CMF. The Government has provided $134.1 million per year in ongoing stable funding to the CMF since 2010-11.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

After the evaluation of its activities from 2010 to 2014, the Evaluation Services of the Department of Canadian Heritage concluded, among other things, that the Canada Media Fund (CMF):

1. Is responsive to the needs of Canadians

The CMF is the most important source of financing for Canadian digital content in the drama, documentary, children/youth, variety and performing arts genres. It addresses the issues associated with the small size of the official language markets, including the financial disincentives associated with creating original programming as compared to acquiring less expensive foreign content. The evaluation observed that the Government’s objectives in connection with official language minority communities in Canada are reinforced by the CMF through its support for productions in Aboriginal and official language minority communities.

2. Aligns with the priorities of the Government of Canada

The CMF’s mandate and objectives supports the federal government’s priority and the Department’s strategic outcome that "Canadian artistic expressions are created and accessible at home and abroad.” It is also consistent with the departmental priority of “taking full advantage of digital technology” and reinforces the Government’s digital agenda.

3. Aligns to Federal roles and responsibilities

The CMF is well aligned with the Government’s roles and responsibilities as it is an instrument to support Canadian broadcasting policy. The CMF supports the Department and its responsibility to ensure that the broadcasting and digital communications sectors contribute to the objectives set out in the Broadcasting Act.

The full evaluation can be found here: http://www.cmf-fmc.ca/documents/files/news/2015/dch-cmf-evaluation-summary.pdf

 
i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The evaluation was conducted in accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat evaluation policy framework and in accordance with the Federal Accountability Act and the Financial Administration Act. It addressed the core issues of relevance and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy. The evaluation process included the following activities: a literature review to conduct a scan of the broadcasting and digital media environments and comparative analysis with other similar programs; a document review; key informant interviews with stakeholder groups; case studies; a value-for-money analysis; an expert panel; and a “Looking Forward” analysis was conducted to contextualize the current evaluation within the rapidly evolving broadcasting and digital media industry. The evaluation covered the activities and expected outcomes of the program, including the Canada Media Fund (CMF) Corporation. Excluded from the scope of the evaluation were areas of activity which have an impact on the CMF, but on which the Department has no authority or limited influence, such as the performance of the CMF Board members.

❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

An audiovisual treaty coproduction is a feature film or television production that has been created by pooling the creative, technical and financial resources of Canadian and foreign producers. Governed under the terms of a treaty, these productions are granted national status, and as such, are also eligible for federal and provincial tax credits and additional funding sources such as the Canada Media Fund and the Canada Feature Film Fund. In addition, treaty coproductions qualify for Canadian content quotas for broadcasting, which offers Canadian producers greater opportunity for broadcasting their project on a Canadian network during prime viewing time, and for obtaining higher license fees for their productions.

Canada was one of the first countries to recognize the advantages of audiovisual treaty coproductions.  These treaties have advanced the audiovisual industry in Canada, strengthening international ties in the cultural sector; and promoting and disseminating Canadian culture abroad.

In recent years, the international audiovisual coproduction environment has experienced significant changes due to technological advances and greater global competition for investment. In light of these changes, in February 2011 the Government of Canada announced Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction to position Canada as an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice. The policy incorporates input from previous consultations with federal, provincial and territorial partners, as well as industry stakeholders’ comments, to set out the best direction for Government action in support of audiovisual treaty coproduction activity.

The guiding principles of flexibility; openness to renegotiation and negotiation of treaties; alignment of coproduction promotional activities; and simplification of administrative procedures help to achieve the policy’s objective.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Positioning Canada as an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice will attract foreign investment that will help further seize the benefits of coproduction for Canadian industry and audiences. Reaching this objective guides the Government’s approach to all aspects of treaty coproduction – from developing the terms of treaties and selecting potential partner countries to negotiate with, to managing and coordinating coproduction administration in Canada.

In March 2013, the Government announced the implementation of Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction, which is achieved through the negotiation of audiovisual coproduction treaties using a new model treaty that responds to the evolving audiovisual practices and technological changes over time. The model treaty serves as Canada’s negotiation position and is not shared publicly.

The decision to negotiate a treaty is based on how well the foreign partner is aligned with the Government of Canada’s priorities and policies, including Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction and those relating to foreign relations and international trade. In selecting coproduction partners, determining factors include whether the partner:

  • shares Canada's economic and industrial approach;
  • represents a key coproduction market for Canada's audiovisual industry;
  • offers a significant potential audience thereby increasing viewership;
  • represents a strong trade partnership for Canada; and
  • whether the treaty coproductions undertaken with this partner will yield economic benefits to Canada.

From Canada's perspective, every audiovisual coproduction treaty must stimulate investment in Canada, create opportunities for the Canadian audiovisual industry to access new markets, generate employment for Canadians and establish or expand international markets for Canadian talent and audiovisual productions.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Through the implementation of Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction, it is expected that Canada will be positioned as an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice and will attract foreign investment that will help develop outstanding infrastructure and talent in Canada’s audiovisual industry, enhance its international competitiveness, assist the industry to adapt to a rapidly changing audiovisual environment, and showcase Canadian content and creators to audiences in Canada and abroad.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
Telefilm Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The implementation of Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction does not require the investment of financial resources, other than human resource expenditures by the Department of Canadian Heritage.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

Quebec: Cooperation initiatives led by Quebec within international organizations

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

On a multilateral level, the Government of Quebec is contributing to strengthening international collaboration, mainly within two international organizations: UNESCO and the International Organisation of la Francophonie (IOF).

In those organizations, the Government of Quebec supports initiatives and gives preference to issues it considers to be a priority in relation to Quebec’s International Policy, the purpose of which is notably to strengthen Quebec’s capacity for action and influence, promote Quebec’s identity and culture and contribute to the global international solidarity effort.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

International Organisation of la Francophonie

The Government of Quebec is a full member of the IOF, which includes 75 states and governments (56 members and 19 observers). As the fifth financial backer of the IOF, it actively supports carrying out IOF programming. The IOF’s various cultural programs help support production, distribution and dissemination in areas like the performing arts, digital arts, media, multimedia and media arts, literature and music.

The Government of Quebec also supports the actions carried out by the Agence universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF) in its 2014-2017 cultural programming. As an operator of la Francophonie, the AUF brings together higher education and research institutions, totalling 812 member institutions in 104 countries. As a result, it represents one of the largest university associations in the world.

UNESCO

The Government of Quebec also contributes to strengthening international collaboration within UNESCO by fostering the emergency of dynamic cultural sectors in developing countries through its contribution to the IFCD. Along with other contributors, it encourages carrying out projects to:

  • develop policies and strategies that have a direct impact on the creation, production and distribution of diverse cultural expressions, as well as access to them;
  • strengthen institutional infrastructures that are deemed necessary to support viable cultural industries on the local and regional scale.

In 2015, the Government of Quebec’s contribution was provided by the MCC, MRIF, CALQ and SODEC.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

By supporting measures as part of IOF and UNESCO’s IFCD programs, the Government of Quebec is working towards the following objectives:

International Organisation of la Francophonie

  • Promote and enhance the status of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions;
  • Assist states in developing and reviewing their cultural policies;
  • Support the structuring of cultural industry channels;
  • Support the movement of artists, thanks notably to the fund supporting the circulation of artists;
  • Support the dissemination and marketing of cultural products from the south;
  • Support the production, promotion and marketing of audiovisual work from southern countries.

UNESCO

  • Meet the needs and priorities of countries where projects are carried out;
  • Contribute to obtaining concrete, measurable, realistic and lasting results;
  • Have a potential structural impact leading to the emergence of a dynamic cultural sector;
  • Encourage South-South and North-South-South cooperation
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
•UNESCO : MCC, MRIF, CALQ, and SODEC •IOF and AUF: MRIF
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

IOF

In 2015, the Government of Quebec spent $CAD 3.1M on carrying out IOF (non-operational) programming. With a total programming budget of $CAD 58.8M (€38.8M), an estimate 12% of IOF programming funds are dedicated to culture. As a result, Quebec’s funding for IOF cultural programming is estimated at $CAD 403K.

AUF

The Government of Quebec allocated $CAD 560K to the AUF in 2015 to carry out its (non-operational) programming. An indeterminate portion of that amount was dedicated to cultural programming.

UNESCO

Since it was founded, the Government of Quebec has contributed a total $CAD 250K to the IFCD. In 2015, the Government of Quebec allocated $CAD 50K to the IFCD. More specifically, four Quebec ministries and organizations contributed:

  • MRIF: $CAD 20K
  • MCC: $CAD 20K
  • CALQ: $CAD 5K
  • SODEC: $CAD 5K
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
No
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

The Canada Media Fund’s support for international digital media coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) supports the coproduction and co-development of content with international partners. The CMF supports international coproductions through its Convergent and Experimental streams. In 2014-15, international treaty coproductions represented a small portion of CMF Convergent funded projects (2.1% of all funding), and four international coproductions were funded through the Experimental stream.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

A Digital Media Coproduction Incentive was introduced as a pilot program in 2013-14. It funded two international digital media coproductions: one was an Experimental stream project and one was Convergent. Expanding from this pilot coproduction incentive, three new incentives were implemented in 2014-15. The incentives target both Experimental and Convergent digital media projects. The new incentives are co-ventures with foreign funders, a result of a global outreach for coproduction partners on behalf of Canadian producers. The first is the Canada-New Zealand Digital Media Fund, which partnered with NZ On Air on three Experimental coproduction projects. The second is the Canada-Wallonia Digital Media Incentive for Multiplatform Projects, which partnered with Wallimage of Belgium in the development of two Experimental projects. The foreign partners contributed a total of $654,000 to projects funded by the Canada Media Fund (CMF). Thirdly, the Digital Media Codevelopment & Coproduction Incentive funded five projects in both Convergent and Experimental streams, with coproducers from the United Kingdom, France, Colombia, and Denmark.

For more information, please see: http://ar-ra13-14.cmf-fmc.ca/funding/convergent/intl_co_prod/

The CMF is also a partner in the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction. The Framework is the result of consultations with the industry with a goal of accessing new opportunities and partnerships. It recognizes and promotes international coproductions specifically in digital media between Canada and other countries. The partners in the Framework seek to encourage international cooperation and to foster global brand management strategies for multiplatform content and digital media properties. They are: the Bell Broadcast and New Media Fund, the Independent Production Fund, the Quebecor Fund, Shaw Rocket Fund, as well as the CMF.

For more information, please see: http://www.cmf-fmc.ca/documents/files/programs/2016-17/apps/cnv/dm-int-co-pro-framework.pdf

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Media Fund’s (CMF) support for international digital media coproductions, including the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction, is expected to facilitate coproductions between Canadian and foreign producers by increasing access to funding and easing the negotiation process. The CMF will continue to support the production costs of future digital media coproductions, encouraging international partners to work with Canadian producers to create innovative and interactive digital media. The Framework will streamline the funding process, as international coproduction partners will be able to apply for several funds at once. As a result, the number of digital media coproduction partnerships is also expected to increase.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Media Fund
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

In the 2014-15 fiscal year, the Canada Media Fund (CMF) Funding, International Digital Media Coproduction and Codevelopment Incentives totalled $972,000 CAD.

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
The Bell Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Bell Fund is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. The Fund encourages and funds the creation and development of excellent Canadian digital/TV multi-platform projects, and its mandate is to advance the Canadian broadcasting system. It has invested in the production of digital media and new media projects associated with television productions since 1997, and has five digital media funding programs.

The Bell Fund is a not-for-profit organization, certified by the CRTC as an independent production fund eligible to receive and administer contributions from broadcast distribution undertakings. It is governed by a nine member Board of Directors operating as an arms-length corporation with representatives from broadcasting, the television and digital media production sectors and from Bell TV and its affiliates.

Name: 
The Independent Production Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Independent Production Fund, created by various independent broadcasters, is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. The Fund was established in 1991 by Maclean Hunter Limited, and has since become independent of any parent company. It offers a Web Drama Series funding program.

Name: 
The Quebecor Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Quebecor Fund is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. Founded in 1999, the Quebecor Fund contributes to the development of Canadian content production and simultaneously promotes the use of new broadcasting models. It offers two programs: the Main Television Production Assistance Program (MPAP) and the Event and Film Production Assistance Program (EFPAP), which cover interactive digital media components. To date, through the Main Television Production Assistance Program (MPAP), and the Event and Film Production Assistance Program (EFPAP), the Quebecor Fund has helped producers and distributors produce several high quality projects that have been broadcast on over 33 different Canadian networks. The Quebecor Fund is a non-profit organization incorporated as a company.

Name: 
The Shaw Rocket Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Shaw Rocket Fund is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. The Shaw Rocket Fund, working in partnership with youth, is dedicated to investing in the Canadian children’s and youth production industry with a broader mission of championing Canadian children’s programming in Canada and around the world.

The Shaw Rocket Fund is a permanent, independently governed, not-for-profit corporation that provides equity financing for the production of high quality Canadian children’s, youth and family programming. The Rocket Fund is a continuation of Shaw Communications’ ongoing commitment to Canadian children’s programming. It is the largest private funder dedicated to Canadian children’s media for independent producers. Since 1998, the Shaw Rocket Fund has invested $127 million in 529 children’s programs.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The activities of the Canada Media Fund over the period between 2010 and 2014 were evaluated by the Evaluation Services of the Department of Canadian Heritage. While the Canada Media Fund’s support for international digital media coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction were not the subject of a distinct evaluation, they were included in the overall evaluation. Please see the measure “Canada Media Fund” under the section “Cultural Policies” for the main conclusions and indicators of the evaluation.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Please see the measure “Canada Media Fund” under the section “Cultural Policies” for the main conclusions and indicators of the evaluation.

❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

Facilitating the temporary entry/work of foreign artists in Canada

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

First, supporting the international mobility of artists offers Canadians greater and more diversified access to foreign talent. This exposure allows for learning opportunities, and a deeper understanding and appreciation of global art and cultures. Second, attracting elite talent infuses domestic industries with unique and world-class cultural knowledge, skills, and creativity. This, in turn, stimulates and builds capacity to develop home-grown talent. Third, by reducing barriers to cultural exchanges and forging relationships with other countries and artists, Canada creates reciprocal opportunities for Canadians abroad and enhances its reputation among international artistic communities. Lastly, facilitating foreign artists supports existing public investments in arts and culture, and has the potential to attract high-value work to Canada. An open door policy encourages the creation and maintenance of vibrant and sustainable arts and cultural industries in Canada.

In Canada, foreign artists may be authorized to work without a work permit. Typically, they perform in Canada for a limited period of time, are not being hired for ongoing employment, and are not involved in making a film, television or radio show. They include:

  • Musical and theatrical individuals/group and their essential crew;
  • Street performers and DJs;
  • Circuses;
  • Guest artists performing with a Canadian performance group for a time-limited engagement;
  • Performers at a private event for a time-limited engagement;
  • Artists working at or attending a showcase/workshop;
  • Visual artists creating or displaying their work;
  • Film producers;
  • Small groups of film and recording studio renters (not entering the labour market);
  • Short-term, essential personnel for a foreign-financed commercial shoot.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The International Mobility Program, whose primary objective is to advance Canada’s broad economic and national interests, is an avenue for facilitation of foreign artists' entry into Canada. The program supports key international agreements and partnerships, such as reciprocal cultural treaties between Canada and countries like Belgium, Brazil, Germany, Italy, Japan and Mexico. Foreign artists entering Canada to take employment under the terms of such treaties require a work permit, but are exempted from the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA).

Television and film:

Foreign nationals in the television and film industry whose position is essential to a production may be eligible for an LMIA exemption where: the positions are high-wage and unionized; the television or film production meets the criteria to be eligible for government tax credits; and the relevant union/guild has no objections.

Work that is essential to television and film production creates significant economic benefits and opportunities for Canada. This exemption applies to television and film production in Canada, regardless of whether the production is foreign or Canadian and whether it is filmed entirely or partially in Canada.

Performing Arts:

Creative personnel employed by non-profit dance, opera, orchestra and live theatre organizations may also be eligible for an LMIA exemption where: the organization receives funding from the Canada Council for the Arts or via parliamentary appropriation; and the relevant Canadian performing arts representative or organization demonstrates reciprocity for the discipline.

Facilitating the entry of foreign nationals working in these fields contributes to competitive advantages and reciprocal benefits for all Canadians, including performing artists and performing arts organizations.

For more information, please see:
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/temp/work/permit/arts/index.asp

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The exemptions under the International Mobility Program are expected to support and enhance public access and investments in arts and culture and/or provide Canadians with similar opportunities abroad. By facilitating the international mobility of artists, both domestic and overseas industries benefit from an exchange of skills, experiences, and perspectives, and Canada continues to attract valuable work and talent. Overall, the measures contribute to Canada’s ability to be an internationally-recognized hub of artistic excellence and cultural innovation.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

National Film Board’s digital distribution partnership with China’s Phoenix New Media Limited

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) is a federal cultural agency within the portfolio of the Department of Canadian Heritage which creates ground-breaking interactive works, social-issue documentaries and auteur animation. During the 2012-13 fiscal year, many of the NFB’s efforts were centred on managing existing relationships with other organizations and signing new partnerships with leading content aggregators and digital distributors.

In 2013, the NFB partnered with China’s Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG) to create NFB ZONE, the first Canadian-branded online channel in the People’s Republic of China. The channel offers Chinese internet users access to films produced and distributed by the publicly-funded Canadian filmmaker. Phoenix New Media, a private-sector media company, offers premium content across internet, mobile and TV channels in China, and its web portal and mobile channels reach 300 million page views each day.

The strategic partnership aims to enrich the NFB’s global distribution channels and Phoenix’s video content library, as well as to offer Chinese audiences an ideal destination to reach high-quality Canadian-produced documentaries and animated films. This partnership is the result of years of engagement between the NFB and Chinese partners, working together to forge relationships and utilize mobile media technology to build cultural bridges and business opportunities.

For more information, please see: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/rapp_annuel_ONF_ang_2012-2013.pdf

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

In May 2013, the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and Chinese company Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG) announced the creation of NFB ZONE, the first Canadian-branded online channel in the People’s Republic of China. This unprecedented partnership, which permits the airing of almost 130 NFB animated and documentary films, is in line with the NFB’s business plan favouring the creation of strategic partnerships and strengthening its leadership in the new international digital media landscape.

For more information, please see: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/en/about-the-nfb/publications/institutional-publications/departmental-performance-report-2012-2013/

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The strategic partnership between the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG) will lead to an increased audience and exposure for documentaries and animated films which are produced by the NFB, through digital distribution across multiple platforms in China. Consequently, the increased level of exposure will lead to stronger recognition of Canadian audiovisual content abroad, allowing the NFB to grow its international reputation.

This measure will also favour the creation of further strategic partnerships and strengthen the NFB’s leadership in the new international digital media landscape. 2013 was the final chapter of the NFB’s 2008–2013 Strategic Plan that proposed a sweeping transformation of the film board, and challenged it to lead the way in the new digital age with productions that placed Canada at the forefront of digital media innovation.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The National Film Board of Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG)
Type of Entity: 
Private company
Type of Involvement: 

The type of involvement is a strategic partnership, as Phoenix New Media holds the exclusive right to air and redistribute the content library of the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) as part of their overall video content library.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Dance Presentation Program: Support to Presenters

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Dance Section of the Canada Council for the Arts considers presenters of dance to be essential connectors in the Canadian dance ecology. The Dance Presentation Program offers financial support to organizations that present dance works to the Canadian public, with the aim of:

  • encouraging creative risk-taking in dance programming and creating a more dynamic environment for dance presentation in Canada;
  • contributing to the development and vitality of the art form;
  • extending, deepening and enriching existing relationships and cultivating new partnerships among local, national, and international artists and presenters;
  • increasing creation, performance and visibility opportunities for professional dance artists and companies; and
  • enhancing audience engagement and appreciation of dance.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/grants/find-a-grant/grants/dance-presentation-program-support-to-presenters

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Dance Presentation Program has six components: Foreign Artists’ Tours, Commissions/Co-productions, Creative Residencies, Visiting Dance Professionals, Choreographic Workshops/Labs and Strategic Collaborations.

The Foreign Artists’ Tour component provides support to Canadian presenters of dance that host a Canadian tour of a foreign artist, company or collective. Over 10 foreign professional artists were able to tour in Canada through support from this program between 2010 and 2014. Among them were artists from Cuba, South Africa, and Taiwan.

The Visiting Dance Professionals component provides support for Canadian presenters of dance to invite out-of-province, out-of-territory, or international dance professionals to facilitate workshops or conduct master classes for professional artists.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Dance Presentation Program is expected to help develop existing relationships and lead to new partnerships between Canadian and international artists and presenters by enabling Canadian presenters to invite foreign dancers to Canada. This will not only increase visibility and opportunities for foreign dancers, but also expose Canadian audiences to a greater variety of dance.

The goals of the program are to enhance programming options for Canadian presenters, encourage dialogue between members of the Canadian and international dance milieux, cultivate mutual exchange and collaboration between Canadian and foreign presenters, and ensure that international dance works are performed for the benefit of Canadian audiences.

As one example, in 2014, Vancouver-based presenter The Firehall Arts Centre coordinated a five-city tour of South African dance artist Vincent Mantsoe. The engagement reached multiple cities across Canada including Vancouver, Ottawa, Peterborough, Montreal and Toronto. Audience dialogue and talkback sessions were organized in Vancouver and Toronto, and special outreach was undertaken to reach the South African communities. This cross-Canada tour was important in offering Canadian audiences exposure to culturally diverse work. Amongst the Canadian presenters, Dance Immersion has a specific focus on dance from the African diaspora, and Montreal Arts Interculturels focuses on Indigenous and culturally diverse works. The other presenters are mainstream Western Contemporary presenters and this initiative diversified their programming.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total grant amount for Support to Presenters program in the 2013-14 fiscal year was $420 250 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Visiting Foreign Artists Program

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Visiting Foreign Artists program from the Canada Council for the Arts provides grants to Canadian professional arts organizations to encourage visits by individual professional foreign artists of outstanding achievement. Organizations may invite an individual artist from any foreign country.

The Visiting Foreign Artists Program assists arts organizations in welcoming artists from other countries to Canada. Successful projects demonstrate that there is a great advantage in looking at artistic and audience development in terms of exchange and reciprocity. The increased understanding of international perspectives that comes from cross-cultural artistic exchange is a wider cultural benefit of this program.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Under the Visiting Foreign Artists program, grants are available in fixed amounts which range from $500 to $3,000. While in Canada, the visiting foreign artist is to direct workshops, teach master classes for professional artists and/or – in the fields of inter-arts, media arts, visual arts, theatre, writing and publishing – give artist talks.

The following foreign artists were able to come to Canada through the support of the Visiting Foreign Artists Program:

- In 2012, Ola Khalidi, founder of Makan Space in Amman, Jordan, an independent contemporary art centre that encourages experimentation in concepts and production, presented to the Institutions by Artists: the Convention on the specific opportunities and challenges of artists’ self-organization practices in the Arab world. She also contributed to the Institutions by Artists book that was published leading up to the event in 2012.

- In September 2013, Shanghai artist Chen Hangfeng came to Canada for a two-week residency to present his Garden of Invasive Species at Gendai Gallery in Toronto. This project reflected on issues of immigration, politics and human dominance over nature.

- In June 2014, OBORO GOBORO in Montreal hosted Colombian multidisciplinary artist Waira Nina, in collaboration with OKINUM, to give a master class at OBORO, and to coincide with the 9th International Encuentro of Performance and Politics in the Americas.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/grants/find-a-grant/grants/visiting-foreign-artists-program

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Visiting Foreign Artists program is expected to help Canadian professional arts organizations to be able to host more foreign artists from a variety of countries, and to allow Canadians to learn from diverse artists who are outstanding in their fields.

The increased understanding of international perspectives that comes from cross-cultural artistic exchange is a wider cultural benefit of this program.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total grant amount for the Visiting Foreign Artists program in the 2013-14 fiscal year was $126 250 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Caribbean Cluster Initiative for Animation Outsourcing and Intellectual Property Development

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The objective of this measure is to build the capacity of the Caribbean Animation Cluster to deliver world class animation services, and in doing so, to establish the Caribbean as a competitive supplier of animation production and post-production services.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Regional Animation cluster (Barbados, Jamaica) of the Caribbean Cluster Initiative for Animation Outsourcing and Intellectual Property Development is a sub-project of Compete Caribbean. Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to firms and entrepreneurs to take a chance on an innovative, risky business idea in an attempt to improve the revenue performance and competitiveness of the firm. The program is jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and the Government of Canada.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected results of this measure are an increased capacity and capability of the cluster members to bid on international outsourcing animation projects, and increased activity in promoting and marketing their services globally.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Global Affairs Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total project cost is $630,800 USD (Compete Contribution: $500,000 USD).

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
Type of Entity: 
Private company
Type of Involvement: 

The involvement of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is financial, as well as strategic support.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Quebec: Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec agreements under the UNESCO- Aschberg program

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

From 1994 to 2014, the CALQ participated in the UNESCO-Aschberg program. This bursary program offered creation residencies in literature, music and visual arts to artists aged 25 to 35 in developing countries to give them the opportunity for personal growth through contact with other cultures. The program also helped facilitate the mobility and exchange of artists and cultural professionals in order to improve their expertise through training, exchanges and hospitality.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The CALQ participated in this program by providing grants to Quebec organizations that bring young artists on board. The CALQ notably associated itself with La Chambre blanche organization to support bringing artists from Francophone African countries on board for a residency in network and web arts production. The purpose of the artistic project was to explore the various possibilities of digital technologies, such as interactivity, participatory art, hyperlinks, sound exploration, processing still or moving images, etc.

From 2011 to 2014, Musique Multi Montréal, along with the Amis d’Ahuntsic-Cartierville (Babel Musique) also brought foreign artist on board as part of this program.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

As part of the UNESCO-Aschberg program, the CALQ supported Quebec organizations’ bringing on board seven foreign artists from 2011 to 2012 and 2014 to 2015.

In addition to that number, La Chambre blanche brought artists on board from Francophone African countries, including Cameroon and Burkina Faso. Musique Multi Montréal brought two artists on board from Togo and Madagascar. Babel Musique also brought one artist on board from Mexico.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
CALQ
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

2011-2013: $CAD 51,6K

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
La Chambre blanche
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Founded in 1978, La Chambre blanche is an artist-run centre with a mandate to promote experimentation and dissemination in the field of visual arts. More specifically, this mandate hinges around a reflection of installation and site-specific practices, within three avenues: dissemination, production and documentation. The centre has had its own artist-in-residence program since 1982.

Name: 
Musique Multi Montréal
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Musique Multi Montréal was founded in 1991 and its mandate is to make artists from here and elsewhere from all backgrounds known through a process to connect and mix cultures using music as a means of communication. In November 2013, the organization put a definitive end to its activities.

Name: 
Babel Musique
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Babel Musique was created to promote creation stemming from all the cultures of the world and to increase knowledge exchanges stemming from the world’s musical heritage. The organization is dedicated to developing music and its creators and produces its big Babel event annually, which encourages combining different styles, cultures and aesthetics. The organization is also partners with the Ahuntsic Cultural Centre, which is known in the country as a crossroad for the music of the world.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
No
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program from the Canada Council for the Arts encourages social and community environments that support the development of Aboriginal arts and artistic practices. It aims to foster unique artistic relationships and networks through inter-nation collaborative exchanges among Aboriginal artists, across all disciplines.

The objectives of this program are to:

  • ensure the transmission of artistic knowledge and expertise to cultivate the vitality of Aboriginal arts;
  • foster the development and ongoing skills enrichment of Aboriginal arts professionals;
  • encourage interaction and expertise-sharing between Canadian Aboriginal artists of various communities and also with international Indigenous communities; and
  • support the inter-nation and intergenerational transmission of Aboriginal artistic knowledge and expertise.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program provides support for Aboriginal artists to travel to other Aboriginal communities to collaborate in a traditional or contemporary artistic practice. This is a multidisciplinary program that is open to individual Aboriginal artists, arts groups, artists’ collectives and arts organizations.

In general terms, the program supports collaborations that are:

- Creative: Two artists or groups of artists creating a work together.

- Developmental: The development of artistic skills and techniques among participants, the advancement of traditional or contemporary artistic knowledge, and the formalized exploration of artistic themes.

- Exploratory and Research: Artistic research with Aboriginal communities to recover, examine, and authenticate traditional histories and artistic practices (while respecting each Aboriginal nation’s affirmed protocol).

One example of this program’s reach took place in 2011, when Iroquois Arts received a grant through the program to create new music in a workshop format with the Akamba Women Singers from Kyanzasu, Kenya.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/grants/find-a-grant/grants/aboriginal-peoples-collaborative-exchange-national-and-international-project-grants 

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program is expected to help create unique artistic relationships and networks through inter-nation collaborative exchanges among Aboriginal artists, across all artistic disciplines. Other expected results include:

  • The efficient transmission of artistic knowledge and expertise to cultivate the vitality of Aboriginal arts
  • The development and ongoing skills enrichment of Aboriginal arts professionals
  • Greater interaction and expertise-sharing between Canadian Aboriginal artists of various communities and also with international Indigenous communities
  • Better inter-nation and intergenerational transmission of Aboriginal artistic knowledge and expertise
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total grant amount for the Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program in the 2013-14 fiscal year was $235 400 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program was evaluated within a broader program evaluation of the Council’s suite of 15 Aboriginal Arts programs. This specific program was not evaluated individually. The conclusions were not specific to this program, but addressed questions about the entire suite of Aboriginal Arts programs.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Generally, for the evaluation of all Aboriginal Arts programs, the following relevant indicators were used:

  • Artists can better express their artistic and cultural identities.
  • Opportunities for artists to engage with communities are supported.
  • Communities hold events to showcase Aboriginal art.
  • Artists collaborate with other artists.
  • Artists participate in gatherings, festivals, and exchanges.
  • Artists have access to knowledge to support their practice.
  • Artists access skill development opportunities.
  • Works of art support cultural identity.
  • Career opportunities for Aboriginal artists are enhanced.
  • Artists collaborate with artists in other communities.
  • Aboriginal art in all forms is present in the public environment.
  • Arts organizations of all kinds engage with Aboriginal artists.
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

Tremplin NIKANIK program to assist First Nations francophone filmmakers

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) is a federal cultural agency within the portfolio of the Department of Canadian Heritage. Its mandate is to reflect Canadian values and perspectives through the production and distribution of innovative Canadian audiovisual works accessible in the relevant media of today. The Tremplin program was originally designed to help emerging filmmakers in francophone minority communities create a first or second professional documentary. The selected participants would benefit from professional guidance at each step of the production and would have access to the NFB’s expertise. The films produced were broadcast on Ici Radio-Canada Télé.

In 2012-13, the National Film Board expanded its Tremplin program to offer a pilot initiative specifically designed for First Nations francophone filmmakers in Quebec. Called Tremplin NIKANIK, this joint venture with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) aimed to give aspiring filmmakers the chance to make a short first or second documentary film, gain valuable hands-on screenwriting and production experience while working with respected industry professionals. The program was intended to increase opportunities for First Nations francophone filmmakers by providing them with an educational experience during which they could make key connections with members of the industry. As well, the documentary film created through participation in the Tremplin NIKANIK program would be broadcast across Canada by the APTN, which would expose the film to a wider audience and increase recognition for the filmmaker.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Tremplin NIKANIK was a contest for aspiring First Nations francophone filmmakers. It was composed of two stages: the first was the development stage, where candidates’ submissions were evaluated by a jury. The chosen candidates received a screenwriting contract from the Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinema (SARTEC) and spent two to four days in writing workshops. Candidates were then supported by a consultant for a period of seven to nine weeks while they developed their script. Following this, a finalist was chosen and proceeded to the production stage; their documentary was produced and distributed by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB), and was broadcast on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN).

For more information (in French only), please see: http://blogue.onf.ca/tremplin-nikanik/

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Tremplin NIKANIK competition was expected to add to the many works produced by the National Film Board with Aboriginal filmmakers and creators from all regions of the country, and strengthen the contribution being made by Aboriginal communities in the film sector by stimulating audiovisual creation and production.

After the first competition, the winning short documentary film “Le chemin rouge” was produced by the up-and-coming director, Thérèse Ottawa. The film was launched in 2015 at the Montréal First Peoples’ Festival. It was then presented at numerous festivals across Canada and the United States.

For more information, please see: https://www.nfb.ca/film/red_path/

 
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The National Film Board of Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The financial resources allocated to the competition were $70 500 CAD, and the production of the short documentary film cost $87 000 CAD.

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Aboriginal Peoples Television Network
Type of Entity: 
Private company
Type of Involvement: 

The APTN broadcast the winning documentary which was produced by the National Film Board of Canada as a result of the Tremplin NIKANIK program, allowing it to be seen by audiences across Canada. “Le chemin rouge” was broadcast on June 13th, 2016 by the APTN.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Local
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The NIKANIK competition was the subject of an internal evaluation. Although the first short documentary film produced through this program was presented at the main Aboriginal festivals (the Montréal First Peoples’ Festival and ImagiNATIVE in Toronto) and was broadcast by the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN), the initiative as a whole did not spark the recipient’s career, and the National Film Board’s objectives were not met.

The influence and range of the competition did not appear to be sufficient enough to renew it the following year. A new activity, bringing together seven Aboriginal artists from different nations, is in development and will be produced in November of 2017. The objective is to create a structuring initiative with more influence, and a range that goes beyond networks and events which are primarily linked to Aboriginal communities.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The indicators used to determine the impact were: the locations of the broadcast, the attracted audience, and the impact on the career of the director.

❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

National Forum on Literary Arts

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

To address the shifting literary landscape, in 2014 the Canada Council for the Arts worked with the literary community to create an unprecedented multisectoral and Canada-wide conversation about these changes: a National Forum on Literary Arts. The objectives of the Forum were to galvanize the literary arts community and its stakeholders around a shared vision, and to work on a blueprint for the future. Designed along the lines of a summit conference, the forum featured two days of meetings and discussions intended to work towards a positive vision for the future of Canadian literature. Its purpose was to better understand the ecology and unique challenges of the milieu and to allow the extended community to exchange best practices and ways forward.

The event was organized around four themes: creation, publication/production, dissemination and sustainability. The idea for the Forum arose out of the widely shared observation that the world of literature and publishing is far from immune to the upheavals caused by the current digital age. Neither fully understood nor integrated into the practices of the community, these changes, which are currently taking place to varying degrees, will intensify, making it a good time for the Canada Council and stakeholders to look at the questions raised by the changing dynamics of the Canadian literary milieu. For example: what does an author expect of her publisher today? How is access to books evolving with the technological revolution? How is the democratization of publishing seen? How are reading habits changing?

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/writing-and-publishing/national-forum-on-the-literary-arts

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

In mid-2013, the Canada Council assembled a Partners committee of provincial and territorial funding agencies and a Steering committee of 20 peers from the literary milieu, and hired two consultants to help manage the project. The Partners committee members were selected from the Canadian Public Arts Funders (CPAF) network. Their role was to provide advice and guidance on the Forum and to ensure that a broad range of delegates would participate. The Steering committee was tasked with setting the Forum’s objectives and devising the program, and worked diligently to develop the objectives and prepare the theme documents with the goal of sparking lively discussions at the Forum.

In February of 2014, some 250 people representing various sectors of the industry gathered in Montréal to develop a roadmap to respond to changes in the sector, identify future paths for sustainability and provide tools to adapt to new emerging models. The Forum was a valuable opportunity for participants to share their thoughts, ideas and questions about the future of the literary arts in Canada in stimulating and interactive sessions. There were two speakers, as well as roundtables on the themes of creation, production/publication, dissemination and sustainability.

After the Forum, the Canada Council presented its report and developed a plan for continuity and follow-up, so that ideas related to the themes and results can be shared to maintain an ongoing dialogue.

The summary report on the Forum may be accessed here: http://canadacouncil.ca/~/media/files/writing%20and%20publishing/national%20forum%20on%20the%20literary%20arts%20-%20report.pdf

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected result of the forum is that the literary community will unite around a shared vision and work on a blueprint for the future. The forum was seen as the first step in what is hoped to be an ongoing dialogue on the future.

For information see: http://canadacouncil.ca/~/media/files/writing%20and%20publishing/national%20forum%20on%20the%20literary%20arts%20-%20report.pdf

One of the main recommendations from the Forum was that the community was to continue the dialogue. In addition to some informal regional discussions, a notable follow-up to the National Forum was the Canadian Writers’ Summit, held June 15-19, 2016 in Toronto. This conference was jointly hosted by a cohort of Canadian writer organizations, which are listed at the following address: http://www.canadianwriterssummit.com/english/#/partners/. To continue the discussions from the National Forum, the summit programming included: professional development sessions, keynote talks, pedagogy and policy discussions, scholarly presentations, public lectures, and networking opportunities.

For more information, please see: http://www.canadianwriterssummit.com/english#/about/

 

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total cost of the National Forum on Literary Arts, not including the expenses for the Steering committee, was $270,488 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

The Year of the North

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

2012-13 was named the Year of the North by the National Arts Centre (NAC), and its initiatives focused on building upon already-established relationships with Northern Aboriginal artists and developing sustainable culture-sharing initiatives. The initiative celebrated the artistry and heritage of the extraordinary talent of Northern Canada by touring the North with the NAC Orchestra, by expanding the Music Alive educational program, and by staging the biggest showcase of Northern artists that Canada has ever seen during the Northern Scene festival.

The NAC Orchestra tour and the Music Alive program offered a many opportunities for the Orchestra to encounter promising young artists and to introduce them to incredible music teachers. The connections established during the Year of the North will lead to meaningful relationships that will continue for many years.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Year of the North included three activities: the continued expansion of the Music Alive educational program, a tour by the NAC Orchestra, and a festival to celebrate northern culture.

In 2010, the NAC’s Music Alive Program expanded to include remote communities in Nunavut, with a focus on developing long-term music education initiatives in three Qikiqtani communities: Iqaluit, Igloolik and Pangnirtung. The program also made an impact across communities of the Far North with workshops and training for young musicians, encouraging music-making and building students’ capacity to preserve northern music.

The NAC has developed strong relationships with northern artists, boards of education and communities. The partnerships forged have led to professional musicians working with youth, the donation of instruments to northern communities, community concerts showcasing northern musicians and celebrating Inuit music, music workshops for teachers-in-training, the funding of summer music camps and youth leadership summits, and distance-learning through broadband videoconference technology.

In 2012, the NAC Orchestra and guest artists toured for 10 days through rural communities in northern Canada. In advance of the tour, the NAC Orchestra received permission to transcribe ancient Inuit ayaya songs for Western instruments, which had been nearly forgotten during the time of assimilation policies and residential schools. The NAC helped to preserve Inuit music and highlighted its cultural value. The educational component of the tour included masterclasses, individual coaching, Q&A sessions, and workshops.

In 2013, the NAC hosted Northern Scene, a 10 day arts festival in the National Capital Region, featuring 355 diverse northern artists and art forms. It is hoped that the legacy of the festival will continue for many years to come.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

It is hoped that the initiative will help to preserve Inuit music and highlight its cultural value, as well as lead to a continued relationship between the National Arts Centre and northern Aboriginal communities.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The National Arts Centre
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

Culturat

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

CULTURAT is a widespread mobilization and sustainable development effort to significantly affect the Abitibi-Témiscamingue area with arts and culture, notably through:

1. the beautification of the area through art, flowers and green spaces;

2. bringing people together, notably through the social inclusion of Algonquin communities;

3. showcasing the area’s local products with a view of sustainable development;

4. highlighting culture through education authorities, notably by developing worksheets and workshops;

5. awareness of the business sector and the importance of culture and the arts;

6. promoting arts and culture in urban planning and managing public spaces marked by culture;

7. sharing information and knowledge, and inviting people to participate as citizens via the culturat.org website;

8. the mobilization of all the sectors around arts and culture with a view of sustainable development, notably through creating committees and advisory boards.

CULTURAT creates a strong synergy between culture and the other sectors (municipalities, businesses, cultural and tourist organizations, schools, Algonquin communities, media and citizens) which enables culture to become a significant factor in tourism, social, environmental and economic development in the region. By doing this, the attractiveness of the region is also going up for its citizens, tourists and those who have yet to arrive while strengthening residents’ attachment to the land and cultural diversity.

CULTURAT is in line with the principles of Agenda 21 for Culture and includes all community spheres to mark the area using arts and culture, as well as focus on cultural development to improve the quality of life.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Through CULTURAT, it was possible to implement tools to foster community understanding, adherence and action for this widespread movement based on sustainable development for the cultural sector:

- Designing the unique www.culturat.org website and having it go live to facilitate networking with the cultural sector (Répertoire des artistes et organismes);

- A list of 10 actions to be carried out under CULTURAT to all sectors of activity, a calendar of cultural activities in the area, models of contracts to hire local artists, guides, pricing charts, etc.;

- Signing the participation charter, which marks the commitment of 53 municipalities (out of 65 in the region), along with all the Algonquin communities chambers of commerce in the region, as well as several organizations;

- Support the creation of local committees through CULTURAT in certain municipalities in the region to make it easier to carry out projects based on arts and culture;

- Encourage citizen participation through a “Participe au décor” outdoor space beautification contest;

- Campaign to promote the process with citizens in the region in order to position the movement. By wearing blue, people are visually showing that they adhere to CULTURAT;

- Campaign to promote cultural tourist attractions and invite citizens from the region to take advantage of these sites;

- “Mon été CULTURAT” contest with citizens in the region, with the goal of discovering the region’s cultural products;

- Creation of an Anicinabe cultural circle with the goal of uniting the seven communities in the area to make known and showcase the Anicinabe culture;

- Establishing the Fonds CULTURAT pour la ruralité to allow the rural areas to promote artistic and cultural activity in the area by professional artists.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Thanks to CULTURAT, a widespread mobilization effort has begun, a communal action strategy between municipalities and the area has been developed, and many sectors of society have become involved, all while integrating arts and culture into the various areas of life. The ultimate objective is to mark the area with arts and culture in both rural and urban sections. The following aspects have been noted:

- an increase and improvement in cultural tourism activities;

- increased visibility for the region;

- increased “positive” media coverage by establishing a community strategy based on mobilization;

- stronger Aboriginal presence in Algonquin communities in carrying out CULTURAT projects;

- a contribution to pride in Anicinabe culture by showcasing it

- strong ties to the area by the resident population and training cultural ambassadors;

- stronger presence in social networks and on the regional products website;

- a more flowery and welcoming environment.

 

In terms of cross-sectoral impacts, CULTURAT:

- encourages cultural diversity by better integration of Algonquin community members in the cultural dynamism of the region;

- helps to improve the quality of life;

- maintains environmental integrity through beautification and flowers;

- encourages municipalities to join in citizen participation, along with public and private cultural development partners;

- helps to strengthen ties between culture and education;

- population retention because of the region’s increased attractiveness for tourists;

- accentuates sustainable development by encouraging local purchases.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The material, financial and human resources allocated to the mobilization of Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue has grown to nearly $CAD 700,000 since 2012. These amounts do not include the works of art on buildings that belong to businesspeople, or even green spaces in municipalities. Furthermore, sponsorships from local media (newspaper, television, radio) allow us to reach every home, and thus far, the amount has increased to over $600,000.

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue (TAT)
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue (TAT) is a not-for-profit corporation that acts as the main coordinator of the CULTURAT project, notably providing the development officer on duty as well as the marketing team and communication strategy teams about the project. TAT also creates links as needed to encourage cooperation in the community by acting as a facilitator.

Development consultations for open spaces, events and festivals, cultural tourism, hospitality and snowmobiling are working with peers in each sector as well as the various related organizations to develop quality, competitive products in addition to promoting the touristic product of Abitibi-Témiscamingue outside the region.

Name: 
Le Conseil de la culture de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue (CCAT)
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Conseil de la culture de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue (CCAT) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to regional cultural development. As part of CULTURAT, the CCAT acts as a key stakeholder in culture, provides networking tools (cultural calendar, artists directory, art boutiques, etc.), promotes these efforts with its members and shares its cultural expertise. Many other organizations also actively participate in this process, notably the five chambers of commerce in the region and the school boards.

Name: 
53 municipalities and 7 signatory communities
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The 53 municipalities and 7 communities that signed for their areas work together on the CULTURAT project. They are leaders in the field and in turn will encourage many partners’ adherence to the project. By signing the charter, they committed to carrying out actions to work towards the objectives of the process. They are also, in many cases, providing additional funds to carry out special projects under CULTURAT.

 

The MCC is participating financially in the process to document it, while the Ministry de Tourisme agreed to prioritize cultural tourism development in Abitibi-Témiscamingue under the Entente de partenariat régional en tourisme 2012-2015. Members of both Parliament and Provincial Parliament also support this process.

 

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Under the recommendation of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, a partnership was established between Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue and the Université du Québec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue to scientifically document CULTURAT and notably make it easier to analyze and improve it. These documentation efforts on the origins and implementation of CULTURAT did not undergo formal evaluation, however.

Administrators are currently involved in strategic planning to ensure the continuity of this process, which will have to involve a more structured analytical review on the actions carried out thus far.

After CULTURAT has been implemented for a few years, it is obvious that local governments will mobilize around culture to increase synergy, empowerment and the combined effort of many stakeholders in the area to better draw on the regions’ cultural assets. CULTURAT ensures that small communities have better management over their own cultural resources by compensating for the lack of cultural policies and isolation. Furthermore, an increased quality of life has a direct influence on the region’s attractiveness and retention capacity—two major factors for local governments that are currently experiencing closures of many regional and municipal bodies.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Professionalization of artists:

By encouraging networking between the world of arts and culture and other sectors (economic – business, tourism, academia, Aboriginal, municipal, etc.) CULTURAT is directly contributing to the professionalization of artists and the development of work opportunities through better knowledge of the cultural sector.

 

Number of projects carried out:

Over 100 projects have been carried out with professional artists, and this also provides the opportunity for better retention of artists in the region, even though the area is quite removed from large cultural centres.

 

Improving quality of life:

By making the area stand out through an artistic arrangement and stimulating the community in a very particular way, CULTURAT is actively participating in improving citizens’ quality of life.

 

Intraregional promotion:

The intraregional promotion of CULTURAT allows residents to have a better overall view of what is going on in their area and a better understanding of their cultural assets, thereby increasing their feeling of belonging, rootedness and pride.

This is a series of indicators that university researchers can use at a later date to determine the actual impact.

❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF), provided by the Government of Canada, seeks to contribute to the improvement of physical conditions for the arts and heritage related to creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The CCSF also aims to increase and improve access for Canadians to performing arts, visual arts, media arts, and to museum collections and heritage exhibitions. The goal of the CCSF is to provide Canadians in all regions, including underserved communities, with access to new or improved arts and heritage spaces in their communities for creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The CCSF provides grants and contributions for arts and heritage infrastructure projects across the country to improve facilities and infrastructure requirements for the arts and heritage.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

To achieve its objectives, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF) provides financial assistance in the form of grants and contributions for construction and renovation projects, specialized equipment purchases and feasibility studies for professional, not-for-profit arts and heritage infrastructure projects.

In 2014-15, the CCSF supported 73 projects in 42 communities. Examples of these projects include the expansion of the Musée d'Histoire, d'Ethnographie et d'Art Religieux de Nicolet (Québec), the acquisition of specialised equipment for Théâtre de la Pire Espèce in Montréal, Québec, improvements to the Ontario Jewish Archives Foundation, and the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation's video archive project in Iqaluit, Nunavut. As well, the CCSF was used to support the Surrey Art Gallery's Urban Screen in British Columbia. This 30 metre by 10 metre screen uses projectors mounted on re-purposed towers to project digital art onto the side of a building, and is viewed by up to 30,000 people daily as they enter and exit Surrey's SkyTrain station.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected result of the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund is that arts and heritage organizations in communities across Canada, including rural communities, will have the necessary resources to build and improve cultural facilities and infrastructure. Improved facilities are a sustainable way to ensure that all communities have spaces in which to promote and appreciate culture, both in the present day and for years to come.

In 2014-15, 66% of approved projects targeted at least one underserved community. In particular, 20.5% of supported organizations served Aboriginal communities, 26% served ethnocultural communities, 9.6% served official language minority communities, and 46.6% served young audiences.

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

In 2014-15, budgetary financial resources for the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund totalled $28,587,103 CAD.

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation focused on the period from 2007-08 to 2012-13 was conducted for three programs, including the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF). The core issues addressed were: relevance and continued need, alignment with government priorities and with federal roles and responsibilities; and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy.

The CCSF has contributed to new and improved arts and heritage facilities and infrastructure across a variety of disciplines and a range of communities. An average of 97 projects were funded per year, which resulted in improved access to, and quality of, a variety of arts and heritage experiences for Canadians. About half of the 63 communities that receive CCSF funding in an average year are rural or remote.

The evaluation found that the CCSF has contributed to new and improved arts and heritage facilities and infrastructure across a variety of disciplines and communities. The regional presence of Canadian Heritage contributes to the success of the program by facilitating understanding of local needs and demands as well as the development of close collaborations with regional partners. The major findings of the evaluation regarding the CCSF are as follows:

  • Between 2007-08 and 2011-12, 487 cultural infrastructure projects were funded which resulted in new or improved arts facilities (an average of 97 projects per year). The number of projects funded was higher in 2009-10 (134), compared to other years, due to the additional funding received through Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
  • The projects funded under the CCSF consist of construction and renovation projects, specialized equipment projects, and feasibility studies.
  • For 2010-11 and 2011-12, construction and renovation projects accounted for 43% of the projects and 72% of the funding awarded while specialized equipment projects and feasibility studies for prospective construction or renovation projects accounted for 57% of the projects and 28% of the funding awarded.
i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

A variety of arts and heritage experiences are available in a wide range of communities:

  • Diversity of supported projects (artistic disciplines, heritage function, underserved communities)
  • Funded projects service communities in all regions that vary in size

Arts and Heritage organizations can better create, present, preserve, and exhibit arts and heritage experiences:

  • Number and nature of activities have been maintained and/or enhanced (number, quality, variety, self-reported)

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-PCH2-PCH-InstitutionalProfile/STAGING/texte-text/2014_Grouped_Arts_Evaluation_1453817656247_eng.pdf

 
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL

Quebec: Agenda 21 for Culture for Quebec: international component

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Internationally, the theme of integrating culture with sustainable development is inciting more and more interest. Many organizations, including UNESCO, UCLG and the IOF are interested in this issue. In Quebec, the implementation of Agenda 21 for Culture (A21C) hinges on an international component with the aim of recognizing the importance and the role of culture in sustainable development internationally.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Quebec has participated in several international events to make known the importance of integrating culture into sustainable development, in addition to its efforts.

For example:

  • On November 22 and 23, 2012, the French and Quebec ministries of culture came together to organize the International Symposium in Paris: Culture and Sustainable Development (link available in French only). The objective of the Symposium was to present international thinking and identify courses of action (link available in French only) to promote better integration of culture in sustainable development initiatives. The Symposium was open to the public, and in total over 330 artists, researchers, experts, cultural and sustainable development professionals, policy makers and representatives of international organizations attended to align thinking and action in order to highlight innovative practices, create new partnerships and reflect on strategies for better acknowledgment and to establish a more concrete link between culture and sustainable development.
  • The Ville de Montréal participated in holding a debate on culture and development at the United Nations (UN) General Assembly in New York in June 2013.
  • During a special demonstration organized by the IOF and UNESCO in New York on May 6, 2014 with the theme of culture as the economic driving force behind development: experience and success, the Government of Quebec presented the A21C and the initial results of the Chantier gouvernemental en culture.
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Recognition of the importance of the role culture plays in sustainable development.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MRIF, the MCC and cities in Quebec who are active internationally are responsible for implementing this measure.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL

CARICOM Education for Employment Program (C-EFE)

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The purpose of the CARICOM Education for Employment Program is to support the economic development of the Caribbean region through the strengthening of its technical and vocational education and training system, which includes building skills for employment. One of the sub-programs being developed is a two year Associate Degree Level III program in the cultural/creative industries, which will be used by colleges across the Caribbean region.

This program is part of Canada’s overarching objective for the Caribbean Region in promoting sustainable economic growth, through:

  • Strengthening the management of public financial resources, including debt management;
  • Increasing access to employment skills for youth;
  • Strengthening the productivity of small and medium-sized enterprises and increasing participation in regional and global markets;
  • Promoting public-private partnerships that generate employment and attract investment for growth; and
  • Creating an enabling and predictable environment for economic growth through increased capacity and accountability of public institutions and by fostering a more competitive private sector.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Education for Employment Program is an institutional partnership between the T.A. Marryshow Community College in Grenada and the Nova Scotia Community College in Canada.

Funded by Global Affairs Canada and managed by the Association of Canadian Community Colleges, this measure provides support to the T.A. Marryshow Community College to help develop a two year Associate Degree Level III program in the cultural/creative industries. Support includes curriculum development and teacher training to deliver competency based training. A second institution, Garmex HEART Academy in Jamaica, will also benefit from this partnership. The resulting Associate Degree program will be eligible for Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ). When approved as a CVQ, the curriculum can be used by any community college in the region to offer a similar program. 

In 2014, the Caribbean Regional Development Program was confirmed as a country/region of focus for the Government of Canada's international development efforts. Canada supports the development agenda established by CARICOM to achieve regional cooperation and integration.

Fourteen countries in total – 11 island states (Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago) and three continental ones (Belize, Guyana, and Suriname) – are served by Canada's Caribbean Program under which this measure was developed.

Canada's long-term goal in the Caribbean region is to help build a more prosperous and integrated Caribbean community, one that is able to generate sustainable economic growth.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Education for Employment Program is expected to contribute to an increase in the economic development of the Caribbean region through the strengthening of its technical and vocational education and training system, including skills for employment.

For example, the Caribbean Program’s achievements for 2012-13 with respect to economic growth include:

  • Supporting improvements in public institutions, which helped two out of six countries complete medium-term debt management strategies and trained 64 Caribbean workers in loan negotiations.
  • Supporting and financing the first-ever inclusion of the Caribbean in the World Bank’s “Enterprise Surveys”, the results of which provided policymakers with previously unavailable data on the state of doing business in the Caribbean.
  • Improving the access to finance among micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) by providing technical assistance to the Institute of Private Enterprise Development, the largest microfinance institution in Guyana.
  • Providing technical assistance in support of legislative reform and institutional strengthening related to public-private partnerships.
  • Providing funding for 13 public-private dialogue events in the region with a focus on challenges to growth and on ways to overcome them.
  • Playing an instrumental role in the development of the new CARICOM Regional Strategy for Technical Vocational Education and Training for Economic Competitiveness and Workforce Development.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Global Affairs Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

CDN $440,000 from Global Affairs Canada and CDN $172,000 from the Nova Scotia Community College.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b

Canada Council for the Arts’ Deaf and disability arts strategy: Expanding the Arts 2012

Context of the measure: 
EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The barriers which may prevent Deaf Canadians and Canadians with disabilities from equally engaging in the arts are complex, systemic and diverse. Lack of access, whether it is physical, sensory or in decision-making, is a connected yet separate issue from promoting and recognizing Deaf arts or disability arts. Furthermore, promoting and ensuring equal opportunities for Deaf Canadians or Canadians with disabilities to engage in the arts is an issue which is directly influenced, affected by and dependent on the entire arts ecology.

Expanding the Arts is a strategy created by the Canada Council for the Arts which aims to develop better internal processes and measures to counter systemic barriers experienced by Deaf artists and artists with disabilities and those working in deaf arts and disability arts sectors. These processes also aim to advance the Council’s knowledge of the diverse Deaf arts and disability arts communities, artistic practices and changes in these milieux. Furthermore, this strategy aims to foster and promote greater opportunities for Canadians who are Deaf or who have disabilities to enjoy and engage in the arts.

The Canada Council has a history of embedding values of equity within its operations. The practice of linguistic duality, the investment in regional artistic institutions, the creation of the Aboriginal Arts and Equity Offices, as well as equitable practices within policy development, grant programs and processes, have all contributed to its diverse and vital arts ecology. The Council has equity policies that cross the whole organization as well as dedicated programs for arts communities facing sizable barriers to arts production and access.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/research/find-research/2012/expanding-the-arts-deaf-and-disability-arts

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

In keeping with the Canada Council’s commitment to equity, diversity and inclusive policies, it was determined that developing a strategy on Deaf and disability arts specific to the Canada Council was a priority. The strategy provides definitions, background and context, including Canadian and international legislation, and information about the Council’s consultation process.

To achieve its objectives, the strategy prioritizes three main focus areas, with specific goals for each area:

1. Increasing access, support and participation in Canada Council programs

- The Council and its programs are accessible to artists, arts professionals and arts organizations.

- Deaf people and people with disabilities participate and are supported throughout the Council, and its staff is comfortable and conversant with access support and protocols.

2. Recognizing, supporting and promoting Deaf and disability arts

- The artistic practices of Deaf artists and artists with disabilities are supported and advanced through Canada Council programs.

- Increased opportunities to Deaf artists and artists with disabilities in arts organizations.

- Knowledge and social discourse are raised on the topics of Canadian Deaf and disability arts.

3. Encouraging the public engagement of Canadians who are Deaf or who have disabilities in arts and culture

- Increased engagement in the arts for Canadians who are Deaf or who have disabilities. 

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/research/find-research/2012/expanding-the-arts-deaf-and-disability-arts

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Expanding the Arts is an important step forward for the Canada Council for the Arts in terms of reaching its overarching commitment to contribute to, advance and support a vital and diverse arts ecology. Through this strategy, the Council will be better able to recognize and serve the breadth of Canada’s artistic communities, and remove barriers to arts funding support. Ultimately this will ensure that Council funding gives maximum impact and value to all Canadians.

There have already been successful partnerships between the Canada Council and artists who are Deaf or who have disabilities, allowing these artists to successfully apply for and receive funding for their projects. For example, in 2014 a unique arts organization called “Spill” (“Propagation” in French) from Gatineau, Québec, received Council support for a five-day forum hosted by internationally-renowned artist Jolanta Lapiak. The forum’s objective was to identify and construct a new art practice from the perspective of Deaf people. Spill also received support from the Council’s Leadership for Change program to do research to strengthen its organizational model.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Between 2011 and 2014 the Council awarded a total of $1,992,989 CAD in grants to Deaf and disability arts organizations and individuals. In addition, $284,082 CAD was awarded in access support, which was identified as a strategic priority in the Expanding the Arts strategy. Access support is a supplement provided to successful grant recipients who are Deaf or have disabilities and who identify specific access requirements which are related to barriers faced in their proposed artistic activities and/or as part of travel. The purpose is to assist arts professionals who have access-related needs to complete their proposed activity.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b

CBC/Radio-Canada: National public broadcasting in the digital age

Context of the measure: 
EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Conventional broadcasting is in flux as audience behaviours, advertising models and methods of production shift quickly. The profile of the industry is also changing: availability of foreign content is exploding; technology is transforming the industry; and consumer expectations, habits and demographics are transforming the marketplace.

CBC/Radio-Canada is the national public broadcaster. It operates television, radio and online media services, delivering predominantly Canadian content in English, French, eight aboriginal languages and its international service in five languages. Public broadcasting continues to play a crucial role in Canada and around the world. CBC/Radio-Canada invests a greater percentage in Canadian content compared to the largest private‐sector Canadian broadcasters, in this way providing a home for the creation and discovery of Canadian content.

Launched in June 2014, CBC/Radio-Canada’s 2020 strategy A Space for Us All is designed to provide the national public broadcaster with the agility and stability needed to navigate a rapidly evolving media environment. The strategy aims to position CBC/Radio-Canada to thrive now, as well as in an age beyond traditional broadcasting. A Space for Us All includes four objectives:  

  • Through distinctive content, increase and deepen engagement with Canadians, and inspire them to participate in the public space.
  • Change the infrastructure to allow increased simplicity, flexibility, scalability, and collaboration.
  • Build a culture of collaboration, accountability, boldness, action, and agility, with a workforce that reflects the country.

Achieve sustainable financial health, including the ability to invest in the future.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The plan A Space for Us All focuses on the following elements:

1. More digital

Currently, television and radio platforms are the primary focus. By 2020, CBC/Radio-Canada will transform the way it is delivering its services to maximize engagement and modernize its offering. It will continue supporting conventional services and the audiences and revenues it currently attracts, while also shifting to mobile and digital platforms in terms of resources, audiences and revenues. 

2. More local

The strategy aims to maintain existing geographic presence and evolve CBC/Radio-Canada’s service by offering content specific to the needs of each region. It intends to provide more local information, using digital technology to make it affordable and timely. As part of the Corporation’s digital strategy, it has shifted its focus to deliver local content through mobile and web platforms first, then radio, then television. In this way, local services can be tailored to the specific size and needs of each community.

3. More distinctively Canadian

CBC/Radio-Canada believes that “programming needs to be contemporary and distinctly Canadian. Entertainment content will be a significant area of increased investment. Prime‐time entertainment titles are the biggest drivers of audience and revenue on conventional television. They are powerful vectors of culture and help create a shared national identity. They also have the best chance of becoming breakout hits, which then drive consumption of non‐news content on digital platforms.”

For more information, please see: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/_files/cbcrc/documents/explore/transforming/a-space-for-us-all-summary-v12-en.pdf

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Corporation’s strategy will reduce fixed costs and shift investments from support services, real estate and traditional broadcast infrastructure, to providing high‐impact Canadian content, including news and entertainment, progressively adapting to audience preferences through an even greater focus on digital and mobile across all genres.

CBC/Radio-Canada will fulfil its mandate by accelerating a fundamental transformation that will make it more scalable and sustainable; and in so doing, able to better withstand the challenges that lie ahead and take advantage of opportunities as they emerge.

CBC/Radio-Canada has set for itself two goals that symbolize the ambition of A Space for Us All:

  • By 2020, CBC/Radio-Canada will have doubled its digital reach. One out of two Canadians, 18 million in total, will use its digital services each month.
  • By 2020, three out of four Canadians will answer that they have a strong attachment to their public broadcaster.

For more information, please see: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/_files/cbcrc/documents/strategy2020/public-space-jan2016-short-version.pdf

 
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/Société Radio-Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b

Quebec: Digital technologies

Context of the measure: 
EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

b. Key Objectives of the Measure (max 2100 characters)

The Government of Quebec has given several presentations at international forums, including the IOF and UNESCO, so that the impact of digital technologies is taken into consideration in the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions.

In April 2015, the MCC, in collaboration with the MRIF, implemented a working group on digital technologies and the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions with the purpose of:

  • documenting the issues, challenges and opportunities for Quebec represented by the impact of digital technologies of the diversity of cultural expressions;
  • establishing Quebec’s position in relation to the issue of operational directives on digital technologies, including their possible content, format and relevance;
  • reviewing any other legal or non-legal instrument that could be adopted by Convention representatives to adjust to the implementation of the Convention in a digital environment;
  • sharing Quebec’s good practices and expertise in the cultural and digital sector with UNESCO.

Taking the new digital reality into consideration is at the heart of many of the MCC’s interventions, along with those of state-owned enterprises who work in the cultural sector (Télé-Québec, the SODEC, BAnQ, CALQ, etc.). Interministerial collaborations are also being established on this issue, notably with the MRIF.

 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
Regional
National
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan (QDCP) was launched in 2014. It included over 50 measures for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. QDCP helps cultural environments go digital so that Quebec continues to count on this significant support for its economy and remain competitive in international markets.

At the same time, the web magazine, video distribution channel and specialized cultural network (La Fabrique culturelle [available in French only]) launched by Télé-Québec in 2014 is also a tool for showcasing Quebec culture.

Until 2012-2013, the CALQ offered the digital platforms and networks measure with the goal of implementing digital networks and platforms to build partnerships and support the emergence of projects. In 2014-2015, this measure was replaced by three measures included in QDCP:

  • support for the creation and development of original, digital, cultural content, notably to foster the creation of original artistic content on La Fabrique culturelle;
  • support for digitizing artistic and literary content so that organizations can digitize, disseminate and make more online content available.
  • Support for the deployment of digital infrastructures that notably promotes pooling resources and expertise.

The SODEC implemented a digital/interactive advisory committee including representatives of businesses or organizations that work in the digital sector to receive information on community needs while programs related to digital technologies are developed.

BAnQ designed a web portal (available in French only) that provides access to digitized heritage documents from national libraries that are members of the RFN.

One of the objectives of Agenda 21 for Culture for Quebec (link available in French only) is to develop and promote creativity by integrating culture into innovation policies and facilitating the arts, literature and cultural industries sector’s adjustment to the Internet and the new digital reality.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Not available.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MCC, CALQ, SODEC, BAnQ and Télé-Québec are responsible for implementing these measures.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY

Quebec: 2.6.1 2011-2015 Government Action Plan on Gender Equality

Context of the measure: 
CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The 2011-2015 Government Action Plan on Gender Equality stems from the 2006 policy for gender equality entitled Turning Equality in Law into Equality in Fact. The Plan includes 26 ministries and organizations, as well as nine collaborating ministries and organizations and 102 actions that fall under seven broad guidelines. Half of those guidelines are in keeping with the previous 2007 action plan, while the other half are new. The Secrétariat à la condition féminine (SCF) is responsible for coordinating follow-up on the implementation of the policy and action plan.

The purpose of this plan is notably to promote egalitarian models and behaviour, to move towards achieving gender equality in the economic arena as well as greater participation by women in decision-making bodies and gender equality in all areas, based on their specific circumstances.

The 2011–2015 Action Plan on Gender-based Analysis (link available in French only) is used as a governing instrument. The objective of gender-based analysis is to integrate gender equality concerns into their ways of doing things and decisions made by government authorities.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
Regional
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Several measures included in the 2011-2015 Governmental Action Plan are directly or indirectly related to culture. The following are examples of some of the measures:

  • Measure 4: Make a directory of cultural-educational resources free of sexual and sexist stereotypes available to specialists and resource persons: the purpose of this measure is to ensure that the Répertoire de ressources culture-éducation offers young people in elementary and secondary school cultural activities that are free of sexual or sexist stereotypes.
  • Measure 17: Annually disseminate a cultural piece for creators to promote equal models and behaviour: the purpose of this measure is to encourage artists from various sectors to create a work of art to convey egalitarian behaviour and models and then disseminate those works of art throughout the population and to targeted groups of young people.
  • Measure 89: Achieve parity among women and men on the boards of directors of state-owned enterprises and ensure that parity is maintained: the objective of this measure is to ensure compliance with the Act respecting the governance of state-owned enterprises, which set the deadline to achieve parity among men and women on boards of directors for all state-owned enterprises for December 14, 2011, and that also stipulated that this parity must be maintained from that date forward.
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The following results were achieved for each of the measures. For full results, see the report on the Government Action Plan on Gender Equality (available in French only).

Measure 4:

  • A gender-based analysis of cultural activities for young people in the Répertoire de ressources culture-éducation was carried out;
  • A new evaluation criterion was introduced for artists’ and writer’s projects in order to offer activities free of sexual or sexist stereotypes;
  • The jury took this criterion into consideration in their work.

Measure 17:

  • 17 pieces on the theme of gender equality were disseminated as part of the L’égalité à l’œuvre competition, including 11 two-dimensional pieces, three short films and three songs.

Measure 89:

  • In 2012, of the 60 large corporations targeted by the strategy, women made up 18.8% of boards of directors, while in 2013, women represented 20.2% of those boards. Those corporations notably included the CALQ and BAnQ.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The SCF, MCC, MEES, Ministère des Finances du Québec and the Secrétariat aux emplois supérieurs are responsible for implementing this measure.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY

Commitment from the National Film Board of Canada that 50 percent of its production budget will go to films directed by women

Context of the measure: 
CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

On March 8, 2016, the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) announced that it will be ensuring that over the next three years, half of its productions will be directed by women and half of all production spending will be allocated to films directed by women.

In making this commitment, the NFB is working toward growing the number of women in Canadian media, both on-screen and behind the scenes, and building on its leadership role in women’s cinema in Canada.

The issue of gender equality in film has been a longstanding issue within the industry. For instance, the non-for-profit organization Women in View released a 2015 report that stated that, in the Canadian film industry, only 17 percent of directors, 22 percent of writers, and 12 percent of cinematographers were women in a sample of 91 feature films made in 2013 to 2014.

For more information, please see: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/en/press-room/press-releases-media-kits/?idpres=21439

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

This commitment will be integrated over the next three years to ensure that gender equality is established as the status quo by 2019. This will involve the implementation of tools to monitor and track gender representation in all National Film Board of Canada (NFB) projects in 11 studios, including an internal process to keep track of gender in all key positions (director, writer, producer, editor, and director of photography). All recorded information will be posted annually on the NFB website to ensure transparency and accountability.

The NFB's spending for the 2015-16 fiscal year was for 43.4 percent of productions directed by women and 43.5 percent for films directed by men (with 11.3 percent for mixed-gender teams and 1.8 percent not allocated). Those numbers for women were up from the previous year (2014-15) which was 41.7 percent for women and 47.8 for men.

Currently, fifty-five percent of the NFB’s producers and executive producers are women, with 66 percent of upper management and 70 percent of NFB board of trustee positions held by women.

Among the diverse films produced by the NFB, some of its notable films by female filmmakers include, but are not limited to, Sarah Polley’s ‘Stories We Tell', Alanis Obomsawin’s ‘Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance’, and Mina Shum’s ‘Ninth Floor’. This effort is a contemporary extension of the NFB’s pioneering Studio D efforts in 1974, which devoted itself to films by women. New female-directed films coming up soon from the NFB include Alethea Arnaquq-Baril’s ‘Angry Inuk’, Andrea Dorfman’s ‘160 Girls’, and Ann Marie Fleming’s ‘Window Horses’.

For its next periodic report in 2020, Canada will report back and provide further information on the implementation of this newly announced measure.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The result expected from this commitment is that the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) will achieve gender parity in its productions and in the allocation of its production spending. The NFB reported that in 2016-17, the numbers are projected to be well above that. However it recognized that numbers can fluctuate as there have been good years and lean years for women’s filmmaking at the NFB.  The ongoing commitment to full gender parity announced by the NFB is also designed to help to lead the way for the film industry as a whole. For its next periodic report in 2020, Canada will report back and provide further information on the implementation of this newly announced measure.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
National Film Board of Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ YOUTH

BC Creative Futures Strategy: Creative Youth Initiatives

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Announced in January 2013, the BC Creative Futures Strategy was designed to develop and support BC’s next leaders in the creative economy by exposing school-aged children to creative activities and works, providing on-the-job skills and training in the creative sector and increasing youth engagement in the arts. The Creative Futures Strategy has three central goals: to increase skills training and participation in the creation, exhibition and performance of various art forms, to increase opportunities for engagement with art, and to increase opportunities to train and work alongside creative professionals.

The first part of the strategy is Arts Engagement for Creativity, a package of programs intended to support and assist youth and art students, with the goal of encouraging engagement in the arts and the growth of creative thinking in young people. The second part of the strategy is the establishment of Creative BC, an independent agency that is responsible for promoting the development of creative industries in British Columbia. The adoption of this cross-sectoral approach will encourage growth by creating a climate for business development and sustainability. The third part of the strategy, a one-time investment of $113 million to support a new state-of-the-art facility at the Emily Carr College of Art and Design, is also a part of the BC Jobs Plan, and is intended to help build on the province’s national and international reputation as a leader in media, creative arts and design. The expansion supports the BC government’s long term commitment to the arts and ensures that future generations have a place to hone their creative talents.

For more information, please see: https://archive.news.gov.bc.ca/releases/news_releases_2009-2013/2013CSCD0006-000156.htm

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Creative Futures Strategy consists of three parts:

1. Arts Engagement for Creativity

This is a $6.25 million package of new and expanded existing programs delivered by the BC Arts Council (BCAC), an independent agency supporting artists and cultural organizations, and the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development (MCSCD), which includes:

  • Creative Youth Initiatives – $2 million (BCAC)
    • The Youth Engagement Program supports innovative and inspiring approaches to actively engaging British Columbia’s young people with professional arts and cultural organizations and their programming.
    • The Early-Career Development Program helps bridge the gap for emerging and early career arts practitioners by providing support to build portfolio, professional exposure and/or career experience through co-op placement, internship, residency, and mentorship opportunities.
  • The After School Sport and Arts Initiative – $1 million (MCSCD)
  • Artists in Education Program – $1 million (BCAC)
  • Co-op Placement Program – $1 million (BCAC)
  • Scholarship Program – $750,000 (BCAC)
  • Artists in the Classroom Program – $500,000 (BCAC)

2. Strategic Vision – Creative BC (April 2013)

The establishment of Creative BC: an independent, non-profit society to engage government and the creative industries in a fresh partnership, and to provide a single point of access for industry professionals. Creative BC builds on existing government and industry partnerships in the creative sector.

For more information, please see: http://www.creativebc.com/

3. Support for Expansion at Emily Carr University of Art + Design

A total of $113 million was announced to help build a new visual, media and design facility at Emily Carr University of Art + Design's Great Northern Way Campus to ensure that future generations have a place to hone their creative talents.

For more information, please see: http://www.ecuad.ca/

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The BC Creative Futures Strategy is expected to spur further growth in British Columbia’s creative economy by supporting artists from a young age and enabling them to pursue a career in the arts. The long-term outcome of the strategy is expected to create a strong knowledge-based industry that values creativity and innovation, and that will support the success of the BC Jobs Plan. The strategy will lead to sustainable, long-term success for British Columbia’s creative sector. For example, since the introduction of Creative Futures:

- The number of students exposed to the arts through Artists in the Classroom has increased from 3,000 to over 15,000.

- According to the 2015 annual report by the Directorate of Agencies for School Health BC, the After School Sport and Arts Initiative has expanded to 181 schools with 6,715 unique participants.

- Since 2013-14, a total of 206 Early Career Development awards have been distributed.

- The British Columbia Arts Council has supported a series of youth engagement projects through unique relationships with arts and cultural organizations.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development
The British Columbia Arts Council
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

A total of $119.25 million CAD has been allocated to the implementation of this measure. $6.25 million has been assigned to Part One on an annual basis; of this total amount, $5.25 million will be contributed by the British Columbia Arts Council, and $1 million will be contributed by the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development. Emily Carr University was assigned a total of $113 million, provided by the Government of British Columbia.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ YOUTH

Quebec: Youth - Education and Culture

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Quebec’s 1992 Cultural Policy made establishing links between education and culture a paramount objective. One of the guidelines is to improve arts and culture awareness and education. School is identified as an excellent way to access culture.

The Protocole d’entente interministériel Culture-Éducation, which unites the MEES and the MCC, stems from the Cultural Policy. The protocol was signed in 1997 and updated in 2013. Its purpose is to strengthen collaboration in school and cultural settings as well as integrate culture into school.

Colleges also contribute to developing Quebec’s cultural potential by the training professional development courses they offer in artistic and cultural fields. The internationalization of Quebec students’ training is supported through the Artistic and cultural college training international exchange support program (link available in French only), which offers financial support to public and private educational institutions to organize short-term international exchanges in artistic and cultural fields.

The MEES also offers the Promotion de l’enseignement collégial : productions étudiantes (link available in French only) program, which aims to help carry out special projects in certain fields, notably literature and the arts, through extra-curricular activities related to the student’s program of study or development. The objectives of this measure are to develop the student’s skills and creativity as well as help showcase colleges in their community.

Lastly, the CMADQ includes seven music schools as well as two drama schools. Its mission is to offer quality training.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Culture in the Schools program is one of the measures of the Protocole Culture-Éducation. Its objective is to produce citizens who are actively involved in cultural life by increasing the number of cultural experiences offered to pre-school, elementary school and secondary school students through collaboration with resources listed in the Répertoire de ressources culture-éducation (available in French only), which includes artists, writers and cultural organizations. Financial assistance is offered to schools to support them in carrying out these projects.

The program has two components:

  • Cultural workshops at school: This component makes it possible for artists to share their creative process with students during an in-class workshop.
  • Schools host an artist: Since 2013, this component has offered professional artists the opportunity to spend 4‑12 weeks in a school environment and find inspiration for their own creative pursuits, while allowing students to participate in a project involving artistic exploration.

The MEES also provides financial support to school board’s cultural committees who promote integrating culture into schools. In addition, February has been designated Cultural Activities Month and is an ideal time to hold activities to stimulate young people to undertake cultural projects that can be carried out in a subject taught at school.

The MCC offers the Mesure de concertation régionale en culture-éducation, which supports field trips to professional cultural organizations so that students can be introduced to culture outside of school and develop a taste in young people for professional cultural spaces.

The CMADQ administers music and drama schools for professional training as well as professional development for performers and creators. It is the only state-owned institution in North America that offers ongoing music training from the elementary school level up to the graduate level.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

As part of the Culture in the Schools program, 386,691 students participated in activities at school in 2012-2013. During that same year, 534,589 students participated in field trips. In 2014-2015, 32 projects were funded through the Schools host an artist program.

In 2014-2015, 16 projects were supported through the Promotion de l’enseignement collegial : productions étudiantes, which reached students at 72 colleges. For example, one project, Cégeps en spectacle, is a student contest with objectives notably to put college students in contact with various performance trades.

In 2013-2014, 68 students participated in exchanges through the Artistic and cultural college training international exchange support program. Through those projects, Quebec students participated in an improv tournament at the Festival des Lycéens d’Aquitaine in France with students from Germany, Italy, Romania and France.

The CMADQ admits about 800 music students and 75 drama students every year. It actively contributes to developing Quebec’s culture. The visibility of the school, in addition to the visibility of its teachers as well as past and present students, demonstrates the calibre of training it offers. The CMADQ contributes to regional and national vitality in several ways, notably through:

  • the CMADQ’s participation and involvement in youth orchestras from various areas of Quebec;
  • collaboration and partnerships with elementary and secondary schools to carry out musical projects for young people (concert band, etc.).
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MCC, MEES and CMADQ are responsible for implementing these measures.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

It would be impossible to present all the financial resources dedicated to culture and education for young people. Some data have been presented for information purposes.

In 2014-2015, $CAD 117.8K was allocated to the Promotion de l’enseignement collégial : productions étudiantes program.

Nearly $CAD 40K was allocated in 2013-2014 to the Artistic and cultural college training international exchange support program.

The CMADQ also received a nearly $CAD 28M grant from the Government of Quebec in 2014-2015.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ YOUTH

New Brunswick Artist-in-Residency Program for Schools

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Province of New Brunswick, through the Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture and the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, offers an Artist-in-Residency program for schools. The Artist-in-Residency School Program places professional artists in rural and urban schools to broaden and develop the arts education program by bringing together the creative potential of students and the unique energy of artists. It is intended to provide students and their teachers with the opportunity to spend a minimum of three days working closely with artists in order to enhance the students’ artistic perception and appreciation.

The objectives of the Artist-in-Residency program are:

  • To encourage and provide opportunities for students to express themselves and take part in the creative process at the earliest possible age and throughout every stage of their formal education;
  • To allow students to think creatively and critically through education in the arts;
  • To offer students the possibility to work with professional artists while actively participating in artistic projects in the context of their academic curriculum;
  • To help students develop a better appreciation of culture and the arts as well as local artists;
  • To witness a live performance, demonstration or exhibit by a professional artist; and
  • To encourage students to be creative from the time they are very young, which is one of the best guarantees of self-fulfillment, self-respect and the respect of others, all essential components of a culture of tolerance and peace.

For more information, please see: https://www.pxw1.snb.ca/snb7001/e/1000/CSS-FOL-SNB-22-0062E.pdf

 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Artist-in-Residency School Program funds art projects which are based on curricular outcomes within the Fine Arts and are a collaboration between one or more teachers and one or more artists. Schools work with professional artists in a variety of disciplines to provide students with meaningful opportunities to create, produce, participate in, and learn from the arts. To apply to the program, schools must initiate a project together with a professional artist or artists in any of the following artistic disciplines: music, dance, theatre arts, literature (playwriting, storytelling), plastic arts, and media arts such as film and video. Each residency must include a performance or live demonstration by the artist or artists, as well as a minimum of 15 hours of hands-on practice for the students.

Schools may receive up to $3,000 per residency. Five residencies per fiscal year per school district may be selected.

For more information, please see: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/services/services_renderer.201088.Arts_-_Professional_Artists_-_Artist-in-Residency_School_Program_Grant.html

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Artist-in-Residency School program is expected to expose youth to a variety of art forms while learning from a professional artist.

The program’s target outcomes are the following:

  • Students will gain a new level of appreciation for the arts combined with an increased level of understanding of the Fine Arts curriculum matter targeted by the residency;
  • Students will think creatively and understand deeply as they explore and develop their creative abilities while applying them in a variety of ways;
  • Students will think divergently and creatively while communicating effectively through the arts;
  • Students will manage, access, process, evaluate and present information aesthetically for a variety of audiences;
  • Students will be able to use various art forms, skills, language and techniques as a means of formulating, exploring and expressing ideas, perceptions and feelings.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture of New Brunswick
The Department of Education and Early Childhood Development of New Brunswick
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ YOUTH

Alberta’s Future Leaders Program

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Alberta Foundation for the Arts (AFA) and the Alberta Sport Connection (ASC) administer the annual Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) program for Indigenous youth. The AFL program was developed from the fundamental belief that “working together, we can make a difference,” and its vision is to work in partnership with communities to positively affect the lives of Indigenous children and youth. The program’s mission is to promote active, vibrant Indigenous communities, where local sports, recreation, arts and leadership experiences inspire youth to become positive leaders. The AFL program has partnered with 43 Indigenous communities across Alberta to create over one million participant hours of programming since its inception in 1996. There are currently 12 Indigenous communities that participate in the AFL program each year.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) program provides arts, sports, recreation and leadership opportunities to help strengthen and empower youth who live in Indigenous communities in Alberta. Mentors are selected by the program organizers before the beginning of every summer, and are trained extensively to prepare them for their roles. Mentors are young adults who come from a variety of backgrounds, and who can serve as positive role models for the youth participating in the program. Over the course of the summer, mentors develop and lead arts, sports and recreation programs, as well as camps, trips, and special events to teach the youth important life skills. Select future leaders from each host community are brought together to share ideas and learn new skills. This intercultural opportunity helps the youth create strong friendships and develop their leadership potential.  Upon returning home, most participants help the AFL Mentors to run programs, and many continue to serve their communities long after the summer ends.

The Arts Branch of the program selects and trains Mentors, and provides financial, moral and cultural support.  The Arts Mentors live in an Alberta Indigenous community from May to August each year. Arts Mentors deliver art programming in the form of art workshops, projects and instruction in a variety of arts disciplines. An integral component of the AFA arts programming is contracting Senior Artists (established Indigenous artists) to offer workshops in the communities. Senior Artists are important role models for Indigenous youth. They inspire confidence, teach leadership skills, and an appreciation for the arts, and build the self-esteem of participants. It is often a highlight for Indigenous youth to participate in arts projects alongside role models from their culture.

For more information, please see: http://www.affta.ab.ca/Arts-In-Alberta/Albertas-Future-Leaders

 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) program is expected to continue inspiring Indigenous youth to become positive leaders in their communities and beyond, through mentorship and new experiences in local sports, recreation, arts and leadership. The program has helped many youth aged 9-25 to build confidence, overcome barriers and realize their potential by providing them with new experiences, positive role models and opportunities. Youth who have been involved in the AFL Program are often inspired to complete high school and many continue on to pursue a post-secondary education in a variety of fields. For example, former AFL participants have gone on to become Chiefs, council members, youth workers, artists in a variety of arts disciplines, teachers, lawyers, participants in national sporting events, and many have continued to engage in arts and sports activities, projects and programs.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Alberta Foundation for the Arts
The Alberta Sport Connection
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Alberta Foundation for the Arts (AFA) allocates $140,000 CAD to the AFL Program and the Alberta Sport Connection (ASC) allocates $347,000 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Local
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The Alberta Futures Leaders program was evaluated by a Provincial Support Committee. The main conclusions of the evaluation include:

  • More Indigenous communities are providing sport and recreation programming.
  • Indigenous communities have increased capacity to develop and deliver sport and recreation programs.
  • Barriers to sport and recreation opportunities have been reduced in Indigenous communities.
  • An increased number of Indigenous youth is participating in sport and recreation programs across Alberta.
  • More communities are providing culturally relevant programming.
  • Indigenous communities value community development and recognize the benefits of sport and recreation.
  • There is an increased capacity to develop and deliver sport and recreation programs in Indigenous communities.
  • There is increased community collaboration in the development of sport and recreation programs.
  • More communities, organizations and associations incorporate traditional Indigenous culture into outdoor programming.
  • Volunteering is valued and increased in Indigenous communities.
  • There is an increased number of provincial associations working with Indigenous communities.
  • There is an increased presence of Indigenous communities at sport, recreation and events across Alberta.
  • More Indigenous communities utilize available opportunities (e.g. professional development, funding, etc.) for sport and recreation.
  • There is increased coordination between the Ministries involved in Indigenous programming
  • More Indigenous youth participate in high performance and sport activities.
i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Immediate outcomes were used, such as:

  • Sport and recreation opportunities are accessible by Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) Youth
  • AFL Mentors have the opportunity to develop skills related to sport, recreation and community development, as well as cultural awareness
  • AFL youth have the opportunity to develop skills that contribute to an active lifestyle
  • AFL youth have opportunity to learn about Indigenous cultures, community engagement, outdoor sport and recreation, as well as traditional Indigenous activities
  • AFL communities are aware of the benefits of volunteering and community development
  • AFL Mentors and youth have the opportunity to develop leadership skills in their communities
  • The AFL program provides opportunities to engage community members
  • AFL communities are aware of the benefits of collaboration
  • Provincial associations are aware of the benefits and opportunities available to work with Indigenous communities
  • AFL communities are aware of resources and opportunities that are available (e.g. funding, professional development)
Name of the designated official signing the report
Title:
Ms
Family Name:
Théberge
First Name:
Nathalie
Position:
Directrice Générale, Direction générale de la Politique du droit d'auteur et du Commerce International
Organization:
Canadian Heritage Department
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Eye on Canada

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

In June of 2013 at the Banff World Media Festival, the Eye on Canada brand was launched as part of a national strategy to promote Canadian content. It was developed by Telefilm, the Canada Media Fund, and the Canadian Media Production Association to unite all initiatives surrounding the promotion of Canadian audiovisual content and to resonate with various audiences at home and internationally. The brand is a conversation-starter for use by all Canadians to celebrate and promote the diversity and quality of Canadian audiovisual content, including feature films, television and digital media.

The site www.eyeoncanada.ca is a user-friendly online property that celebrates the uniqueness and diversity of Canada’s thriving audiovisual industry. Users of the site, which is updated regularly, will find new original content like interviews with cast members, producers and those involved in the creative process.

 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Eye on Canada branding initiative resulted in the creation of a bilingual website: http://www.eyeoncanada.ca/  and a growing discussion on social media with the hashtag #eyeoncanada.

On the website, contemporary Canadian screen-based content is curated for Canadian and international audiences, and allows viewers to browse or search for works. Designed with consumers of Canadian feature film, television and digital media, such as videogames, in mind, the website features profile pages on Canadian productions – past and present – featuring trailers, official pictures and production details, including information on lead cast members. The website also provides access to dynamic social media content so that users can follow and join the conversation on their favourite productions or discover new ones. It invites users to share and engage in conversations through the use of the hashtag #eyeoncanada, which unifies online discussion about Canadian screen-based content. Introduced in 2013, this hashtag is used as a reference by a growing number of supporters of Canadian content.

Users are able to access curated editorial content from well-known Canadian bloggers and vloggers regarding the latest news from the Canadian screen-based entertainment industry. A newsletter also allows subscribers to be the first to know about updates to Eye on Canada.

To help to make eyeoncanada.ca a destination for Canadian content, producers are invited to submit their film, television, and digital media productions to the Eye on Canada collection through an online form found on the website, making it easier for audiences to discover their work.

For more information, please see: https://www.telefilm.ca/en/news/releases/2015/03/03/eyeoncanadaca-celebrates-canadian-television-feature-film-and-digital-media

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

It is expected that the Eye on Canada brand will help promote Canadian screen-based content both in Canada and internationally. The website www.eyeoncanada.ca is expected to broaden audiences, helping Canadian producers gain exposure. Finally, the #eyeoncanada hashtag being used throughout social media will help to promote the national discussion about film, television and digital media.

 
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Telefilm Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Media Fund (CMF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The mission of the Canada Media Fund (CMF) is to foster, promote, develop and finance the production of Canadian content and relevant applications for all audiovisual media platforms. The CMF funds the sustainable production of screen-based Canadian content across multiple platforms such as television, wireless devices or the internet. Its goal is to guide Canadian content towards a competitive global environment through fostering industry innovation, rewarding success, enabling a diversity of voices and promoting access to content through industry and private sector partnerships. Created by Canada’s cable, satellite, and IPTV distributors and the Government of Canada, the CMF aspires to connect Canadians to their creative expressions, to each other, and to the world. From its launch in 2010-11 to 2013-14, the CMF leveraged $3.40 of activity for every dollar invested, for a total of $4.8 billion in industry activity.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Launched in 2010, the Canada Media Fund (CMF) is an arm’s-length public-private partnership, funded by the Government of Canada and Canadian cable, satellite, and IPTV distributors. The CMF is an independent corporation: while the Government sets out the policy parameters for the CMF, the Fund has its own Board of Directors, and the guidelines and administration of the funding program are its own responsibility. This governance model allows content review and creation to be separate from political involvement. The CMF regularly consults industry stakeholders in a regular, formal, inclusive and meaningful way.

The CMF promotes, develops and finances the production of Canadian content and applications for all audiovisual media platforms. The CMF delivers financial support to the Canadian television and digital media industries through two streams of funding. The Convergent Stream supports the creation of innovative, convergent television and digital media content for consumption by Canadians. The Experimental Stream encourages the creation of leading-edge, interactive digital media content and software applications. In 2014-15, the CMF contributed $365.6 million to Canadian television and digital media projects, triggering $1.3 billion in production activity. Through the Convergent Stream, 505 productions received $311.3 million in funding, which generated 2,800 hours of new content. Through the Experimental Stream, 108 innovative projects were selected and received $38.6 million in funding. The CMF also provides funding to television and digital media coproductions between Canadian and international producers (see measure entitled “Canada Media Fund’s funding for international coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction”).

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) is expected to continue to support the sustainable production of Canadian screen-based media across multiple platforms. It is expected to help Canadian content remain competitive in the global digital environment.

The vision of the CMF is that “Canadians and world audiences have access to and demand innovative, successful Canadian television and digital content on all platforms.”

For more information on the vision and mission of the CMF, please see its annual report: http://ar-ra14-15.cmf-fmc.ca/

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Government of Canada (The Department of Canadian Heritage)
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) receives financial contributions from the Government of Canada and Canada’s cable, satellite and IPTV distributors. Through CRTC regulations, broadcast distributors are required to make an annual contribution of 5% of their annual broadcasting revenues to Canadian programming, most of which goes to the CMF. The Government has provided $134.1 million per year in ongoing stable funding to the CMF since 2010-11.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

After the evaluation of its activities from 2010 to 2014, the Evaluation Services of the Department of Canadian Heritage concluded, among other things, that the Canada Media Fund (CMF):

1. Is responsive to the needs of Canadians

The CMF is the most important source of financing for Canadian digital content in the drama, documentary, children/youth, variety and performing arts genres. It addresses the issues associated with the small size of the official language markets, including the financial disincentives associated with creating original programming as compared to acquiring less expensive foreign content. The evaluation observed that the Government’s objectives in connection with official language minority communities in Canada are reinforced by the CMF through its support for productions in Aboriginal and official language minority communities.

2. Aligns with the priorities of the Government of Canada

The CMF’s mandate and objectives supports the federal government’s priority and the Department’s strategic outcome that "Canadian artistic expressions are created and accessible at home and abroad.” It is also consistent with the departmental priority of “taking full advantage of digital technology” and reinforces the Government’s digital agenda.

3. Aligns to Federal roles and responsibilities

The CMF is well aligned with the Government’s roles and responsibilities as it is an instrument to support Canadian broadcasting policy. The CMF supports the Department and its responsibility to ensure that the broadcasting and digital communications sectors contribute to the objectives set out in the Broadcasting Act.

The full evaluation can be found here: http://www.cmf-fmc.ca/documents/files/news/2015/dch-cmf-evaluation-summary.pdf

 
i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The evaluation was conducted in accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat evaluation policy framework and in accordance with the Federal Accountability Act and the Financial Administration Act. It addressed the core issues of relevance and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy. The evaluation process included the following activities: a literature review to conduct a scan of the broadcasting and digital media environments and comparative analysis with other similar programs; a document review; key informant interviews with stakeholder groups; case studies; a value-for-money analysis; an expert panel; and a “Looking Forward” analysis was conducted to contextualize the current evaluation within the rapidly evolving broadcasting and digital media industry. The evaluation covered the activities and expected outcomes of the program, including the Canada Media Fund (CMF) Corporation. Excluded from the scope of the evaluation were areas of activity which have an impact on the CMF, but on which the Department has no authority or limited influence, such as the performance of the CMF Board members.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Launched in 2013, the Ontario Music Fund (OMF) was the first comprehensive business development program to support all segments of the Ontario music industry, including live presenters. The key objective of the OMF is to strengthen and stimulate growth in Ontario’s music companies and support the province’s growing music sector. The Fund is designed to drive activity and investment and to support Ontario’s music companies and organizations in expanding their economic and cultural footprints within Canada and around the world. The OMF replaced the former Music Fund and Export Fund of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.

The goals of the OMF are to:

  • Increase music production activity in Ontario;
  • Strengthen and develop the support structures and systems that contribute to economic and cultural growth;
  • Increase opportunities for new/emerging Canadian artists;
  • Create opportunities for emerging artists/small music companies; and
  • Support Ontario’s musical diversity, particularly with respect to music from culturally diverse, Aboriginal and Franco-Ontarian communities.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF) aims to address investment gaps at key phases of company and industry development cycles. It provides matching financial support through four program streams to music companies (record labels, music publishers, music managers, artist entrepreneurs, music promoters, music presenters, and booking agents), and to music industry trade, service, event and training organizations. The Fund is structured to address the entire value chain of the music sector and to complement other support programs. Extensive consultations and partnerships with industry trade organizations were carried out in developing the program.

The four streams are: Music Industry Development, Music Company Development, Live Music, and Music Futures.

- The Music Industry Development stream is designed to strengthen and develop the support structures and systems that contribute to economic and cultural growth of the music industry in Ontario by supporting organizations engaging in strategic initiatives with long-term impacts on the growth and sustainability of Ontario’s music industry.

- The Music Company Development stream is intended to provide Ontario-based music companies with funding to support new or expanded business activities, including strategic business and market development, in the form of investments and undertakings.

- The Live Music stream is intended to increase the number and quality of live music experiences enjoyed by residents of and visitors to Ontario at events, festivals and concerts featuring Canadian artists.

- The Music Futures stream specifically creates opportunities for emerging artists and music businesses in Francophone, Aboriginal, and ethnocultural communities, as well as in under-represented musical genres.

For more information, please see:  http://www.omdc.on.ca/music/the_ontario_music_fund.htm

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF) is intended to help the Ontario music industry grow and expand in Canada and across the world. Expected results include an increase in music production activity, company revenues, and market share in Ontario, stronger support structures, increased opportunities for new and emerging Canadian artists and small music companies, as well as greater support of Aboriginal, ethnocultural, and Franco-Ontarian music communities. An increase in tourism attributed to live music performances is also expected.

The OMF is also advancing the Ontario government’s Live Music Strategy by providing support for live performances and touring opportunities, helping to grow audiences – both in Ontario and abroad – for Canadian music developed in Ontario.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Government of Ontario
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Announced in the 2013 Ontario Budget as a three-year, $45 million grant program, the Ontario Music Fund (OMF) was made permanent in the 2015 Ontario Budget at $15 million annually. For the year 2014, transfer payments made by the OMF were detailed at $14,004,000 CAD.

To date, the OMF has provided approximately $42.2 million to Ontario’s music industry.

Source: http://www.omdc.on.ca/Assets/Communications/Annual+Report/Annual+Report+2013-14_en.pdf

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Since the program was launched in 2013, three evaluation processes have been undertaken to review aspects of its operation:

  1. The program was reviewed from an operational point of view by the delivery agency, the Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC), as part of its regular cycle of program reviews. A third-party consultant was engaged to carry out review activities, which involved a limited level of stakeholder consultations.
  2. In 2016, the program was reviewed for compliance with internal Ontario government accountability directives by an internal audit team. This review focused on administrative effectiveness and compliances with rules for transfer payments.
  3. The ministry and the OMDC evaluated program rules and guidelines in 2015-16 as part of efforts to enhance effectiveness and return on investment, following the government’s decision in 2015 to extend the program beyond its initial three-year run. Stakeholders and industry trade associations were consulted as part of this process.

The program was found to be meeting its goals of stimulating expanded recording and performing activity in Ontario, but opportunities were found to sharpen results reporting and tracking of the return on investment.

The first and third evaluations included direct stakeholders and participants in the program (music companies and organizations through the province).

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The evaluations, in part, examined indicators such as:

  • The increase in the number of recordings released by Ontario companies (including both Canadian and foreign artists)
  • The increase in the number of live music performance opportunities presented, and total attendance (audience) for the events
  • The increase in overall revenues for participating companies, and, by proxy, market share
  • The increase in the business capacity of the participating independent companies, measured by full time employees, cash flow and probability
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Nova Scotia Status of the Artist Act

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

In 2012, the Government of Nova Scotia passed the Status of the Artist Act as a part of the implementation of the 2011 Arts and Culture 5-Point Plan. While not an official culture strategy, the 5-Point Plan set out the government’s priorities for supporting the development of the arts and culture sector for the following several years, which included developing and introducing Status of the Artist legislation.

The Act helps to define the role of artists and investment in supporting and fostering artistic activity in Nova Scotia. The legislation allows artists to set pay for work and services, outlines the government's roles and responsibilities toward artists, and helps ensure that Nova Scotians have access to artistic training and education. Another objective is to promote fair treatment for artists and enhance their contributions to making life better for families through Nova Scotia's creative economy.

For more information about the Act, please see: http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20120330002

For more information about the 5-Point Plan, please see: http://cch.novascotia.ca/sites/default/files/inline/documents/fivepointplan.pdf

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
legislative
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The province developed the legislation with input from the Creative Nova Scotia Leadership Council, which advises government on arts and culture policy, based on legislation and best practices in other jurisdictions. The Council is made up of representatives from the arts and culture sector.

The legislation:

  • Allows artists' associations to set levels of pay for works created and services rendered;
  • Encourages fair treatment of artists by government and outline government's roles and responsibilities to artists;
  • Continues to ensure all Nova Scotians have access to artistic training and education;
  • Acknowledges the working conditions of artists;
  • Affirms government's commitment to the rights of artists, for example, safe working conditions and freedom of expression and association; and
  • Ensures government has the necessary tools to support Nova Scotia's artists and their unique needs.

For more information, please see: http://nslegislature.ca/legc/bills/61st_4th/1st_read/b001.htm

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

As stated under the Act (article 2 – Purpose), the results expected through its implementation are the following: 

- the role of the artist in building the Province's identity and culture and the enhancement that art brings to the Province's social and economic well-being will be acknowledged;

- the terms by which Nova Scotians define who is a professional artist will be identified;

- the unique working conditions of the Province's professional artists will be acknowledged, as well as their right to:

  • freedom of expression and association;
  • have associations representing artists to be recognized in law and to promote their professional and socio-economic interests; and
  • have access to advisory forums in which artists may express their views on their status and any other questions concerning them.

Two areas in which the Status of the Artist legislation has had direct impact on the working conditions of professional artists in Nova Scotia are the positive consequences emerging from a clear definition of “Professional Artist” and the acknowledgement of their associated rights.

The Status of the Artist Act defines a “Professional Artist” and Arts Nova Scotia is able to use this legal definition in the eligibility criteria for its funding programs. The definition also has an impact beyond funding eligibility and extends into the area of labour standards.

Professional artists are considered to be “self-employed.” While this designation provides some benefits such as autonomy and freedom in the exercise of their work and allows them to claim work related expenses for taxation purposes, artists had no historical right to self-organize and bargain collectively. Many artistic disciplines organized themselves into associations, but until federal Status of the Artist legislation emerged, the impact of such self-organization across Canada was limited.  Nova Scotia’s Status of the Artist legislation allows for self-organization and collective bargaining in areas that are under provincial jurisdiction.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Government of Nova Scotia
The Creative Nova Scotia Leadership Council
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

No direct financial resources were associated with the implementation of the Status of the Artist Act itself. However, this new act defining “Professional Artist” was designed and established concurrently with legislation that created Arts Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia’s agency responsible for delivering approximately $3.4 million in support of the province’s professional artists and arts organizations.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Creative Saskatchewan

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan was established as a crown agency of the Government of Saskatchewan in July of 2013. The agency was created in recognition of the integral role that creative industries play in a vibrant Saskatchewan. 

Creative Saskatchewan stimulates the commercialization of creative products and helps Saskatchewan’s creative talent find firmer footing in domestic and international markets. The agency accomplishes this through a suite of grants, mentoring opportunities, marketing activities, and strong partnerships with creative industry associations. 

Since its establishment, the agency has been operating a variety of grants to support creative industry production, marketing and export. These grants have already made a major impact on Saskatchewan’s creative industries through investment and partnership building with creative industry associations. These partnerships strengthen the creative sector development plan and the agency’s aim to positively affect the gross domestic product (GDP) of the Province of Saskatchewan. Recent data from the Statistics Canada Culture Satellite Account shows that in 2014 Saskatchewan’s cultural GDP grew 3.3%, following a gain of 1.1% in 2013.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan is a provincial crown agency which works with the creative industries of the province. It is responsible for six sectors: music, screen based media, visual arts and fine craft, book publishing, live performing arts, and digital media. Below is a summary of Creative Saskatchewan’s nine funding programs and their intended impact on Saskatchewan’s cultural talent.

  1. Business Capacity – development of professional capacity and skills;
  2. Research - industry-based projects and market intelligence;
  3. Creative Industries Production - production and product refinement;
  4. Market and Export Development - for individuals/businesses and sector organizations;
  5. Market Travel - financial support toward awards, showcases, presentations, etc.;
  6. Sound Recording - production of commercially-viable music products;
  7. Screen-based Media Content Development - early phase projects;
  8. Screen-based Media Production - requiring a 30 per cent Saskatchewan spend; and
  9. Performing Arts Tour Support - must demonstrate commercial viability and have already lined up at least six performance dates.

Creative Saskatchewan is accountable for ensuring that program funds and association supports are dispersed equitably and effectively. To that end, grant applications for most programs are vetted through a peer review jury system. Juries are comprised of respected individuals from industry sectors suggested by the creative industry associations.

For more information, please see: http://www.creativesask.ca/

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Creative Saskatchewan is driven to achieve a future where Saskatchewan's creative producers continue to realize diverse commercial opportunities in national, international and emerging markets which collectively grow thriving, sustainable creative industries. Examples of projects funded include:

Craft

Adam Finn received $18,810 through the Creative Industries Production Grant to produce handcrafted leather footwear with the goal of expanding his business, Last Shoes, into larger markets.

Heather Abbey received $13,013 from the Market and Export Development Grant (MEDG) to assist with marketing expenses for the ShopIndig.ca Cart, which features products created by Saskatchewan-based artisans.

Digital/Interactive

OneStory Inc. received $2,833 through the Market Travel Grant and Culture on the Go program to attend the Sustainable Brand Activation Hub Market Place in San Diego.

Saskatchewan Interactive Media Association (SIMA) received $20,000 through the MEDG to develop and implement an innovative website designed to market, showcase and encourage business growth for Saskatchewan’s interactive digital media industry.

Music

Close Talker received $5,000 through the Market Travel and Culture on the Go program to showcase at The Great Escape festival in Brighton, England.

Jess Moskaluke received $80,500 through the MEDG to assist with expenses related to promotion and advertising, working with a publicist, filming a music video, website and social media strategy development/implementation, and a radio tour.

Publishing

Coteau Books received $30,700 through the Creative Industries Production Grant to assist with publishing seven new titles.

University of Regina Press received $30,953 through the Market and Export Development Fund to increase market and export presence, particularly in the U.S.A., through marketing activities, publicity and print advertising.

Screen-Based Media

Two Television series received funding through the Screen-Based Media Production Grant Program: Nordic Lodge (Season 2) received $168,500, and The Prairie Diner (Season 3) received $43,216.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Creative Saskatchewan
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan receives $7.7 million (CAD) in funding annually from the Government of Saskatchewan. Of this amount, $5 million is distributed directly through grant programs and $1.5 million is targeted to support operations for six creative industry associations: SaskBooks, SaskGalleries, SaskMusic, Saskatchewan Craft Council, Saskatchewan Interactive Media Association and the Saskatchewan Media Production Industry Association. The remaining budgeted funds are targeted to marketing, trade missions, market export initiatives, professional development and administration.

The detailed financial statements of Creative Saskatchewan can be found online at the following link: http://www.creativesask.ca/

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Stakeholder consultations on the success of Creative Saskatchewan in achieving its mission and client services were conducted in 2015. The consultations led to the implementation by Creative Saskatchewan of several recommendations, including a new communications plan, a new website and an online application system, a review of program policies and procedures, an examination of funding equity, and a review of board governance.

For more information on the consultation report, please see: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/public-consultations/creative-saskatchewan-review

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Indicators used to assess successes of the Crown Agency included: alignment with Saskatchewan’s cultural policy and with sister agencies that support arts (Saskatchewan Arts Board) and culture (SaskCulture); alignment with government direction; compliance with agency legislation; progress toward agency goals; and achievements in sector development, communications and client services.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Quebec: Quebec's Digital Cultural Plan

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Digital technology has reconstructed artistic disciplines, opened markets and fragmented audiences, multiplied methods of production and dissemination, changed consumer habits and shaken up traditional business models. Aware of this evolving reality, the MCC began a vast consultation process in 2010 to determine the first steps to take in the digital transformation of culture in Quebec.

In the quadrennial periodic report on measures to protect and promote cultural diversity submitted in 2012, Quebec announced that digital cultural content would be a priority focus for the coming years and that a strategy would be developed for digital cultural content development and access.

The work begun by the MCC therefore led to the development of Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan in collaboration with the network of state-owned enterprises and organizations, as well as stakeholders in the cultural and communications field. The Plan was unveiled in 2014 and spans seven years. It helps ensure the vitality of Quebec culture and make its influence felt in local, national and international markets. It provides a basis for helping cultural environments to make a smooth transition to digital technologies so that Quebec can continue to count on that significant support for its economy and remain competitive in world markets.

Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan is based on three key strategies:

  • creating digital cultural content;
  • innovating to adapt to digital culture;
  • disseminating digital cultural content to ensure its accessibility.

The purpose of the plan is to:

  • provide cultural stakeholders with the means to create and innovate in a rapidly growing technological environment;
  • disseminate “Our culture, here, everywhere” with preference given to disseminating Quebec culture to the largest number of people in local, national and international markets.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
Regional
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan (available online in French only) proposes over 50 measures for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. Digital technology is changing quickly, and measures for later years will be specified at a later time.

The measures are grouped by main cultural sectors. The following are examples of measures by sector:

  • Drama and performing arts: help acquire digital equipment for multidisciplinary and specialized publicists.
  • Arts and literature: support artists, writers, artists’ or writers’ collectives and artistic organizations in their efforts to integrate new creation tools by funding the creation and development of original, digital cultural content.
  • Film: help regional theatre operators to disseminate cultural works using current digital technologies to provide regional public access to Quebec cultural works that are unavailable in the region.
  • Reading and books: support an update of Quebec’s public libraries’ digital collections to reach a wider readership.
  • Media: organize a one-day conference on the impacts and perspectives of changes in the media.
  • Museology: create a digital platform (EducArt) to disseminate thematic content based on the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ collections that is adapted to needs of various audiences.
  • Music: increase support for music industry businesses in adjusting to digital technologies and enriching content.
  • Heritage: develop a collaborative platform to analyze and disseminate Quebec’s archeological reference collections.
  • All sectors: coordinate and host a space to exchange ideas on the rise of digital technologies in culture (Lab culturel, available in French only).

 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Through Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan, the MCC is supporting cultural communities by taking account of the importance of the changes underway stemming from digital technologies and ensuring that Quebec’s cultural works and products are available on digital platforms, which now knows no bounds. The Plan therefore encourages the dissemination of Quebec culture to a wide audience in local, national and international markets.

The MCC must ensure that future investments reflect needs as much as possible. As a result, the MCC is part of an ongoing conversation with cultural and digital communities and paying attention to the problems and observations noted through the various consultation processes or events related to digital technologies.

In order to face the various challenges presented by digital technologies, Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan must expand the scope of its actions to reach as many stakeholders as possible in cultural, academic and other sectors for more of the cultural network to adopt digital technologies across the board.

The cultural networks, artists and public’s digital skills also need to be improved.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MCC is responsible for implementing Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan, in cooperation with cultural state-owned enterprises and organizations.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

A total of $CAD 110M has been budgeted over seven years to implement Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan. A total of $CAD 36M has been invested for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 to implement 51 measures in the following sectors:                                                                            $CAD M

  • Drama and performing arts

1.1

  • Arts and literature

6.3

  • Film

2.45

  • Reading and books

2.525

  • Media

2.05

  • Fine craft

0.2

  • Museology

10.9

  • Music

3.0

  • Heritage

5.125

  • All sectors

2.35  

TOTAL    36.0

 

An addition $CAD 10.23M was announced in 2013-2014 to fund five digital infrastructure initiatives in Quebec’s various regions.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The CRTC’s review of its television policies to facilitate the transition to an increasingly on-demand environment

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The television system is undergoing a fundamental shift brought on by broadband Internet and wireless networks. Increasingly, Canadians seek greater control over the programs they watch and access content on an even wider array of devices, sometimes bypassing the traditional curators of content, such as broadcasters and distributors.

In response to this changing environment, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) launched Let's Talk TV: A conversation with Canadians in 2013, a consultation about the future of the television system and how it can adapt to evolving technologies and new consumption habits. The two-year process, involving three phases and innovative engagement methods, produced a record 13,000 interventions from Canadians, industry, and interested stakeholders. Subsequent decisions and three new policies were released in early 2015 to ensure that Canadians are at the center of a diverse, affordable, responsive and forward-looking television system.

The detailed implications of these new policies are starting to be known but have yet to fully unfold at this stage. This will be a topic of interest for Canada’s next periodic report.

Based on the assumption that Canadians will continue to migrate from scheduled television and packaged programming services to an on-demand and tailored television environment, the CRTC has adopted measures designed to facilitate that transition. These measures are meant to provide incentives for all players in the broadcasting system to find new and innovative approaches to support the creation of compelling and diverse programming.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The measures are based on four themes:

A. Making Canadian programming widely available and visible

To increase country-wide access to Canadian programming on Canadian-operated online platforms, the CRTC created a new hybrid video-on-demand (VOD) service category, which is exempted from the requirement to hold a broadcasting license. This will remove barriers for Canadian companies and allow them to compete in an on-demand environment.

In order to ensure that the contents of programming packages align with the needs and interests of Canadians, an industry working group is developing new tools, such as an audience measurement system.

The CRTC hosted a summit on the discoverability of Canadian television programs in early 2016.

B. An emphasis on quality rather than quantity

To support the production of high-quality programming, the CRTC is shifting from a regulatory approach based on exhibition quotas (the number of hours of Canadian programming broadcast) to one based on expenditures (the amount of money spent on Canadian programming).

C. Regulatory support for specific types of programming which are of interest, but only where market failure is demonstrated

The CRTC is eliminating the genre exclusivity policy, which limited programming services to offering only certain types of programming and precluded others from offering the same. In doing so, the CRTC allows new services to enter the marketplace, programming flexibility, and greater domestic competition. This ensures that programming diversity is governed by market forces to the greatest extent possible, as services will be able to respond to consumers and adopt creative strategies.

However, the CRTC maintained support mechanisms for the types of programs considered to be of national interest (documentaries and dramas), and strengthened its criteria for national news services.

D. A simplified and streamlined licensing process

The CRTC is instituting measures to reduce regulatory burden by exempting a greater number of programming services from the requirement to hold a broadcasting license.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

A concerted effort by all players in the broadcasting system, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), is currently under way to find new and innovative approaches to support the creation of compelling and diverse Canadian programming. The measures outlined by the CRTC to address the ongoing television system’s transition to an increasingly on-demand environment are designed to focus on the creation and distribution of quality Canadian content which will appeal to a worldwide audience. Increased flexibility will enable broadcasters to adapt to the shifting digital environment and to improve the promotion and discoverability of Canadian programming in an on-demand digital world.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Book Fund (CBF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Book Fund (CBF) ensures access to a diverse range of Canadian-authored books nationally and internationally, by fostering a strong book industry that publishes and markets Canadian-authored books. The Government of Canada provides support for the Canadian book industry through two main streams of the CBF: Support for Publishers and Support for Organizations, the former with two components: Publishing Support and Business Development.

The Publishing Support component strengthens the Canadian book industry by providing financial assistance to publishers for the ongoing production, marketing and distribution of Canadian-authored books. Supplementary funding based on export sales is also available as part of Publishing Support. The Business Development component strengthens the Canadian book industry by providing financial assistance to publishers for the following projects: publishing internships, technology internships and business planning.

Support for Organizations helps organizations and associations in the Canadian book industry with two key objectives in mind: the marketing and promotion of Canadian-authored books, and strengthening the infrastructure and capacity of the industry.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The bulk of Canada Book Fund (CBF) support is delivered through the Support for Publishers stream, which provides funding distributed primarily through a formula that rewards success in delivering content that Canadians value. This funding contributes to the ongoing production and marketing of Canadian-authored books by offsetting the high costs of publishing in Canada and building the capacity and competitiveness of the sector.

In 2014, the funding for the CBF was renewed permanently. The objectives of the renewal were that the program would be focused on digital innovation and international competitiveness while working within the existing budget.

Changes to the program included the following:

  • Significant overhaul of the formula designed to provide greater support to smaller businesses that need it most, provide greater focus on digital sales, and simplify the overall approach.
  • Lower barriers to entry for newer, innovative businesses (requisite period of 36 months in business reduced to 12 months).
  • An obligation for publishers (with some exceptions) to publish e-books (effective 2016-17) and a stronger emphasis on rewarding their success in selling them.
  • Digital-only publishers and digital-only titles are now eligible for funding.
  • Priority is given to projects with an international focus (particularly those that focus on digital exports).
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected results for the Canada Book Fund (CBF) are the following:

  • Readers everywhere have access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books produced by CBF recipients.
  • Readers everywhere consume a broad range of Canadian authored books supported by the CBF.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Canada Book Fund (CBF) has an annual budget of $39.1 million CAD, and provides annual funding through two streams:

- Support for Publishers, which has a budget of $30.7 million CAD.

- Support for Organizations, which has a budget of $6 million CAD.

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation of the Canada Book Fund was completed in 2014. The evaluation, which was conducted by the Evaluation Services Directorate of the Department of Canadian Heritage, in conjunction with a third-party consulting firm, is part of the normal Government of Canada program assessment process. The evaluation concluded that the program remains relevant, well-aligned with government objectives and has achieved its expected outcomes. The evaluation recommended that the program provide support to recipients that will encourage greater production, marketing and sales of digital books.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The following expected outcomes were identified for the Canada Book Fund (CBF): (1) creation of a diverse range of Canadian-authored books; (2) accessibility for consumption of a diverse range of Canadian-authored books in Canada and abroad; and (3) support for the viability of Canada’s book publishing industry.

For the first expected outcome, the following indicators were examined: the number of new eligible works funded by the CBF, as well as the diversity of works according to language, province of production and literary genre. With respect to the second expected outcome, the evaluation looked at Canadians’ book consumption habits, the revenues of CBF-funded publishers, the diversity of Canadian-authored titles sold by program-funded publishers, and the effectiveness of program support for promotion and marketing. As for the third outcome, the following indicators were assessed: the number and diversity of publishers in Canada’s book industry, the long-term profit margin of Canadian book publishers, and the extent of their participation in new technologies and best practices.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) co-administers two tax credit programs with the Canada Revenue Agency: The Canadian Film or Video Tax Credit Program (CPTC) for Canadian content; and The Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) for non-Canadian content.

The key objectives of CAVCO are to encourage Canadian programming and to stimulate the development of an active domestic independent production sector, as well as to stimulate job growth by encouraging Canadians and foreign-based film producers to employ the services of Canadians. CAVCO provides certification for an eligible production, confirming that it meets the requirements of the two programs described above and can receive a tax credit from the Canada Revenue Agency.

To be recognized as a Canadian film or video production, a live action production must be allotted a total of at least six points according to the creative points scale below.  Points will only be awarded if the person(s) who rendered the services is/are Canadian.

Director - 2 points; Screenwriter - 2 points; Lead performer for whose services the highest remuneration was payable  - 1 point; Lead performer for whose services the second highest remuneration was payable - 1 point; Director of photography - 1 point; Art director - 1 point; Music composer - 1 point; Picture editor - 1 point.

When a production meets the CPTC program requirements, CAVCO makes a recommendation to the Minister of Canadian Heritage to issue a Canadian film or video production certificate.  The certificate also provides an estimate of the production's qualified labour expenditures, needed for calculating the tax credit. The certificate is based on an analysis of detailed cost estimates, financing plans including amounts deemed assistance, and the Canadian content requirements of the CPTC program.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO), along with the Canada Revenue Agency, administers the following refundable tax credit programs to support the film and television production industry in Canada:  

1) The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC) encourages the creation of Canadian programming and the development of an active domestic independent production sector. It is available to Canadian production companies for productions qualified as Canadian content; qualified productions must meet specific criteria for key creative personnel and production costs. The CPTC is available at a rate of 25 percent of the qualified labour expenditure.

2) The Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) encourages the employment of Canadians by taxable Canadian or foreign-owned corporations with a permanent establishment in Canada. The PSTC is equal to 16 percent of salary and wages paid to Canadian residents or taxable Canadian corporations for services provided to the production in Canada.

The first program is cultural. It credits Canadian labour expenses on Canadian content productions that are owned and controlled by Canadians.  The second program is purely industrial. It invites the world to film their productions in Canada. Companies that service non-content productions can get a credit on the Canadian labor they employ. The PSTC builds up the Canadian production infrastructure when foreign companies come to Canada to film their productions.

The Canadian tax credit model has been replicated around the world because it is seen as a stable and effective way to offer government support. Together, both programs cost the federal government some $380 million annually depending on the level of production activity. The total volume of film and television production in Canada reached an all-time high of $7.1 billion in production activity in 2014-15.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The results expected from the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) are as follows:

1) Canadian content film and television productions receive certification from the Department of Canadian Heritage.

2) Non-Canadian content film and television productions using Canadian production services receive accreditation from the Department of Canadian Heritage.

In turn, this will contribute to Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content being created and accessible at home and abroad. Reaching Canadian audiences with more Canadian content remains the key underlying goal of the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC). Through this program, the Government of Canada can invest in this cultural vehicle and make possible the production of thousands of hours of Canadian content. As all Canadian content productions must be shown in Canada, Canadians have the opportunity to see them. This helps meet the overall departmental objective of reaching Canadian audiences.  

Another key expected result is related to the economic growth generated by such foreign productions and the expertise acquired by workers and technicians employed in the film and video industry sector.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Actual spending in 2013-14 was $ - 409,992 CAD. This negative number represents a surplus or, as for CAVCO, revenues. CAVCO collects user fees from clients. As its planned and actual revenues were higher than its expenditures, CAVCO generated revenues in 2013-14.

For more information, please see: http://www.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-verEval-audEval/STAGING/texte-text/dpr-rmr-2013-14_1415218344790_eng.pdf

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Tax credit programs are seen as a very stable and predictable form of government support that act to leverage other public and private contributions and against which banks are willing to lend.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Performance Indicator 1: Stability and predictability

While foreign sources of production financing have decreased and Canadian television licenses are static, tax credits have provided an ongoing and stable source of funding. Stable funding allows companies to survive through lean times.

Performance Indicator 2: Reaching Canadian audiences

A greater amount of Canadian content is now available. Through the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC), the government’s investment in this cultural vehicle has made possible the production of thousands of hours of Canadian content. A higher amount of Canadian content ensures that it is available for audiences that want to watch it.

Performance Indicator 3: Corporate financing vehicle

The CPTC has not yet met its stated objective of having a stable form of corporate financing. Rising production costs and lower amounts of foreign financing force producers to invest the credit in the production rather than in their corporations. As well, Telefilm Canada and other investors force producers to use the credit as production financing. The CPTC will be evaluated in 2016.

Performance Indicator 4: Employment

Tax credits are economic engines that help to create direct and indirect employment.  For instance, the Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) builds up the Canadian production infrastructure when foreign companies come to Canada to shoot their productions. Since 1997, this industrial model has injected $24.4 billion of new money into the Canadian economy. This new money has more than repaid the tax expenditures spent by the government on tax credit.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) provided by the Department of Canadian Heritage aims to give Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. The CAPF recognizes that arts presenters are key partners in achieving this objective by providing financial assistance to organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series and organizations that offer support to arts presenters. The fund is available to presenters and organizations across Canada, including those in underserved communities and populations.

Through the CAPF, Canadians have access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. Each year, the CAPF supports approximately 600 professional arts festivals and performing arts series, as well as other activities related to arts presentation, in more than 250 cities and communities across Canada.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) has two main components – Programming and Development. The CAPF Programming component has two streams: Professional Arts Festivals and Performing Arts Series Presenters, and Presenter Support Organizations.

The CAPF Programming component provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as their support organizations.  In 2014-15, the program funded recipients in 250 communities across the country through 242 festivals, 262 performing arts series, 82 organizations that presented both a festival and a series, and 29 presenter support organizations.

The CAPF program also has a Development component to support the emergence of arts presenters and support organizations for underserved communities and populations such as aboriginal, ethnocultural, official language minority communities, youth, remote and rural communities, and contemporary artistic disciplines and genres.

Examples of recipients funded under the CAPF include the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto, Ontario, the Manitoba Theatre for Young People based in Winnipeg, the Festival international Nuits d'Afrique in Montréal, Quebec, and the Calgary International Reggae Festival (ReggaeFest) in Alberta.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) is expected to achieve two goals:

1. To ensure Canadian not-for-profit arts organizations offer a variety of arts festivals and series through funding provided by the CAPF.

2. To give Canadians, including those in underserved communities, access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities.

In 2014-15, the CAPF achieved both goals by providing funding support to encourage recipients in providing program variety and interaction between artists and citizens, as well as the presentation of challenging and innovative artistic experiences in Canada. These results, which are consistent with the past two years, reflect the CAPF's goals to fund recipients to present a wide range of artistic performances reflecting Canadian cultural and regional diversity, to reach underserved communities, and to encourage Canadians to engage and participate in artistic experiences. Ultimately, the long-term results of the CAPF will allow Canadians to experience and value professional artistic experiences.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

In 2014-15, the budgetary financial resourced dedicated to the program were $34,711,933 CAD.

For detailed figures, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

 
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation focused on the period from 2007-08 to 2012-13 was conducted for three Canadian Heritage Programs included in the Arts Policy Branch: the Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF), Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF), and Canada Cultural Investment Fund (CCIF). As specified by Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada’s Directive on the Evaluation Policy (2009), the core issues addressed in this evaluation were: relevance, including continued need for the programs, alignment with government priorities, alignment with federal roles and responsibilities, and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy.

The main conclusions and findings are that there is a continuing need for ongoing federal government support to the arts and heritage sector through programs such as the CAPF, which helps ensure that all Canadians have access to and benefit from arts and heritage experiences. Factors such as the digital revolution, the economic downturn and changing demographics contribute to the need for federal government support to ensure that arts and culture remain accessible, relevant, and sustainable.

The evaluation also found that the CAPF enabled a large number of arts presenters to reach a wide range of communities and audiences, expose communities to various professional artistic experiences, strengthen their linkages in the community, and further develop their professional skills. On average, nearly 600 projects were funded annually across a wide range of disciplines, communities and groups, including underserved populations. About 65% of communities reached with the CAPF programming component and 28% of communities reached with the development component were rural and remote.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Canadians in all regions of the country engage and participate in a variety of professional artistic experiences:

  • Number and type of communities reached (by population size/urban, rural and remote)
  • Number and percentage of professional arts presenters that reach out to underserved communities

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-PCH2-PCH-InstitutionalProfile/STAGING/texte-text/2014_Grouped_Arts_Evaluation_1453817656247_eng.pdf

 
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

Facilitating the temporary entry/work of foreign artists in Canada

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

First, supporting the international mobility of artists offers Canadians greater and more diversified access to foreign talent. This exposure allows for learning opportunities, and a deeper understanding and appreciation of global art and cultures. Second, attracting elite talent infuses domestic industries with unique and world-class cultural knowledge, skills, and creativity. This, in turn, stimulates and builds capacity to develop home-grown talent. Third, by reducing barriers to cultural exchanges and forging relationships with other countries and artists, Canada creates reciprocal opportunities for Canadians abroad and enhances its reputation among international artistic communities. Lastly, facilitating foreign artists supports existing public investments in arts and culture, and has the potential to attract high-value work to Canada. An open door policy encourages the creation and maintenance of vibrant and sustainable arts and cultural industries in Canada.

In Canada, foreign artists may be authorized to work without a work permit. Typically, they perform in Canada for a limited period of time, are not being hired for ongoing employment, and are not involved in making a film, television or radio show. They include:

  • Musical and theatrical individuals/group and their essential crew;
  • Street performers and DJs;
  • Circuses;
  • Guest artists performing with a Canadian performance group for a time-limited engagement;
  • Performers at a private event for a time-limited engagement;
  • Artists working at or attending a showcase/workshop;
  • Visual artists creating or displaying their work;
  • Film producers;
  • Small groups of film and recording studio renters (not entering the labour market);
  • Short-term, essential personnel for a foreign-financed commercial shoot.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The International Mobility Program, whose primary objective is to advance Canada’s broad economic and national interests, is an avenue for facilitation of foreign artists' entry into Canada. The program supports key international agreements and partnerships, such as reciprocal cultural treaties between Canada and countries like Belgium, Brazil, Germany, Italy, Japan and Mexico. Foreign artists entering Canada to take employment under the terms of such treaties require a work permit, but are exempted from the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA).

Television and film:

Foreign nationals in the television and film industry whose position is essential to a production may be eligible for an LMIA exemption where: the positions are high-wage and unionized; the television or film production meets the criteria to be eligible for government tax credits; and the relevant union/guild has no objections.

Work that is essential to television and film production creates significant economic benefits and opportunities for Canada. This exemption applies to television and film production in Canada, regardless of whether the production is foreign or Canadian and whether it is filmed entirely or partially in Canada.

Performing Arts:

Creative personnel employed by non-profit dance, opera, orchestra and live theatre organizations may also be eligible for an LMIA exemption where: the organization receives funding from the Canada Council for the Arts or via parliamentary appropriation; and the relevant Canadian performing arts representative or organization demonstrates reciprocity for the discipline.

Facilitating the entry of foreign nationals working in these fields contributes to competitive advantages and reciprocal benefits for all Canadians, including performing artists and performing arts organizations.

For more information, please see:
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/temp/work/permit/arts/index.asp

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The exemptions under the International Mobility Program are expected to support and enhance public access and investments in arts and culture and/or provide Canadians with similar opportunities abroad. By facilitating the international mobility of artists, both domestic and overseas industries benefit from an exchange of skills, experiences, and perspectives, and Canada continues to attract valuable work and talent. Overall, the measures contribute to Canada’s ability to be an internationally-recognized hub of artistic excellence and cultural innovation.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

National Film Board’s digital distribution partnership with China’s Phoenix New Media Limited

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) is a federal cultural agency within the portfolio of the Department of Canadian Heritage which creates ground-breaking interactive works, social-issue documentaries and auteur animation. During the 2012-13 fiscal year, many of the NFB’s efforts were centred on managing existing relationships with other organizations and signing new partnerships with leading content aggregators and digital distributors.

In 2013, the NFB partnered with China’s Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG) to create NFB ZONE, the first Canadian-branded online channel in the People’s Republic of China. The channel offers Chinese internet users access to films produced and distributed by the publicly-funded Canadian filmmaker. Phoenix New Media, a private-sector media company, offers premium content across internet, mobile and TV channels in China, and its web portal and mobile channels reach 300 million page views each day.

The strategic partnership aims to enrich the NFB’s global distribution channels and Phoenix’s video content library, as well as to offer Chinese audiences an ideal destination to reach high-quality Canadian-produced documentaries and animated films. This partnership is the result of years of engagement between the NFB and Chinese partners, working together to forge relationships and utilize mobile media technology to build cultural bridges and business opportunities.

For more information, please see: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/rapp_annuel_ONF_ang_2012-2013.pdf

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

In May 2013, the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and Chinese company Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG) announced the creation of NFB ZONE, the first Canadian-branded online channel in the People’s Republic of China. This unprecedented partnership, which permits the airing of almost 130 NFB animated and documentary films, is in line with the NFB’s business plan favouring the creation of strategic partnerships and strengthening its leadership in the new international digital media landscape.

For more information, please see: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/en/about-the-nfb/publications/institutional-publications/departmental-performance-report-2012-2013/

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The strategic partnership between the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG) will lead to an increased audience and exposure for documentaries and animated films which are produced by the NFB, through digital distribution across multiple platforms in China. Consequently, the increased level of exposure will lead to stronger recognition of Canadian audiovisual content abroad, allowing the NFB to grow its international reputation.

This measure will also favour the creation of further strategic partnerships and strengthen the NFB’s leadership in the new international digital media landscape. 2013 was the final chapter of the NFB’s 2008–2013 Strategic Plan that proposed a sweeping transformation of the film board, and challenged it to lead the way in the new digital age with productions that placed Canada at the forefront of digital media innovation.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The National Film Board of Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Phoenix New Media Limited (FENG)
Type of Entity: 
Private company
Type of Involvement: 

The type of involvement is a strategic partnership, as Phoenix New Media holds the exclusive right to air and redistribute the content library of the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) as part of their overall video content library.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

An audiovisual treaty coproduction is a feature film or television production that has been created by pooling the creative, technical and financial resources of Canadian and foreign producers. Governed under the terms of a treaty, these productions are granted national status, and as such, are also eligible for federal and provincial tax credits and additional funding sources such as the Canada Media Fund and the Canada Feature Film Fund. In addition, treaty coproductions qualify for Canadian content quotas for broadcasting, which offers Canadian producers greater opportunity for broadcasting their project on a Canadian network during prime viewing time, and for obtaining higher license fees for their productions.

Canada was one of the first countries to recognize the advantages of audiovisual treaty coproductions.  These treaties have advanced the audiovisual industry in Canada, strengthening international ties in the cultural sector; and promoting and disseminating Canadian culture abroad.

In recent years, the international audiovisual coproduction environment has experienced significant changes due to technological advances and greater global competition for investment. In light of these changes, in February 2011 the Government of Canada announced Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction to position Canada as an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice. The policy incorporates input from previous consultations with federal, provincial and territorial partners, as well as industry stakeholders’ comments, to set out the best direction for Government action in support of audiovisual treaty coproduction activity.

The guiding principles of flexibility; openness to renegotiation and negotiation of treaties; alignment of coproduction promotional activities; and simplification of administrative procedures help to achieve the policy’s objective.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Positioning Canada as an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice will attract foreign investment that will help further seize the benefits of coproduction for Canadian industry and audiences. Reaching this objective guides the Government’s approach to all aspects of treaty coproduction – from developing the terms of treaties and selecting potential partner countries to negotiate with, to managing and coordinating coproduction administration in Canada.

In March 2013, the Government announced the implementation of Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction, which is achieved through the negotiation of audiovisual coproduction treaties using a new model treaty that responds to the evolving audiovisual practices and technological changes over time. The model treaty serves as Canada’s negotiation position and is not shared publicly.

The decision to negotiate a treaty is based on how well the foreign partner is aligned with the Government of Canada’s priorities and policies, including Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction and those relating to foreign relations and international trade. In selecting coproduction partners, determining factors include whether the partner:

  • shares Canada's economic and industrial approach;
  • represents a key coproduction market for Canada's audiovisual industry;
  • offers a significant potential audience thereby increasing viewership;
  • represents a strong trade partnership for Canada; and
  • whether the treaty coproductions undertaken with this partner will yield economic benefits to Canada.

From Canada's perspective, every audiovisual coproduction treaty must stimulate investment in Canada, create opportunities for the Canadian audiovisual industry to access new markets, generate employment for Canadians and establish or expand international markets for Canadian talent and audiovisual productions.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Through the implementation of Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction, it is expected that Canada will be positioned as an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice and will attract foreign investment that will help develop outstanding infrastructure and talent in Canada’s audiovisual industry, enhance its international competitiveness, assist the industry to adapt to a rapidly changing audiovisual environment, and showcase Canadian content and creators to audiences in Canada and abroad.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
Telefilm Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The implementation of Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction does not require the investment of financial resources, other than human resource expenditures by the Department of Canadian Heritage.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

Quebec: Cooperation initiatives led by Quebec within international organizations

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

On a multilateral level, the Government of Quebec is contributing to strengthening international collaboration, mainly within two international organizations: UNESCO and the International Organisation of la Francophonie (IOF).

In those organizations, the Government of Quebec supports initiatives and gives preference to issues it considers to be a priority in relation to Quebec’s International Policy, the purpose of which is notably to strengthen Quebec’s capacity for action and influence, promote Quebec’s identity and culture and contribute to the global international solidarity effort.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

International Organisation of la Francophonie

The Government of Quebec is a full member of the IOF, which includes 75 states and governments (56 members and 19 observers). As the fifth financial backer of the IOF, it actively supports carrying out IOF programming. The IOF’s various cultural programs help support production, distribution and dissemination in areas like the performing arts, digital arts, media, multimedia and media arts, literature and music.

The Government of Quebec also supports the actions carried out by the Agence universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF) in its 2014-2017 cultural programming. As an operator of la Francophonie, the AUF brings together higher education and research institutions, totalling 812 member institutions in 104 countries. As a result, it represents one of the largest university associations in the world.

UNESCO

The Government of Quebec also contributes to strengthening international collaboration within UNESCO by fostering the emergency of dynamic cultural sectors in developing countries through its contribution to the IFCD. Along with other contributors, it encourages carrying out projects to:

  • develop policies and strategies that have a direct impact on the creation, production and distribution of diverse cultural expressions, as well as access to them;
  • strengthen institutional infrastructures that are deemed necessary to support viable cultural industries on the local and regional scale.

In 2015, the Government of Quebec’s contribution was provided by the MCC, MRIF, CALQ and SODEC.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

By supporting measures as part of IOF and UNESCO’s IFCD programs, the Government of Quebec is working towards the following objectives:

International Organisation of la Francophonie

  • Promote and enhance the status of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions;
  • Assist states in developing and reviewing their cultural policies;
  • Support the structuring of cultural industry channels;
  • Support the movement of artists, thanks notably to the fund supporting the circulation of artists;
  • Support the dissemination and marketing of cultural products from the south;
  • Support the production, promotion and marketing of audiovisual work from southern countries.

UNESCO

  • Meet the needs and priorities of countries where projects are carried out;
  • Contribute to obtaining concrete, measurable, realistic and lasting results;
  • Have a potential structural impact leading to the emergence of a dynamic cultural sector;
  • Encourage South-South and North-South-South cooperation
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
•UNESCO : MCC, MRIF, CALQ, and SODEC •IOF and AUF: MRIF
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

IOF

In 2015, the Government of Quebec spent $CAD 3.1M on carrying out IOF (non-operational) programming. With a total programming budget of $CAD 58.8M (€38.8M), an estimate 12% of IOF programming funds are dedicated to culture. As a result, Quebec’s funding for IOF cultural programming is estimated at $CAD 403K.

AUF

The Government of Quebec allocated $CAD 560K to the AUF in 2015 to carry out its (non-operational) programming. An indeterminate portion of that amount was dedicated to cultural programming.

UNESCO

Since it was founded, the Government of Quebec has contributed a total $CAD 250K to the IFCD. In 2015, the Government of Quebec allocated $CAD 50K to the IFCD. More specifically, four Quebec ministries and organizations contributed:

  • MRIF: $CAD 20K
  • MCC: $CAD 20K
  • CALQ: $CAD 5K
  • SODEC: $CAD 5K
h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
No
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION

The Canada Media Fund’s support for international digital media coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction

Context of the measure: 
INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL COOPERATION
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) supports the coproduction and co-development of content with international partners. The CMF supports international coproductions through its Convergent and Experimental streams. In 2014-15, international treaty coproductions represented a small portion of CMF Convergent funded projects (2.1% of all funding), and four international coproductions were funded through the Experimental stream.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

A Digital Media Coproduction Incentive was introduced as a pilot program in 2013-14. It funded two international digital media coproductions: one was an Experimental stream project and one was Convergent. Expanding from this pilot coproduction incentive, three new incentives were implemented in 2014-15. The incentives target both Experimental and Convergent digital media projects. The new incentives are co-ventures with foreign funders, a result of a global outreach for coproduction partners on behalf of Canadian producers. The first is the Canada-New Zealand Digital Media Fund, which partnered with NZ On Air on three Experimental coproduction projects. The second is the Canada-Wallonia Digital Media Incentive for Multiplatform Projects, which partnered with Wallimage of Belgium in the development of two Experimental projects. The foreign partners contributed a total of $654,000 to projects funded by the Canada Media Fund (CMF). Thirdly, the Digital Media Codevelopment & Coproduction Incentive funded five projects in both Convergent and Experimental streams, with coproducers from the United Kingdom, France, Colombia, and Denmark.

For more information, please see: http://ar-ra13-14.cmf-fmc.ca/funding/convergent/intl_co_prod/

The CMF is also a partner in the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction. The Framework is the result of consultations with the industry with a goal of accessing new opportunities and partnerships. It recognizes and promotes international coproductions specifically in digital media between Canada and other countries. The partners in the Framework seek to encourage international cooperation and to foster global brand management strategies for multiplatform content and digital media properties. They are: the Bell Broadcast and New Media Fund, the Independent Production Fund, the Quebecor Fund, Shaw Rocket Fund, as well as the CMF.

For more information, please see: http://www.cmf-fmc.ca/documents/files/programs/2016-17/apps/cnv/dm-int-co-pro-framework.pdf

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Media Fund’s (CMF) support for international digital media coproductions, including the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction, is expected to facilitate coproductions between Canadian and foreign producers by increasing access to funding and easing the negotiation process. The CMF will continue to support the production costs of future digital media coproductions, encouraging international partners to work with Canadian producers to create innovative and interactive digital media. The Framework will streamline the funding process, as international coproduction partners will be able to apply for several funds at once. As a result, the number of digital media coproduction partnerships is also expected to increase.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Media Fund
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

In the 2014-15 fiscal year, the Canada Media Fund (CMF) Funding, International Digital Media Coproduction and Codevelopment Incentives totalled $972,000 CAD.

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
The Bell Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Bell Fund is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. The Fund encourages and funds the creation and development of excellent Canadian digital/TV multi-platform projects, and its mandate is to advance the Canadian broadcasting system. It has invested in the production of digital media and new media projects associated with television productions since 1997, and has five digital media funding programs.

The Bell Fund is a not-for-profit organization, certified by the CRTC as an independent production fund eligible to receive and administer contributions from broadcast distribution undertakings. It is governed by a nine member Board of Directors operating as an arms-length corporation with representatives from broadcasting, the television and digital media production sectors and from Bell TV and its affiliates.

Name: 
The Independent Production Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Independent Production Fund, created by various independent broadcasters, is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. The Fund was established in 1991 by Maclean Hunter Limited, and has since become independent of any parent company. It offers a Web Drama Series funding program.

Name: 
The Quebecor Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Quebecor Fund is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. Founded in 1999, the Quebecor Fund contributes to the development of Canadian content production and simultaneously promotes the use of new broadcasting models. It offers two programs: the Main Television Production Assistance Program (MPAP) and the Event and Film Production Assistance Program (EFPAP), which cover interactive digital media components. To date, through the Main Television Production Assistance Program (MPAP), and the Event and Film Production Assistance Program (EFPAP), the Quebecor Fund has helped producers and distributors produce several high quality projects that have been broadcast on over 33 different Canadian networks. The Quebecor Fund is a non-profit organization incorporated as a company.

Name: 
The Shaw Rocket Fund
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Shaw Rocket Fund is one of the five funds available for producers applying to the Digital Media Coproduction Framework. The Shaw Rocket Fund, working in partnership with youth, is dedicated to investing in the Canadian children’s and youth production industry with a broader mission of championing Canadian children’s programming in Canada and around the world.

The Shaw Rocket Fund is a permanent, independently governed, not-for-profit corporation that provides equity financing for the production of high quality Canadian children’s, youth and family programming. The Rocket Fund is a continuation of Shaw Communications’ ongoing commitment to Canadian children’s programming. It is the largest private funder dedicated to Canadian children’s media for independent producers. Since 1998, the Shaw Rocket Fund has invested $127 million in 529 children’s programs.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The activities of the Canada Media Fund over the period between 2010 and 2014 were evaluated by the Evaluation Services of the Department of Canadian Heritage. While the Canada Media Fund’s support for international digital media coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction were not the subject of a distinct evaluation, they were included in the overall evaluation. Please see the measure “Canada Media Fund” under the section “Cultural Policies” for the main conclusions and indicators of the evaluation.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Please see the measure “Canada Media Fund” under the section “Cultural Policies” for the main conclusions and indicators of the evaluation.

❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Caribbean Cluster Initiative for Animation Outsourcing and Intellectual Property Development

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The objective of this measure is to build the capacity of the Caribbean Animation Cluster to deliver world class animation services, and in doing so, to establish the Caribbean as a competitive supplier of animation production and post-production services.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Regional Animation cluster (Barbados, Jamaica) of the Caribbean Cluster Initiative for Animation Outsourcing and Intellectual Property Development is a sub-project of Compete Caribbean. Compete Caribbean is a private sector development program that provides technical assistance grants and investment funding to firms and entrepreneurs to take a chance on an innovative, risky business idea in an attempt to improve the revenue performance and competitiveness of the firm. The program is jointly funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and the Government of Canada.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected results of this measure are an increased capacity and capability of the cluster members to bid on international outsourcing animation projects, and increased activity in promoting and marketing their services globally.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Global Affairs Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total project cost is $630,800 USD (Compete Contribution: $500,000 USD).

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
Type of Entity: 
Private company
Type of Involvement: 

The involvement of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is financial, as well as strategic support.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Quebec: Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec agreements under the UNESCO- Aschberg program

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

From 1994 to 2014, the CALQ participated in the UNESCO-Aschberg program. This bursary program offered creation residencies in literature, music and visual arts to artists aged 25 to 35 in developing countries to give them the opportunity for personal growth through contact with other cultures. The program also helped facilitate the mobility and exchange of artists and cultural professionals in order to improve their expertise through training, exchanges and hospitality.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The CALQ participated in this program by providing grants to Quebec organizations that bring young artists on board. The CALQ notably associated itself with La Chambre blanche organization to support bringing artists from Francophone African countries on board for a residency in network and web arts production. The purpose of the artistic project was to explore the various possibilities of digital technologies, such as interactivity, participatory art, hyperlinks, sound exploration, processing still or moving images, etc.

From 2011 to 2014, Musique Multi Montréal, along with the Amis d’Ahuntsic-Cartierville (Babel Musique) also brought foreign artist on board as part of this program.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

As part of the UNESCO-Aschberg program, the CALQ supported Quebec organizations’ bringing on board seven foreign artists from 2011 to 2012 and 2014 to 2015.

In addition to that number, La Chambre blanche brought artists on board from Francophone African countries, including Cameroon and Burkina Faso. Musique Multi Montréal brought two artists on board from Togo and Madagascar. Babel Musique also brought one artist on board from Mexico.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
CALQ
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

2011-2013: $CAD 51,6K

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
La Chambre blanche
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Founded in 1978, La Chambre blanche is an artist-run centre with a mandate to promote experimentation and dissemination in the field of visual arts. More specifically, this mandate hinges around a reflection of installation and site-specific practices, within three avenues: dissemination, production and documentation. The centre has had its own artist-in-residence program since 1982.

Name: 
Musique Multi Montréal
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Musique Multi Montréal was founded in 1991 and its mandate is to make artists from here and elsewhere from all backgrounds known through a process to connect and mix cultures using music as a means of communication. In November 2013, the organization put a definitive end to its activities.

Name: 
Babel Musique
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Babel Musique was created to promote creation stemming from all the cultures of the world and to increase knowledge exchanges stemming from the world’s musical heritage. The organization is dedicated to developing music and its creators and produces its big Babel event annually, which encourages combining different styles, cultures and aesthetics. The organization is also partners with the Ahuntsic Cultural Centre, which is known in the country as a crossroad for the music of the world.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
No
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program from the Canada Council for the Arts encourages social and community environments that support the development of Aboriginal arts and artistic practices. It aims to foster unique artistic relationships and networks through inter-nation collaborative exchanges among Aboriginal artists, across all disciplines.

The objectives of this program are to:

  • ensure the transmission of artistic knowledge and expertise to cultivate the vitality of Aboriginal arts;
  • foster the development and ongoing skills enrichment of Aboriginal arts professionals;
  • encourage interaction and expertise-sharing between Canadian Aboriginal artists of various communities and also with international Indigenous communities; and
  • support the inter-nation and intergenerational transmission of Aboriginal artistic knowledge and expertise.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program provides support for Aboriginal artists to travel to other Aboriginal communities to collaborate in a traditional or contemporary artistic practice. This is a multidisciplinary program that is open to individual Aboriginal artists, arts groups, artists’ collectives and arts organizations.

In general terms, the program supports collaborations that are:

- Creative: Two artists or groups of artists creating a work together.

- Developmental: The development of artistic skills and techniques among participants, the advancement of traditional or contemporary artistic knowledge, and the formalized exploration of artistic themes.

- Exploratory and Research: Artistic research with Aboriginal communities to recover, examine, and authenticate traditional histories and artistic practices (while respecting each Aboriginal nation’s affirmed protocol).

One example of this program’s reach took place in 2011, when Iroquois Arts received a grant through the program to create new music in a workshop format with the Akamba Women Singers from Kyanzasu, Kenya.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/grants/find-a-grant/grants/aboriginal-peoples-collaborative-exchange-national-and-international-project-grants 

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program is expected to help create unique artistic relationships and networks through inter-nation collaborative exchanges among Aboriginal artists, across all artistic disciplines. Other expected results include:

  • The efficient transmission of artistic knowledge and expertise to cultivate the vitality of Aboriginal arts
  • The development and ongoing skills enrichment of Aboriginal arts professionals
  • Greater interaction and expertise-sharing between Canadian Aboriginal artists of various communities and also with international Indigenous communities
  • Better inter-nation and intergenerational transmission of Aboriginal artistic knowledge and expertise
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total grant amount for the Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program in the 2013-14 fiscal year was $235 400 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The Aboriginal Peoples Collaborative Exchange: International program was evaluated within a broader program evaluation of the Council’s suite of 15 Aboriginal Arts programs. This specific program was not evaluated individually. The conclusions were not specific to this program, but addressed questions about the entire suite of Aboriginal Arts programs.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Generally, for the evaluation of all Aboriginal Arts programs, the following relevant indicators were used:

  • Artists can better express their artistic and cultural identities.
  • Opportunities for artists to engage with communities are supported.
  • Communities hold events to showcase Aboriginal art.
  • Artists collaborate with other artists.
  • Artists participate in gatherings, festivals, and exchanges.
  • Artists have access to knowledge to support their practice.
  • Artists access skill development opportunities.
  • Works of art support cultural identity.
  • Career opportunities for Aboriginal artists are enhanced.
  • Artists collaborate with artists in other communities.
  • Aboriginal art in all forms is present in the public environment.
  • Arts organizations of all kinds engage with Aboriginal artists.
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Dance Presentation Program: Support to Presenters

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Dance Section of the Canada Council for the Arts considers presenters of dance to be essential connectors in the Canadian dance ecology. The Dance Presentation Program offers financial support to organizations that present dance works to the Canadian public, with the aim of:

  • encouraging creative risk-taking in dance programming and creating a more dynamic environment for dance presentation in Canada;
  • contributing to the development and vitality of the art form;
  • extending, deepening and enriching existing relationships and cultivating new partnerships among local, national, and international artists and presenters;
  • increasing creation, performance and visibility opportunities for professional dance artists and companies; and
  • enhancing audience engagement and appreciation of dance.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/grants/find-a-grant/grants/dance-presentation-program-support-to-presenters

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Dance Presentation Program has six components: Foreign Artists’ Tours, Commissions/Co-productions, Creative Residencies, Visiting Dance Professionals, Choreographic Workshops/Labs and Strategic Collaborations.

The Foreign Artists’ Tour component provides support to Canadian presenters of dance that host a Canadian tour of a foreign artist, company or collective. Over 10 foreign professional artists were able to tour in Canada through support from this program between 2010 and 2014. Among them were artists from Cuba, South Africa, and Taiwan.

The Visiting Dance Professionals component provides support for Canadian presenters of dance to invite out-of-province, out-of-territory, or international dance professionals to facilitate workshops or conduct master classes for professional artists.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Dance Presentation Program is expected to help develop existing relationships and lead to new partnerships between Canadian and international artists and presenters by enabling Canadian presenters to invite foreign dancers to Canada. This will not only increase visibility and opportunities for foreign dancers, but also expose Canadian audiences to a greater variety of dance.

The goals of the program are to enhance programming options for Canadian presenters, encourage dialogue between members of the Canadian and international dance milieux, cultivate mutual exchange and collaboration between Canadian and foreign presenters, and ensure that international dance works are performed for the benefit of Canadian audiences.

As one example, in 2014, Vancouver-based presenter The Firehall Arts Centre coordinated a five-city tour of South African dance artist Vincent Mantsoe. The engagement reached multiple cities across Canada including Vancouver, Ottawa, Peterborough, Montreal and Toronto. Audience dialogue and talkback sessions were organized in Vancouver and Toronto, and special outreach was undertaken to reach the South African communities. This cross-Canada tour was important in offering Canadian audiences exposure to culturally diverse work. Amongst the Canadian presenters, Dance Immersion has a specific focus on dance from the African diaspora, and Montreal Arts Interculturels focuses on Indigenous and culturally diverse works. The other presenters are mainstream Western Contemporary presenters and this initiative diversified their programming.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total grant amount for Support to Presenters program in the 2013-14 fiscal year was $420 250 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Visiting Foreign Artists Program

Context of the measure: 
PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Visiting Foreign Artists program from the Canada Council for the Arts provides grants to Canadian professional arts organizations to encourage visits by individual professional foreign artists of outstanding achievement. Organizations may invite an individual artist from any foreign country.

The Visiting Foreign Artists Program assists arts organizations in welcoming artists from other countries to Canada. Successful projects demonstrate that there is a great advantage in looking at artistic and audience development in terms of exchange and reciprocity. The increased understanding of international perspectives that comes from cross-cultural artistic exchange is a wider cultural benefit of this program.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Under the Visiting Foreign Artists program, grants are available in fixed amounts which range from $500 to $3,000. While in Canada, the visiting foreign artist is to direct workshops, teach master classes for professional artists and/or – in the fields of inter-arts, media arts, visual arts, theatre, writing and publishing – give artist talks.

The following foreign artists were able to come to Canada through the support of the Visiting Foreign Artists Program:

- In 2012, Ola Khalidi, founder of Makan Space in Amman, Jordan, an independent contemporary art centre that encourages experimentation in concepts and production, presented to the Institutions by Artists: the Convention on the specific opportunities and challenges of artists’ self-organization practices in the Arab world. She also contributed to the Institutions by Artists book that was published leading up to the event in 2012.

- In September 2013, Shanghai artist Chen Hangfeng came to Canada for a two-week residency to present his Garden of Invasive Species at Gendai Gallery in Toronto. This project reflected on issues of immigration, politics and human dominance over nature.

- In June 2014, OBORO GOBORO in Montreal hosted Colombian multidisciplinary artist Waira Nina, in collaboration with OKINUM, to give a master class at OBORO, and to coincide with the 9th International Encuentro of Performance and Politics in the Americas.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/grants/find-a-grant/grants/visiting-foreign-artists-program

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Visiting Foreign Artists program is expected to help Canadian professional arts organizations to be able to host more foreign artists from a variety of countries, and to allow Canadians to learn from diverse artists who are outstanding in their fields.

The increased understanding of international perspectives that comes from cross-cultural artistic exchange is a wider cultural benefit of this program.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total grant amount for the Visiting Foreign Artists program in the 2013-14 fiscal year was $126 250 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

Tremplin NIKANIK program to assist First Nations francophone filmmakers

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) is a federal cultural agency within the portfolio of the Department of Canadian Heritage. Its mandate is to reflect Canadian values and perspectives through the production and distribution of innovative Canadian audiovisual works accessible in the relevant media of today. The Tremplin program was originally designed to help emerging filmmakers in francophone minority communities create a first or second professional documentary. The selected participants would benefit from professional guidance at each step of the production and would have access to the NFB’s expertise. The films produced were broadcast on Ici Radio-Canada Télé.

In 2012-13, the National Film Board expanded its Tremplin program to offer a pilot initiative specifically designed for First Nations francophone filmmakers in Quebec. Called Tremplin NIKANIK, this joint venture with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) aimed to give aspiring filmmakers the chance to make a short first or second documentary film, gain valuable hands-on screenwriting and production experience while working with respected industry professionals. The program was intended to increase opportunities for First Nations francophone filmmakers by providing them with an educational experience during which they could make key connections with members of the industry. As well, the documentary film created through participation in the Tremplin NIKANIK program would be broadcast across Canada by the APTN, which would expose the film to a wider audience and increase recognition for the filmmaker.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Tremplin NIKANIK was a contest for aspiring First Nations francophone filmmakers. It was composed of two stages: the first was the development stage, where candidates’ submissions were evaluated by a jury. The chosen candidates received a screenwriting contract from the Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinema (SARTEC) and spent two to four days in writing workshops. Candidates were then supported by a consultant for a period of seven to nine weeks while they developed their script. Following this, a finalist was chosen and proceeded to the production stage; their documentary was produced and distributed by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB), and was broadcast on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN).

For more information (in French only), please see: http://blogue.onf.ca/tremplin-nikanik/

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Tremplin NIKANIK competition was expected to add to the many works produced by the National Film Board with Aboriginal filmmakers and creators from all regions of the country, and strengthen the contribution being made by Aboriginal communities in the film sector by stimulating audiovisual creation and production.

After the first competition, the winning short documentary film “Le chemin rouge” was produced by the up-and-coming director, Thérèse Ottawa. The film was launched in 2015 at the Montréal First Peoples’ Festival. It was then presented at numerous festivals across Canada and the United States.

For more information, please see: https://www.nfb.ca/film/red_path/

 
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The National Film Board of Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The financial resources allocated to the competition were $70 500 CAD, and the production of the short documentary film cost $87 000 CAD.

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Aboriginal Peoples Television Network
Type of Entity: 
Private company
Type of Involvement: 

The APTN broadcast the winning documentary which was produced by the National Film Board of Canada as a result of the Tremplin NIKANIK program, allowing it to be seen by audiences across Canada. “Le chemin rouge” was broadcast on June 13th, 2016 by the APTN.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Local
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The NIKANIK competition was the subject of an internal evaluation. Although the first short documentary film produced through this program was presented at the main Aboriginal festivals (the Montréal First Peoples’ Festival and ImagiNATIVE in Toronto) and was broadcast by the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN), the initiative as a whole did not spark the recipient’s career, and the National Film Board’s objectives were not met.

The influence and range of the competition did not appear to be sufficient enough to renew it the following year. A new activity, bringing together seven Aboriginal artists from different nations, is in development and will be produced in November of 2017. The objective is to create a structuring initiative with more influence, and a range that goes beyond networks and events which are primarily linked to Aboriginal communities.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The indicators used to determine the impact were: the locations of the broadcast, the attracted audience, and the impact on the career of the director.

❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

National Forum on Literary Arts

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

To address the shifting literary landscape, in 2014 the Canada Council for the Arts worked with the literary community to create an unprecedented multisectoral and Canada-wide conversation about these changes: a National Forum on Literary Arts. The objectives of the Forum were to galvanize the literary arts community and its stakeholders around a shared vision, and to work on a blueprint for the future. Designed along the lines of a summit conference, the forum featured two days of meetings and discussions intended to work towards a positive vision for the future of Canadian literature. Its purpose was to better understand the ecology and unique challenges of the milieu and to allow the extended community to exchange best practices and ways forward.

The event was organized around four themes: creation, publication/production, dissemination and sustainability. The idea for the Forum arose out of the widely shared observation that the world of literature and publishing is far from immune to the upheavals caused by the current digital age. Neither fully understood nor integrated into the practices of the community, these changes, which are currently taking place to varying degrees, will intensify, making it a good time for the Canada Council and stakeholders to look at the questions raised by the changing dynamics of the Canadian literary milieu. For example: what does an author expect of her publisher today? How is access to books evolving with the technological revolution? How is the democratization of publishing seen? How are reading habits changing?

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/writing-and-publishing/national-forum-on-the-literary-arts

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

In mid-2013, the Canada Council assembled a Partners committee of provincial and territorial funding agencies and a Steering committee of 20 peers from the literary milieu, and hired two consultants to help manage the project. The Partners committee members were selected from the Canadian Public Arts Funders (CPAF) network. Their role was to provide advice and guidance on the Forum and to ensure that a broad range of delegates would participate. The Steering committee was tasked with setting the Forum’s objectives and devising the program, and worked diligently to develop the objectives and prepare the theme documents with the goal of sparking lively discussions at the Forum.

In February of 2014, some 250 people representing various sectors of the industry gathered in Montréal to develop a roadmap to respond to changes in the sector, identify future paths for sustainability and provide tools to adapt to new emerging models. The Forum was a valuable opportunity for participants to share their thoughts, ideas and questions about the future of the literary arts in Canada in stimulating and interactive sessions. There were two speakers, as well as roundtables on the themes of creation, production/publication, dissemination and sustainability.

After the Forum, the Canada Council presented its report and developed a plan for continuity and follow-up, so that ideas related to the themes and results can be shared to maintain an ongoing dialogue.

The summary report on the Forum may be accessed here: http://canadacouncil.ca/~/media/files/writing%20and%20publishing/national%20forum%20on%20the%20literary%20arts%20-%20report.pdf

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected result of the forum is that the literary community will unite around a shared vision and work on a blueprint for the future. The forum was seen as the first step in what is hoped to be an ongoing dialogue on the future.

For information see: http://canadacouncil.ca/~/media/files/writing%20and%20publishing/national%20forum%20on%20the%20literary%20arts%20-%20report.pdf

One of the main recommendations from the Forum was that the community was to continue the dialogue. In addition to some informal regional discussions, a notable follow-up to the National Forum was the Canadian Writers’ Summit, held June 15-19, 2016 in Toronto. This conference was jointly hosted by a cohort of Canadian writer organizations, which are listed at the following address: http://www.canadianwriterssummit.com/english/#/partners/. To continue the discussions from the National Forum, the summit programming included: professional development sessions, keynote talks, pedagogy and policy discussions, scholarly presentations, public lectures, and networking opportunities.

For more information, please see: http://www.canadianwriterssummit.com/english#/about/

 

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The total cost of the National Forum on Literary Arts, not including the expenses for the Steering committee, was $270,488 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

The Year of the North

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

2012-13 was named the Year of the North by the National Arts Centre (NAC), and its initiatives focused on building upon already-established relationships with Northern Aboriginal artists and developing sustainable culture-sharing initiatives. The initiative celebrated the artistry and heritage of the extraordinary talent of Northern Canada by touring the North with the NAC Orchestra, by expanding the Music Alive educational program, and by staging the biggest showcase of Northern artists that Canada has ever seen during the Northern Scene festival.

The NAC Orchestra tour and the Music Alive program offered a many opportunities for the Orchestra to encounter promising young artists and to introduce them to incredible music teachers. The connections established during the Year of the North will lead to meaningful relationships that will continue for many years.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Year of the North included three activities: the continued expansion of the Music Alive educational program, a tour by the NAC Orchestra, and a festival to celebrate northern culture.

In 2010, the NAC’s Music Alive Program expanded to include remote communities in Nunavut, with a focus on developing long-term music education initiatives in three Qikiqtani communities: Iqaluit, Igloolik and Pangnirtung. The program also made an impact across communities of the Far North with workshops and training for young musicians, encouraging music-making and building students’ capacity to preserve northern music.

The NAC has developed strong relationships with northern artists, boards of education and communities. The partnerships forged have led to professional musicians working with youth, the donation of instruments to northern communities, community concerts showcasing northern musicians and celebrating Inuit music, music workshops for teachers-in-training, the funding of summer music camps and youth leadership summits, and distance-learning through broadband videoconference technology.

In 2012, the NAC Orchestra and guest artists toured for 10 days through rural communities in northern Canada. In advance of the tour, the NAC Orchestra received permission to transcribe ancient Inuit ayaya songs for Western instruments, which had been nearly forgotten during the time of assimilation policies and residential schools. The NAC helped to preserve Inuit music and highlighted its cultural value. The educational component of the tour included masterclasses, individual coaching, Q&A sessions, and workshops.

In 2013, the NAC hosted Northern Scene, a 10 day arts festival in the National Capital Region, featuring 355 diverse northern artists and art forms. It is hoped that the legacy of the festival will continue for many years to come.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

It is hoped that the initiative will help to preserve Inuit music and highlight its cultural value, as well as lead to a continued relationship between the National Arts Centre and northern Aboriginal communities.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The National Arts Centre
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

Culturat

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

CULTURAT is a widespread mobilization and sustainable development effort to significantly affect the Abitibi-Témiscamingue area with arts and culture, notably through:

1. the beautification of the area through art, flowers and green spaces;

2. bringing people together, notably through the social inclusion of Algonquin communities;

3. showcasing the area’s local products with a view of sustainable development;

4. highlighting culture through education authorities, notably by developing worksheets and workshops;

5. awareness of the business sector and the importance of culture and the arts;

6. promoting arts and culture in urban planning and managing public spaces marked by culture;

7. sharing information and knowledge, and inviting people to participate as citizens via the culturat.org website;

8. the mobilization of all the sectors around arts and culture with a view of sustainable development, notably through creating committees and advisory boards.

CULTURAT creates a strong synergy between culture and the other sectors (municipalities, businesses, cultural and tourist organizations, schools, Algonquin communities, media and citizens) which enables culture to become a significant factor in tourism, social, environmental and economic development in the region. By doing this, the attractiveness of the region is also going up for its citizens, tourists and those who have yet to arrive while strengthening residents’ attachment to the land and cultural diversity.

CULTURAT is in line with the principles of Agenda 21 for Culture and includes all community spheres to mark the area using arts and culture, as well as focus on cultural development to improve the quality of life.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Through CULTURAT, it was possible to implement tools to foster community understanding, adherence and action for this widespread movement based on sustainable development for the cultural sector:

- Designing the unique www.culturat.org website and having it go live to facilitate networking with the cultural sector (Répertoire des artistes et organismes);

- A list of 10 actions to be carried out under CULTURAT to all sectors of activity, a calendar of cultural activities in the area, models of contracts to hire local artists, guides, pricing charts, etc.;

- Signing the participation charter, which marks the commitment of 53 municipalities (out of 65 in the region), along with all the Algonquin communities chambers of commerce in the region, as well as several organizations;

- Support the creation of local committees through CULTURAT in certain municipalities in the region to make it easier to carry out projects based on arts and culture;

- Encourage citizen participation through a “Participe au décor” outdoor space beautification contest;

- Campaign to promote the process with citizens in the region in order to position the movement. By wearing blue, people are visually showing that they adhere to CULTURAT;

- Campaign to promote cultural tourist attractions and invite citizens from the region to take advantage of these sites;

- “Mon été CULTURAT” contest with citizens in the region, with the goal of discovering the region’s cultural products;

- Creation of an Anicinabe cultural circle with the goal of uniting the seven communities in the area to make known and showcase the Anicinabe culture;

- Establishing the Fonds CULTURAT pour la ruralité to allow the rural areas to promote artistic and cultural activity in the area by professional artists.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Thanks to CULTURAT, a widespread mobilization effort has begun, a communal action strategy between municipalities and the area has been developed, and many sectors of society have become involved, all while integrating arts and culture into the various areas of life. The ultimate objective is to mark the area with arts and culture in both rural and urban sections. The following aspects have been noted:

- an increase and improvement in cultural tourism activities;

- increased visibility for the region;

- increased “positive” media coverage by establishing a community strategy based on mobilization;

- stronger Aboriginal presence in Algonquin communities in carrying out CULTURAT projects;

- a contribution to pride in Anicinabe culture by showcasing it

- strong ties to the area by the resident population and training cultural ambassadors;

- stronger presence in social networks and on the regional products website;

- a more flowery and welcoming environment.

 

In terms of cross-sectoral impacts, CULTURAT:

- encourages cultural diversity by better integration of Algonquin community members in the cultural dynamism of the region;

- helps to improve the quality of life;

- maintains environmental integrity through beautification and flowers;

- encourages municipalities to join in citizen participation, along with public and private cultural development partners;

- helps to strengthen ties between culture and education;

- population retention because of the region’s increased attractiveness for tourists;

- accentuates sustainable development by encouraging local purchases.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The material, financial and human resources allocated to the mobilization of Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue has grown to nearly $CAD 700,000 since 2012. These amounts do not include the works of art on buildings that belong to businesspeople, or even green spaces in municipalities. Furthermore, sponsorships from local media (newspaper, television, radio) allow us to reach every home, and thus far, the amount has increased to over $600,000.

g. Name of NGOs and/or private companies engaged in the implementation of the measure, if any: 
Name: 
Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue (TAT)
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue (TAT) is a not-for-profit corporation that acts as the main coordinator of the CULTURAT project, notably providing the development officer on duty as well as the marketing team and communication strategy teams about the project. TAT also creates links as needed to encourage cooperation in the community by acting as a facilitator.

Development consultations for open spaces, events and festivals, cultural tourism, hospitality and snowmobiling are working with peers in each sector as well as the various related organizations to develop quality, competitive products in addition to promoting the touristic product of Abitibi-Témiscamingue outside the region.

Name: 
Le Conseil de la culture de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue (CCAT)
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The Conseil de la culture de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue (CCAT) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to regional cultural development. As part of CULTURAT, the CCAT acts as a key stakeholder in culture, provides networking tools (cultural calendar, artists directory, art boutiques, etc.), promotes these efforts with its members and shares its cultural expertise. Many other organizations also actively participate in this process, notably the five chambers of commerce in the region and the school boards.

Name: 
53 municipalities and 7 signatory communities
Type of Entity: 
NGO
Type of Involvement: 

The 53 municipalities and 7 communities that signed for their areas work together on the CULTURAT project. They are leaders in the field and in turn will encourage many partners’ adherence to the project. By signing the charter, they committed to carrying out actions to work towards the objectives of the process. They are also, in many cases, providing additional funds to carry out special projects under CULTURAT.

 

The MCC is participating financially in the process to document it, while the Ministry de Tourisme agreed to prioritize cultural tourism development in Abitibi-Témiscamingue under the Entente de partenariat régional en tourisme 2012-2015. Members of both Parliament and Provincial Parliament also support this process.

 

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Under the recommendation of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, a partnership was established between Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue and the Université du Québec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue to scientifically document CULTURAT and notably make it easier to analyze and improve it. These documentation efforts on the origins and implementation of CULTURAT did not undergo formal evaluation, however.

Administrators are currently involved in strategic planning to ensure the continuity of this process, which will have to involve a more structured analytical review on the actions carried out thus far.

After CULTURAT has been implemented for a few years, it is obvious that local governments will mobilize around culture to increase synergy, empowerment and the combined effort of many stakeholders in the area to better draw on the regions’ cultural assets. CULTURAT ensures that small communities have better management over their own cultural resources by compensating for the lack of cultural policies and isolation. Furthermore, an increased quality of life has a direct influence on the region’s attractiveness and retention capacity—two major factors for local governments that are currently experiencing closures of many regional and municipal bodies.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Professionalization of artists:

By encouraging networking between the world of arts and culture and other sectors (economic – business, tourism, academia, Aboriginal, municipal, etc.) CULTURAT is directly contributing to the professionalization of artists and the development of work opportunities through better knowledge of the cultural sector.

 

Number of projects carried out:

Over 100 projects have been carried out with professional artists, and this also provides the opportunity for better retention of artists in the region, even though the area is quite removed from large cultural centres.

 

Improving quality of life:

By making the area stand out through an artistic arrangement and stimulating the community in a very particular way, CULTURAT is actively participating in improving citizens’ quality of life.

 

Intraregional promotion:

The intraregional promotion of CULTURAT allows residents to have a better overall view of what is going on in their area and a better understanding of their cultural assets, thereby increasing their feeling of belonging, rootedness and pride.

This is a series of indicators that university researchers can use at a later date to determine the actual impact.

❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL

Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT NATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF), provided by the Government of Canada, seeks to contribute to the improvement of physical conditions for the arts and heritage related to creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The CCSF also aims to increase and improve access for Canadians to performing arts, visual arts, media arts, and to museum collections and heritage exhibitions. The goal of the CCSF is to provide Canadians in all regions, including underserved communities, with access to new or improved arts and heritage spaces in their communities for creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The CCSF provides grants and contributions for arts and heritage infrastructure projects across the country to improve facilities and infrastructure requirements for the arts and heritage.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

To achieve its objectives, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF) provides financial assistance in the form of grants and contributions for construction and renovation projects, specialized equipment purchases and feasibility studies for professional, not-for-profit arts and heritage infrastructure projects.

In 2014-15, the CCSF supported 73 projects in 42 communities. Examples of these projects include the expansion of the Musée d'Histoire, d'Ethnographie et d'Art Religieux de Nicolet (Québec), the acquisition of specialised equipment for Théâtre de la Pire Espèce in Montréal, Québec, improvements to the Ontario Jewish Archives Foundation, and the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation's video archive project in Iqaluit, Nunavut. As well, the CCSF was used to support the Surrey Art Gallery's Urban Screen in British Columbia. This 30 metre by 10 metre screen uses projectors mounted on re-purposed towers to project digital art onto the side of a building, and is viewed by up to 30,000 people daily as they enter and exit Surrey's SkyTrain station.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected result of the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund is that arts and heritage organizations in communities across Canada, including rural communities, will have the necessary resources to build and improve cultural facilities and infrastructure. Improved facilities are a sustainable way to ensure that all communities have spaces in which to promote and appreciate culture, both in the present day and for years to come.

In 2014-15, 66% of approved projects targeted at least one underserved community. In particular, 20.5% of supported organizations served Aboriginal communities, 26% served ethnocultural communities, 9.6% served official language minority communities, and 46.6% served young audiences.

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Canadian Heritage
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

In 2014-15, budgetary financial resources for the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund totalled $28,587,103 CAD.

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation focused on the period from 2007-08 to 2012-13 was conducted for three programs, including the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF). The core issues addressed were: relevance and continued need, alignment with government priorities and with federal roles and responsibilities; and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy.

The CCSF has contributed to new and improved arts and heritage facilities and infrastructure across a variety of disciplines and a range of communities. An average of 97 projects were funded per year, which resulted in improved access to, and quality of, a variety of arts and heritage experiences for Canadians. About half of the 63 communities that receive CCSF funding in an average year are rural or remote.

The evaluation found that the CCSF has contributed to new and improved arts and heritage facilities and infrastructure across a variety of disciplines and communities. The regional presence of Canadian Heritage contributes to the success of the program by facilitating understanding of local needs and demands as well as the development of close collaborations with regional partners. The major findings of the evaluation regarding the CCSF are as follows:

  • Between 2007-08 and 2011-12, 487 cultural infrastructure projects were funded which resulted in new or improved arts facilities (an average of 97 projects per year). The number of projects funded was higher in 2009-10 (134), compared to other years, due to the additional funding received through Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
  • The projects funded under the CCSF consist of construction and renovation projects, specialized equipment projects, and feasibility studies.
  • For 2010-11 and 2011-12, construction and renovation projects accounted for 43% of the projects and 72% of the funding awarded while specialized equipment projects and feasibility studies for prospective construction or renovation projects accounted for 57% of the projects and 28% of the funding awarded.
i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

A variety of arts and heritage experiences are available in a wide range of communities:

  • Diversity of supported projects (artistic disciplines, heritage function, underserved communities)
  • Funded projects service communities in all regions that vary in size

Arts and Heritage organizations can better create, present, preserve, and exhibit arts and heritage experiences:

  • Number and nature of activities have been maintained and/or enhanced (number, quality, variety, self-reported)

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-PCH2-PCH-InstitutionalProfile/STAGING/texte-text/2014_Grouped_Arts_Evaluation_1453817656247_eng.pdf

 
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL

Quebec: Agenda 21 for Culture for Quebec: international component

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Internationally, the theme of integrating culture with sustainable development is inciting more and more interest. Many organizations, including UNESCO, UCLG and the IOF are interested in this issue. In Quebec, the implementation of Agenda 21 for Culture (A21C) hinges on an international component with the aim of recognizing the importance and the role of culture in sustainable development internationally.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Quebec has participated in several international events to make known the importance of integrating culture into sustainable development, in addition to its efforts.

For example:

  • On November 22 and 23, 2012, the French and Quebec ministries of culture came together to organize the International Symposium in Paris: Culture and Sustainable Development (link available in French only). The objective of the Symposium was to present international thinking and identify courses of action (link available in French only) to promote better integration of culture in sustainable development initiatives. The Symposium was open to the public, and in total over 330 artists, researchers, experts, cultural and sustainable development professionals, policy makers and representatives of international organizations attended to align thinking and action in order to highlight innovative practices, create new partnerships and reflect on strategies for better acknowledgment and to establish a more concrete link between culture and sustainable development.
  • The Ville de Montréal participated in holding a debate on culture and development at the United Nations (UN) General Assembly in New York in June 2013.
  • During a special demonstration organized by the IOF and UNESCO in New York on May 6, 2014 with the theme of culture as the economic driving force behind development: experience and success, the Government of Quebec presented the A21C and the initial results of the Chantier gouvernemental en culture.
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Recognition of the importance of the role culture plays in sustainable development.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MRIF, the MCC and cities in Quebec who are active internationally are responsible for implementing this measure.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL

CARICOM Education for Employment Program (C-EFE)

Context of the measure: 
INTEGRATION OF CULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - AT INTERNATIONAL LEVEL
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The purpose of the CARICOM Education for Employment Program is to support the economic development of the Caribbean region through the strengthening of its technical and vocational education and training system, which includes building skills for employment. One of the sub-programs being developed is a two year Associate Degree Level III program in the cultural/creative industries, which will be used by colleges across the Caribbean region.

This program is part of Canada’s overarching objective for the Caribbean Region in promoting sustainable economic growth, through:

  • Strengthening the management of public financial resources, including debt management;
  • Increasing access to employment skills for youth;
  • Strengthening the productivity of small and medium-sized enterprises and increasing participation in regional and global markets;
  • Promoting public-private partnerships that generate employment and attract investment for growth; and
  • Creating an enabling and predictable environment for economic growth through increased capacity and accountability of public institutions and by fostering a more competitive private sector.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Education for Employment Program is an institutional partnership between the T.A. Marryshow Community College in Grenada and the Nova Scotia Community College in Canada.

Funded by Global Affairs Canada and managed by the Association of Canadian Community Colleges, this measure provides support to the T.A. Marryshow Community College to help develop a two year Associate Degree Level III program in the cultural/creative industries. Support includes curriculum development and teacher training to deliver competency based training. A second institution, Garmex HEART Academy in Jamaica, will also benefit from this partnership. The resulting Associate Degree program will be eligible for Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ). When approved as a CVQ, the curriculum can be used by any community college in the region to offer a similar program. 

In 2014, the Caribbean Regional Development Program was confirmed as a country/region of focus for the Government of Canada's international development efforts. Canada supports the development agenda established by CARICOM to achieve regional cooperation and integration.

Fourteen countries in total – 11 island states (Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago) and three continental ones (Belize, Guyana, and Suriname) – are served by Canada's Caribbean Program under which this measure was developed.

Canada's long-term goal in the Caribbean region is to help build a more prosperous and integrated Caribbean community, one that is able to generate sustainable economic growth.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Education for Employment Program is expected to contribute to an increase in the economic development of the Caribbean region through the strengthening of its technical and vocational education and training system, including skills for employment.

For example, the Caribbean Program’s achievements for 2012-13 with respect to economic growth include:

  • Supporting improvements in public institutions, which helped two out of six countries complete medium-term debt management strategies and trained 64 Caribbean workers in loan negotiations.
  • Supporting and financing the first-ever inclusion of the Caribbean in the World Bank’s “Enterprise Surveys”, the results of which provided policymakers with previously unavailable data on the state of doing business in the Caribbean.
  • Improving the access to finance among micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) by providing technical assistance to the Institute of Private Enterprise Development, the largest microfinance institution in Guyana.
  • Providing technical assistance in support of legislative reform and institutional strengthening related to public-private partnerships.
  • Providing funding for 13 public-private dialogue events in the region with a focus on challenges to growth and on ways to overcome them.
  • Playing an instrumental role in the development of the new CARICOM Regional Strategy for Technical Vocational Education and Training for Economic Competitiveness and Workforce Development.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Global Affairs Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

CDN $440,000 from Global Affairs Canada and CDN $172,000 from the Nova Scotia Community College.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b

Quebec: Digital technologies

Context of the measure: 
EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

b. Key Objectives of the Measure (max 2100 characters)

The Government of Quebec has given several presentations at international forums, including the IOF and UNESCO, so that the impact of digital technologies is taken into consideration in the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions.

In April 2015, the MCC, in collaboration with the MRIF, implemented a working group on digital technologies and the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions with the purpose of:

  • documenting the issues, challenges and opportunities for Quebec represented by the impact of digital technologies of the diversity of cultural expressions;
  • establishing Quebec’s position in relation to the issue of operational directives on digital technologies, including their possible content, format and relevance;
  • reviewing any other legal or non-legal instrument that could be adopted by Convention representatives to adjust to the implementation of the Convention in a digital environment;
  • sharing Quebec’s good practices and expertise in the cultural and digital sector with UNESCO.

Taking the new digital reality into consideration is at the heart of many of the MCC’s interventions, along with those of state-owned enterprises who work in the cultural sector (Télé-Québec, the SODEC, BAnQ, CALQ, etc.). Interministerial collaborations are also being established on this issue, notably with the MRIF.

 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
Regional
National
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan (QDCP) was launched in 2014. It included over 50 measures for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. QDCP helps cultural environments go digital so that Quebec continues to count on this significant support for its economy and remain competitive in international markets.

At the same time, the web magazine, video distribution channel and specialized cultural network (La Fabrique culturelle [available in French only]) launched by Télé-Québec in 2014 is also a tool for showcasing Quebec culture.

Until 2012-2013, the CALQ offered the digital platforms and networks measure with the goal of implementing digital networks and platforms to build partnerships and support the emergence of projects. In 2014-2015, this measure was replaced by three measures included in QDCP:

  • support for the creation and development of original, digital, cultural content, notably to foster the creation of original artistic content on La Fabrique culturelle;
  • support for digitizing artistic and literary content so that organizations can digitize, disseminate and make more online content available.
  • Support for the deployment of digital infrastructures that notably promotes pooling resources and expertise.

The SODEC implemented a digital/interactive advisory committee including representatives of businesses or organizations that work in the digital sector to receive information on community needs while programs related to digital technologies are developed.

BAnQ designed a web portal (available in French only) that provides access to digitized heritage documents from national libraries that are members of the RFN.

One of the objectives of Agenda 21 for Culture for Quebec (link available in French only) is to develop and promote creativity by integrating culture into innovation policies and facilitating the arts, literature and cultural industries sector’s adjustment to the Internet and the new digital reality.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Not available.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MCC, CALQ, SODEC, BAnQ and Télé-Québec are responsible for implementing these measures.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
Yes
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b

Canada Council for the Arts’ Deaf and disability arts strategy: Expanding the Arts 2012

Context of the measure: 
EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The barriers which may prevent Deaf Canadians and Canadians with disabilities from equally engaging in the arts are complex, systemic and diverse. Lack of access, whether it is physical, sensory or in decision-making, is a connected yet separate issue from promoting and recognizing Deaf arts or disability arts. Furthermore, promoting and ensuring equal opportunities for Deaf Canadians or Canadians with disabilities to engage in the arts is an issue which is directly influenced, affected by and dependent on the entire arts ecology.

Expanding the Arts is a strategy created by the Canada Council for the Arts which aims to develop better internal processes and measures to counter systemic barriers experienced by Deaf artists and artists with disabilities and those working in deaf arts and disability arts sectors. These processes also aim to advance the Council’s knowledge of the diverse Deaf arts and disability arts communities, artistic practices and changes in these milieux. Furthermore, this strategy aims to foster and promote greater opportunities for Canadians who are Deaf or who have disabilities to enjoy and engage in the arts.

The Canada Council has a history of embedding values of equity within its operations. The practice of linguistic duality, the investment in regional artistic institutions, the creation of the Aboriginal Arts and Equity Offices, as well as equitable practices within policy development, grant programs and processes, have all contributed to its diverse and vital arts ecology. The Council has equity policies that cross the whole organization as well as dedicated programs for arts communities facing sizable barriers to arts production and access.

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/research/find-research/2012/expanding-the-arts-deaf-and-disability-arts

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

In keeping with the Canada Council’s commitment to equity, diversity and inclusive policies, it was determined that developing a strategy on Deaf and disability arts specific to the Canada Council was a priority. The strategy provides definitions, background and context, including Canadian and international legislation, and information about the Council’s consultation process.

To achieve its objectives, the strategy prioritizes three main focus areas, with specific goals for each area:

1. Increasing access, support and participation in Canada Council programs

- The Council and its programs are accessible to artists, arts professionals and arts organizations.

- Deaf people and people with disabilities participate and are supported throughout the Council, and its staff is comfortable and conversant with access support and protocols.

2. Recognizing, supporting and promoting Deaf and disability arts

- The artistic practices of Deaf artists and artists with disabilities are supported and advanced through Canada Council programs.

- Increased opportunities to Deaf artists and artists with disabilities in arts organizations.

- Knowledge and social discourse are raised on the topics of Canadian Deaf and disability arts.

3. Encouraging the public engagement of Canadians who are Deaf or who have disabilities in arts and culture

- Increased engagement in the arts for Canadians who are Deaf or who have disabilities. 

For more information, please see: http://canadacouncil.ca/council/research/find-research/2012/expanding-the-arts-deaf-and-disability-arts

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Expanding the Arts is an important step forward for the Canada Council for the Arts in terms of reaching its overarching commitment to contribute to, advance and support a vital and diverse arts ecology. Through this strategy, the Council will be better able to recognize and serve the breadth of Canada’s artistic communities, and remove barriers to arts funding support. Ultimately this will ensure that Council funding gives maximum impact and value to all Canadians.

There have already been successful partnerships between the Canada Council and artists who are Deaf or who have disabilities, allowing these artists to successfully apply for and receive funding for their projects. For example, in 2014 a unique arts organization called “Spill” (“Propagation” in French) from Gatineau, Québec, received Council support for a five-day forum hosted by internationally-renowned artist Jolanta Lapiak. The forum’s objective was to identify and construct a new art practice from the perspective of Deaf people. Spill also received support from the Council’s Leadership for Change program to do research to strengthen its organizational model.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Canada Council for the Arts
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Between 2011 and 2014 the Council awarded a total of $1,992,989 CAD in grants to Deaf and disability arts organizations and individuals. In addition, $284,082 CAD was awarded in access support, which was identified as a strategic priority in the Expanding the Arts strategy. Access support is a supplement provided to successful grant recipients who are Deaf or have disabilities and who identify specific access requirements which are related to barriers faced in their proposed artistic activities and/or as part of travel. The purpose is to assist arts professionals who have access-related needs to complete their proposed activity.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b

CBC/Radio-Canada: National public broadcasting in the digital age

Context of the measure: 
EMERGING TRANSVERSAL ISSUES: Resolution 5.CP 9b
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Conventional broadcasting is in flux as audience behaviours, advertising models and methods of production shift quickly. The profile of the industry is also changing: availability of foreign content is exploding; technology is transforming the industry; and consumer expectations, habits and demographics are transforming the marketplace.

CBC/Radio-Canada is the national public broadcaster. It operates television, radio and online media services, delivering predominantly Canadian content in English, French, eight aboriginal languages and its international service in five languages. Public broadcasting continues to play a crucial role in Canada and around the world. CBC/Radio-Canada invests a greater percentage in Canadian content compared to the largest private‐sector Canadian broadcasters, in this way providing a home for the creation and discovery of Canadian content.

Launched in June 2014, CBC/Radio-Canada’s 2020 strategy A Space for Us All is designed to provide the national public broadcaster with the agility and stability needed to navigate a rapidly evolving media environment. The strategy aims to position CBC/Radio-Canada to thrive now, as well as in an age beyond traditional broadcasting. A Space for Us All includes four objectives:  

  • Through distinctive content, increase and deepen engagement with Canadians, and inspire them to participate in the public space.
  • Change the infrastructure to allow increased simplicity, flexibility, scalability, and collaboration.
  • Build a culture of collaboration, accountability, boldness, action, and agility, with a workforce that reflects the country.

Achieve sustainable financial health, including the ability to invest in the future.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The plan A Space for Us All focuses on the following elements:

1. More digital

Currently, television and radio platforms are the primary focus. By 2020, CBC/Radio-Canada will transform the way it is delivering its services to maximize engagement and modernize its offering. It will continue supporting conventional services and the audiences and revenues it currently attracts, while also shifting to mobile and digital platforms in terms of resources, audiences and revenues. 

2. More local

The strategy aims to maintain existing geographic presence and evolve CBC/Radio-Canada’s service by offering content specific to the needs of each region. It intends to provide more local information, using digital technology to make it affordable and timely. As part of the Corporation’s digital strategy, it has shifted its focus to deliver local content through mobile and web platforms first, then radio, then television. In this way, local services can be tailored to the specific size and needs of each community.

3. More distinctively Canadian

CBC/Radio-Canada believes that “programming needs to be contemporary and distinctly Canadian. Entertainment content will be a significant area of increased investment. Prime‐time entertainment titles are the biggest drivers of audience and revenue on conventional television. They are powerful vectors of culture and help create a shared national identity. They also have the best chance of becoming breakout hits, which then drive consumption of non‐news content on digital platforms.”

For more information, please see: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/_files/cbcrc/documents/explore/transforming/a-space-for-us-all-summary-v12-en.pdf

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Corporation’s strategy will reduce fixed costs and shift investments from support services, real estate and traditional broadcast infrastructure, to providing high‐impact Canadian content, including news and entertainment, progressively adapting to audience preferences through an even greater focus on digital and mobile across all genres.

CBC/Radio-Canada will fulfil its mandate by accelerating a fundamental transformation that will make it more scalable and sustainable; and in so doing, able to better withstand the challenges that lie ahead and take advantage of opportunities as they emerge.

CBC/Radio-Canada has set for itself two goals that symbolize the ambition of A Space for Us All:

  • By 2020, CBC/Radio-Canada will have doubled its digital reach. One out of two Canadians, 18 million in total, will use its digital services each month.
  • By 2020, three out of four Canadians will answer that they have a strong attachment to their public broadcaster.

For more information, please see: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/_files/cbcrc/documents/strategy2020/public-space-jan2016-short-version.pdf

 
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/Société Radio-Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY

Quebec: 2.6.1 2011-2015 Government Action Plan on Gender Equality

Context of the measure: 
CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The 2011-2015 Government Action Plan on Gender Equality stems from the 2006 policy for gender equality entitled Turning Equality in Law into Equality in Fact. The Plan includes 26 ministries and organizations, as well as nine collaborating ministries and organizations and 102 actions that fall under seven broad guidelines. Half of those guidelines are in keeping with the previous 2007 action plan, while the other half are new. The Secrétariat à la condition féminine (SCF) is responsible for coordinating follow-up on the implementation of the policy and action plan.

The purpose of this plan is notably to promote egalitarian models and behaviour, to move towards achieving gender equality in the economic arena as well as greater participation by women in decision-making bodies and gender equality in all areas, based on their specific circumstances.

The 2011–2015 Action Plan on Gender-based Analysis (link available in French only) is used as a governing instrument. The objective of gender-based analysis is to integrate gender equality concerns into their ways of doing things and decisions made by government authorities.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
Regional
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Several measures included in the 2011-2015 Governmental Action Plan are directly or indirectly related to culture. The following are examples of some of the measures:

  • Measure 4: Make a directory of cultural-educational resources free of sexual and sexist stereotypes available to specialists and resource persons: the purpose of this measure is to ensure that the Répertoire de ressources culture-éducation offers young people in elementary and secondary school cultural activities that are free of sexual or sexist stereotypes.
  • Measure 17: Annually disseminate a cultural piece for creators to promote equal models and behaviour: the purpose of this measure is to encourage artists from various sectors to create a work of art to convey egalitarian behaviour and models and then disseminate those works of art throughout the population and to targeted groups of young people.
  • Measure 89: Achieve parity among women and men on the boards of directors of state-owned enterprises and ensure that parity is maintained: the objective of this measure is to ensure compliance with the Act respecting the governance of state-owned enterprises, which set the deadline to achieve parity among men and women on boards of directors for all state-owned enterprises for December 14, 2011, and that also stipulated that this parity must be maintained from that date forward.
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The following results were achieved for each of the measures. For full results, see the report on the Government Action Plan on Gender Equality (available in French only).

Measure 4:

  • A gender-based analysis of cultural activities for young people in the Répertoire de ressources culture-éducation was carried out;
  • A new evaluation criterion was introduced for artists’ and writer’s projects in order to offer activities free of sexual or sexist stereotypes;
  • The jury took this criterion into consideration in their work.

Measure 17:

  • 17 pieces on the theme of gender equality were disseminated as part of the L’égalité à l’œuvre competition, including 11 two-dimensional pieces, three short films and three songs.

Measure 89:

  • In 2012, of the 60 large corporations targeted by the strategy, women made up 18.8% of boards of directors, while in 2013, women represented 20.2% of those boards. Those corporations notably included the CALQ and BAnQ.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The SCF, MCC, MEES, Ministère des Finances du Québec and the Secrétariat aux emplois supérieurs are responsible for implementing this measure.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY

Commitment from the National Film Board of Canada that 50 percent of its production budget will go to films directed by women

Context of the measure: 
CURRENT UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITY: GENDER EQUALITY
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

On March 8, 2016, the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) announced that it will be ensuring that over the next three years, half of its productions will be directed by women and half of all production spending will be allocated to films directed by women.

In making this commitment, the NFB is working toward growing the number of women in Canadian media, both on-screen and behind the scenes, and building on its leadership role in women’s cinema in Canada.

The issue of gender equality in film has been a longstanding issue within the industry. For instance, the non-for-profit organization Women in View released a 2015 report that stated that, in the Canadian film industry, only 17 percent of directors, 22 percent of writers, and 12 percent of cinematographers were women in a sample of 91 feature films made in 2013 to 2014.

For more information, please see: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/en/press-room/press-releases-media-kits/?idpres=21439

 
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

This commitment will be integrated over the next three years to ensure that gender equality is established as the status quo by 2019. This will involve the implementation of tools to monitor and track gender representation in all National Film Board of Canada (NFB) projects in 11 studios, including an internal process to keep track of gender in all key positions (director, writer, producer, editor, and director of photography). All recorded information will be posted annually on the NFB website to ensure transparency and accountability.

The NFB's spending for the 2015-16 fiscal year was for 43.4 percent of productions directed by women and 43.5 percent for films directed by men (with 11.3 percent for mixed-gender teams and 1.8 percent not allocated). Those numbers for women were up from the previous year (2014-15) which was 41.7 percent for women and 47.8 for men.

Currently, fifty-five percent of the NFB’s producers and executive producers are women, with 66 percent of upper management and 70 percent of NFB board of trustee positions held by women.

Among the diverse films produced by the NFB, some of its notable films by female filmmakers include, but are not limited to, Sarah Polley’s ‘Stories We Tell', Alanis Obomsawin’s ‘Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance’, and Mina Shum’s ‘Ninth Floor’. This effort is a contemporary extension of the NFB’s pioneering Studio D efforts in 1974, which devoted itself to films by women. New female-directed films coming up soon from the NFB include Alethea Arnaquq-Baril’s ‘Angry Inuk’, Andrea Dorfman’s ‘160 Girls’, and Ann Marie Fleming’s ‘Window Horses’.

For its next periodic report in 2020, Canada will report back and provide further information on the implementation of this newly announced measure.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The result expected from this commitment is that the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) will achieve gender parity in its productions and in the allocation of its production spending. The NFB reported that in 2016-17, the numbers are projected to be well above that. However it recognized that numbers can fluctuate as there have been good years and lean years for women’s filmmaking at the NFB.  The ongoing commitment to full gender parity announced by the NFB is also designed to help to lead the way for the film industry as a whole. For its next periodic report in 2020, Canada will report back and provide further information on the implementation of this newly announced measure.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
National Film Board of Canada
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ YOUTH

New Brunswick Artist-in-Residency Program for Schools

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Province of New Brunswick, through the Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture and the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, offers an Artist-in-Residency program for schools. The Artist-in-Residency School Program places professional artists in rural and urban schools to broaden and develop the arts education program by bringing together the creative potential of students and the unique energy of artists. It is intended to provide students and their teachers with the opportunity to spend a minimum of three days working closely with artists in order to enhance the students’ artistic perception and appreciation.

The objectives of the Artist-in-Residency program are:

  • To encourage and provide opportunities for students to express themselves and take part in the creative process at the earliest possible age and throughout every stage of their formal education;
  • To allow students to think creatively and critically through education in the arts;
  • To offer students the possibility to work with professional artists while actively participating in artistic projects in the context of their academic curriculum;
  • To help students develop a better appreciation of culture and the arts as well as local artists;
  • To witness a live performance, demonstration or exhibit by a professional artist; and
  • To encourage students to be creative from the time they are very young, which is one of the best guarantees of self-fulfillment, self-respect and the respect of others, all essential components of a culture of tolerance and peace.

For more information, please see: https://www.pxw1.snb.ca/snb7001/e/1000/CSS-FOL-SNB-22-0062E.pdf

 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Artist-in-Residency School Program funds art projects which are based on curricular outcomes within the Fine Arts and are a collaboration between one or more teachers and one or more artists. Schools work with professional artists in a variety of disciplines to provide students with meaningful opportunities to create, produce, participate in, and learn from the arts. To apply to the program, schools must initiate a project together with a professional artist or artists in any of the following artistic disciplines: music, dance, theatre arts, literature (playwriting, storytelling), plastic arts, and media arts such as film and video. Each residency must include a performance or live demonstration by the artist or artists, as well as a minimum of 15 hours of hands-on practice for the students.

Schools may receive up to $3,000 per residency. Five residencies per fiscal year per school district may be selected.

For more information, please see: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/services/services_renderer.201088.Arts_-_Professional_Artists_-_Artist-in-Residency_School_Program_Grant.html

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Artist-in-Residency School program is expected to expose youth to a variety of art forms while learning from a professional artist.

The program’s target outcomes are the following:

  • Students will gain a new level of appreciation for the arts combined with an increased level of understanding of the Fine Arts curriculum matter targeted by the residency;
  • Students will think creatively and understand deeply as they explore and develop their creative abilities while applying them in a variety of ways;
  • Students will think divergently and creatively while communicating effectively through the arts;
  • Students will manage, access, process, evaluate and present information aesthetically for a variety of audiences;
  • Students will be able to use various art forms, skills, language and techniques as a means of formulating, exploring and expressing ideas, perceptions and feelings.
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture of New Brunswick
The Department of Education and Early Childhood Development of New Brunswick
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Not available.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ YOUTH

Alberta’s Future Leaders Program

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Alberta Foundation for the Arts (AFA) and the Alberta Sport Connection (ASC) administer the annual Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) program for Indigenous youth. The AFL program was developed from the fundamental belief that “working together, we can make a difference,” and its vision is to work in partnership with communities to positively affect the lives of Indigenous children and youth. The program’s mission is to promote active, vibrant Indigenous communities, where local sports, recreation, arts and leadership experiences inspire youth to become positive leaders. The AFL program has partnered with 43 Indigenous communities across Alberta to create over one million participant hours of programming since its inception in 1996. There are currently 12 Indigenous communities that participate in the AFL program each year.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) program provides arts, sports, recreation and leadership opportunities to help strengthen and empower youth who live in Indigenous communities in Alberta. Mentors are selected by the program organizers before the beginning of every summer, and are trained extensively to prepare them for their roles. Mentors are young adults who come from a variety of backgrounds, and who can serve as positive role models for the youth participating in the program. Over the course of the summer, mentors develop and lead arts, sports and recreation programs, as well as camps, trips, and special events to teach the youth important life skills. Select future leaders from each host community are brought together to share ideas and learn new skills. This intercultural opportunity helps the youth create strong friendships and develop their leadership potential.  Upon returning home, most participants help the AFL Mentors to run programs, and many continue to serve their communities long after the summer ends.

The Arts Branch of the program selects and trains Mentors, and provides financial, moral and cultural support.  The Arts Mentors live in an Alberta Indigenous community from May to August each year. Arts Mentors deliver art programming in the form of art workshops, projects and instruction in a variety of arts disciplines. An integral component of the AFA arts programming is contracting Senior Artists (established Indigenous artists) to offer workshops in the communities. Senior Artists are important role models for Indigenous youth. They inspire confidence, teach leadership skills, and an appreciation for the arts, and build the self-esteem of participants. It is often a highlight for Indigenous youth to participate in arts projects alongside role models from their culture.

For more information, please see: http://www.affta.ab.ca/Arts-In-Alberta/Albertas-Future-Leaders

 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) program is expected to continue inspiring Indigenous youth to become positive leaders in their communities and beyond, through mentorship and new experiences in local sports, recreation, arts and leadership. The program has helped many youth aged 9-25 to build confidence, overcome barriers and realize their potential by providing them with new experiences, positive role models and opportunities. Youth who have been involved in the AFL Program are often inspired to complete high school and many continue on to pursue a post-secondary education in a variety of fields. For example, former AFL participants have gone on to become Chiefs, council members, youth workers, artists in a variety of arts disciplines, teachers, lawyers, participants in national sporting events, and many have continued to engage in arts and sports activities, projects and programs.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Alberta Foundation for the Arts
The Alberta Sport Connection
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Alberta Foundation for the Arts (AFA) allocates $140,000 CAD to the AFL Program and the Alberta Sport Connection (ASC) allocates $347,000 CAD.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Local
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

The Alberta Futures Leaders program was evaluated by a Provincial Support Committee. The main conclusions of the evaluation include:

  • More Indigenous communities are providing sport and recreation programming.
  • Indigenous communities have increased capacity to develop and deliver sport and recreation programs.
  • Barriers to sport and recreation opportunities have been reduced in Indigenous communities.
  • An increased number of Indigenous youth is participating in sport and recreation programs across Alberta.
  • More communities are providing culturally relevant programming.
  • Indigenous communities value community development and recognize the benefits of sport and recreation.
  • There is an increased capacity to develop and deliver sport and recreation programs in Indigenous communities.
  • There is increased community collaboration in the development of sport and recreation programs.
  • More communities, organizations and associations incorporate traditional Indigenous culture into outdoor programming.
  • Volunteering is valued and increased in Indigenous communities.
  • There is an increased number of provincial associations working with Indigenous communities.
  • There is an increased presence of Indigenous communities at sport, recreation and events across Alberta.
  • More Indigenous communities utilize available opportunities (e.g. professional development, funding, etc.) for sport and recreation.
  • There is increased coordination between the Ministries involved in Indigenous programming
  • More Indigenous youth participate in high performance and sport activities.
i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Immediate outcomes were used, such as:

  • Sport and recreation opportunities are accessible by Alberta Future Leaders (AFL) Youth
  • AFL Mentors have the opportunity to develop skills related to sport, recreation and community development, as well as cultural awareness
  • AFL youth have the opportunity to develop skills that contribute to an active lifestyle
  • AFL youth have opportunity to learn about Indigenous cultures, community engagement, outdoor sport and recreation, as well as traditional Indigenous activities
  • AFL communities are aware of the benefits of volunteering and community development
  • AFL Mentors and youth have the opportunity to develop leadership skills in their communities
  • The AFL program provides opportunities to engage community members
  • AFL communities are aware of the benefits of collaboration
  • Provincial associations are aware of the benefits and opportunities available to work with Indigenous communities
  • AFL communities are aware of resources and opportunities that are available (e.g. funding, professional development)
❭ YOUTH

BC Creative Futures Strategy: Creative Youth Initiatives

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Announced in January 2013, the BC Creative Futures Strategy was designed to develop and support BC’s next leaders in the creative economy by exposing school-aged children to creative activities and works, providing on-the-job skills and training in the creative sector and increasing youth engagement in the arts. The Creative Futures Strategy has three central goals: to increase skills training and participation in the creation, exhibition and performance of various art forms, to increase opportunities for engagement with art, and to increase opportunities to train and work alongside creative professionals.

The first part of the strategy is Arts Engagement for Creativity, a package of programs intended to support and assist youth and art students, with the goal of encouraging engagement in the arts and the growth of creative thinking in young people. The second part of the strategy is the establishment of Creative BC, an independent agency that is responsible for promoting the development of creative industries in British Columbia. The adoption of this cross-sectoral approach will encourage growth by creating a climate for business development and sustainability. The third part of the strategy, a one-time investment of $113 million to support a new state-of-the-art facility at the Emily Carr College of Art and Design, is also a part of the BC Jobs Plan, and is intended to help build on the province’s national and international reputation as a leader in media, creative arts and design. The expansion supports the BC government’s long term commitment to the arts and ensures that future generations have a place to hone their creative talents.

For more information, please see: https://archive.news.gov.bc.ca/releases/news_releases_2009-2013/2013CSCD0006-000156.htm

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Creative Futures Strategy consists of three parts:

1. Arts Engagement for Creativity

This is a $6.25 million package of new and expanded existing programs delivered by the BC Arts Council (BCAC), an independent agency supporting artists and cultural organizations, and the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development (MCSCD), which includes:

  • Creative Youth Initiatives – $2 million (BCAC)
    • The Youth Engagement Program supports innovative and inspiring approaches to actively engaging British Columbia’s young people with professional arts and cultural organizations and their programming.
    • The Early-Career Development Program helps bridge the gap for emerging and early career arts practitioners by providing support to build portfolio, professional exposure and/or career experience through co-op placement, internship, residency, and mentorship opportunities.
  • The After School Sport and Arts Initiative – $1 million (MCSCD)
  • Artists in Education Program – $1 million (BCAC)
  • Co-op Placement Program – $1 million (BCAC)
  • Scholarship Program – $750,000 (BCAC)
  • Artists in the Classroom Program – $500,000 (BCAC)

2. Strategic Vision – Creative BC (April 2013)

The establishment of Creative BC: an independent, non-profit society to engage government and the creative industries in a fresh partnership, and to provide a single point of access for industry professionals. Creative BC builds on existing government and industry partnerships in the creative sector.

For more information, please see: http://www.creativebc.com/

3. Support for Expansion at Emily Carr University of Art + Design

A total of $113 million was announced to help build a new visual, media and design facility at Emily Carr University of Art + Design's Great Northern Way Campus to ensure that future generations have a place to hone their creative talents.

For more information, please see: http://www.ecuad.ca/

 
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The BC Creative Futures Strategy is expected to spur further growth in British Columbia’s creative economy by supporting artists from a young age and enabling them to pursue a career in the arts. The long-term outcome of the strategy is expected to create a strong knowledge-based industry that values creativity and innovation, and that will support the success of the BC Jobs Plan. The strategy will lead to sustainable, long-term success for British Columbia’s creative sector. For example, since the introduction of Creative Futures:

- The number of students exposed to the arts through Artists in the Classroom has increased from 3,000 to over 15,000.

- According to the 2015 annual report by the Directorate of Agencies for School Health BC, the After School Sport and Arts Initiative has expanded to 181 schools with 6,715 unique participants.

- Since 2013-14, a total of 206 Early Career Development awards have been distributed.

- The British Columbia Arts Council has supported a series of youth engagement projects through unique relationships with arts and cultural organizations.

f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development
The British Columbia Arts Council
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

A total of $119.25 million CAD has been allocated to the implementation of this measure. $6.25 million has been assigned to Part One on an annual basis; of this total amount, $5.25 million will be contributed by the British Columbia Arts Council, and $1 million will be contributed by the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development. Emily Carr University was assigned a total of $113 million, provided by the Government of British Columbia.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ YOUTH

Quebec: Youth - Education and Culture

Context of the measure: 
YOUTH
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Quebec’s 1992 Cultural Policy made establishing links between education and culture a paramount objective. One of the guidelines is to improve arts and culture awareness and education. School is identified as an excellent way to access culture.

The Protocole d’entente interministériel Culture-Éducation, which unites the MEES and the MCC, stems from the Cultural Policy. The protocol was signed in 1997 and updated in 2013. Its purpose is to strengthen collaboration in school and cultural settings as well as integrate culture into school.

Colleges also contribute to developing Quebec’s cultural potential by the training professional development courses they offer in artistic and cultural fields. The internationalization of Quebec students’ training is supported through the Artistic and cultural college training international exchange support program (link available in French only), which offers financial support to public and private educational institutions to organize short-term international exchanges in artistic and cultural fields.

The MEES also offers the Promotion de l’enseignement collégial : productions étudiantes (link available in French only) program, which aims to help carry out special projects in certain fields, notably literature and the arts, through extra-curricular activities related to the student’s program of study or development. The objectives of this measure are to develop the student’s skills and creativity as well as help showcase colleges in their community.

Lastly, the CMADQ includes seven music schools as well as two drama schools. Its mission is to offer quality training.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
International
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Culture in the Schools program is one of the measures of the Protocole Culture-Éducation. Its objective is to produce citizens who are actively involved in cultural life by increasing the number of cultural experiences offered to pre-school, elementary school and secondary school students through collaboration with resources listed in the Répertoire de ressources culture-éducation (available in French only), which includes artists, writers and cultural organizations. Financial assistance is offered to schools to support them in carrying out these projects.

The program has two components:

  • Cultural workshops at school: This component makes it possible for artists to share their creative process with students during an in-class workshop.
  • Schools host an artist: Since 2013, this component has offered professional artists the opportunity to spend 4‑12 weeks in a school environment and find inspiration for their own creative pursuits, while allowing students to participate in a project involving artistic exploration.

The MEES also provides financial support to school board’s cultural committees who promote integrating culture into schools. In addition, February has been designated Cultural Activities Month and is an ideal time to hold activities to stimulate young people to undertake cultural projects that can be carried out in a subject taught at school.

The MCC offers the Mesure de concertation régionale en culture-éducation, which supports field trips to professional cultural organizations so that students can be introduced to culture outside of school and develop a taste in young people for professional cultural spaces.

The CMADQ administers music and drama schools for professional training as well as professional development for performers and creators. It is the only state-owned institution in North America that offers ongoing music training from the elementary school level up to the graduate level.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

As part of the Culture in the Schools program, 386,691 students participated in activities at school in 2012-2013. During that same year, 534,589 students participated in field trips. In 2014-2015, 32 projects were funded through the Schools host an artist program.

In 2014-2015, 16 projects were supported through the Promotion de l’enseignement collegial : productions étudiantes, which reached students at 72 colleges. For example, one project, Cégeps en spectacle, is a student contest with objectives notably to put college students in contact with various performance trades.

In 2013-2014, 68 students participated in exchanges through the Artistic and cultural college training international exchange support program. Through those projects, Quebec students participated in an improv tournament at the Festival des Lycéens d’Aquitaine in France with students from Germany, Italy, Romania and France.

The CMADQ admits about 800 music students and 75 drama students every year. It actively contributes to developing Quebec’s culture. The visibility of the school, in addition to the visibility of its teachers as well as past and present students, demonstrates the calibre of training it offers. The CMADQ contributes to regional and national vitality in several ways, notably through:

  • the CMADQ’s participation and involvement in youth orchestras from various areas of Quebec;
  • collaboration and partnerships with elementary and secondary schools to carry out musical projects for young people (concert band, etc.).
f.1 Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the measure: 
The MCC, MEES and CMADQ are responsible for implementing these measures.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

It would be impossible to present all the financial resources dedicated to culture and education for young people. Some data have been presented for information purposes.

In 2014-2015, $CAD 117.8K was allocated to the Promotion de l’enseignement collégial : productions étudiantes program.

Nearly $CAD 40K was allocated in 2013-2014 to the Artistic and cultural college training international exchange support program.

The CMADQ also received a nearly $CAD 28M grant from the Government of Quebec in 2014-2015.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No