Theme:
Advocacy, Status of the Artist, Contributing to the SDG's
Type of project:
Awareness Raising, Research and Data Collection
Start date
Apr 2020
End date
Ongoing

Context/Overview

ResiliArt sheds light on the current state of creative industries amidst crisis. Through virtual debates with key industry professionals and social media messages of resilience from artists, it raises awareness about the far-reaching ramification of COVID-19 across the sector and aims at supporting artists during and following the crisis.

Since the launch of the movement on 15 April, ResiliArt has been embraced by artists and cultural professionals around the world. The opinions expressed during ResiliArt sessions will be shared with governments, decision makers and the private sector so they may draw on this crowd-sourced wealth of knowledge to improve the existing support mechanism and build resilience in the cultural and creative industries. In order for culture to flourish during and beyond this crisis, we must take a well-informed, global action that reflects voices of those who were hit the hardest.

Cultural industry professionals are encouraged to join the movement and replicate the ResiliArt series in their respective regions and thematic focus by following publicly available guidelines. The devastation brought to the entire culture value chain will have a long-lasting impact on the creative economy; ResiliArt aims to ensure the continuity of conversations, data sharing, and advocacy efforts long after the pandemic subsides.

While ResiliArt is initiated by UNESCO, ResiliArt debates organized across the world are independent from UNESCO unless otherwise stated. Please note that opinions expressed during these discussions are not endorsed  by the Organization.

 

Upcoming ResiliArt

Thailand: “Challenges and priorities of the creative sector”, UNESCO Bangkok, Ministry of Culture, Creative Economy Agency (12, 19, 26 May)

Georgia: Creative Georgia (12 May)

Global: “Road to Recovery”, UNESCO with FICDC and CISAC (14 May)

Global: “ResiliArt Performing Arts – Dance beyond the Pandemic”, Global Foundation for the Performing Arts (15 May)

Iberoamerica: “Museums in time of pandemic – Innovation and perspectives”, UNESCO (15 May)

Algeria: Secrétaire d'État chargé de la production culturelle (16 May)

Yemen : UNESCO-EU Cash for Work Project (18 May)

Senegal: Africa Culture Consulting (18 May)

Germany: German Commission for UNESCO (20 May)

Cuba: UNESCO Havana (21 May – World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development)

Chad: Pan-African Cabinet of Consulting, Support and Management of Cultural Projects (22 May)

Republic of Korea: Korean National Commission for UNESCO, Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Korea

 

Inaugural debate

The inaugural debate took place on 15 April 2020, World Art Day, in partnership with CISAC.

It was opened by Audrey AZOULAY, UNESCO Director-General, who launched the ResiliArt discussions with Ernesto OTTONE R. (UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Culture), Jean Michel JARRE (Composer, performer, CISAC President and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador), Yasmina KHADRA (Author), Deeyah KHAN (Musician, documentary film director and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador), Angélique KIDJO (Singer-songwriter, CISAC Vice-President and UNICEF International Ambassador), Nina OBULJEN-KORŽINEK (Minister of Culture of Croatia and violinist) and Luis PUENZO (Film director, screenwriter, producer and President of INCAA).

This first ResiliArt debate covered pressing issues affecting the livelihoods of cultural professionals, including the social and economic rights of artists, copyright protection, digitization of content and freedom of expression.

While the impact of COVID-19 on the creative industries has become evident, panelists observed that policies and measures to alleviate the consequences have been slow to develop and underscored that government support for artists is essential. “Everybody is talking about opening the economy. We are part of the economy. The money we bring to the table is significant,” said singer-songwriter Angélique Kidjo. 

The deterioration of the status of the artist was raised as a major concern, with Jarre noting that the situation “threatens to send generations of creators into poverty.” According to Deeyah Khan, a musician and documentary film director, “Workers within this field do not, even under normal circumstances, enjoy the same level of protections and the same rights as many workers in other sectors. Today we are even more vulnerable, because our professions are not viewed as necessary.”

The discussion emphasized the importance of solidarity for artists and creators. Social-distancing measures have disproportionately affected vulnerable segments of the society, including artists.

ResiliArt

English
Photo Gallery: 
Countries: 
Algeria
Austria
Colombia
Egypt
Georgia
Honduras
India
Italy
Kenya
Mexico
Nigeria
Peru
Uganda
Date: 
2020
Context/Overview: 

ResiliArt sheds light on the current state of creative industries amidst crisis. Through virtual debates with key industry professionals and social media messages of resilience from artists, it raises awareness about the far-reaching ramification of COVID-19 across the sector and aims at supporting artists during and following the crisis.

Since the launch of the movement on 15 April, ResiliArt has been embraced by artists and cultural professionals around the world. The opinions expressed during ResiliArt sessions will be shared with governments, decision makers and the private sector so they may draw on this crowd-sourced wealth of knowledge to improve the existing support mechanism and build resilience in the cultural and creative industries. In order for culture to flourish during and beyond this crisis, we must take a well-informed, global action that reflects voices of those who were hit the hardest.

Cultural industry professionals are encouraged to join the movement and replicate the ResiliArt series in their respective regions and thematic focus by following publicly available guidelines. The devastation brought to the entire culture value chain will have a long-lasting impact on the creative economy; ResiliArt aims to ensure the continuity of conversations, data sharing, and advocacy efforts long after the pandemic subsides.

While ResiliArt is initiated by UNESCO, ResiliArt debates organized across the world are independent from UNESCO unless otherwise stated. Please note that opinions expressed during these discussions are not endorsed  by the Organization.

 

Upcoming ResiliArt

Thailand: “Challenges and priorities of the creative sector”, UNESCO Bangkok, Ministry of Culture, Creative Economy Agency (12, 19, 26 May)

Georgia: Creative Georgia (12 May)

Global: “Road to Recovery”, UNESCO with FICDC and CISAC (14 May)

Global: “ResiliArt Performing Arts – Dance beyond the Pandemic”, Global Foundation for the Performing Arts (15 May)

Iberoamerica: “Museums in time of pandemic – Innovation and perspectives”, UNESCO (15 May)

Algeria: Secrétaire d'État chargé de la production culturelle (16 May)

Yemen : UNESCO-EU Cash for Work Project (18 May)

Senegal: Africa Culture Consulting (18 May)

Germany: German Commission for UNESCO (20 May)

Cuba: UNESCO Havana (21 May – World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development)

Chad: Pan-African Cabinet of Consulting, Support and Management of Cultural Projects (22 May)

Republic of Korea: Korean National Commission for UNESCO, Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Korea

 

Section for activities: 
Title of the section: 
Inaugural debate
Short Description: 

The inaugural debate took place on 15 April 2020, World Art Day, in partnership with CISAC.

It was opened by Audrey AZOULAY, UNESCO Director-General, who launched the ResiliArt discussions with Ernesto OTTONE R. (UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Culture), Jean Michel JARRE (Composer, performer, CISAC President and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador), Yasmina KHADRA (Author), Deeyah KHAN (Musician, documentary film director and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador), Angélique KIDJO (Singer-songwriter, CISAC Vice-President and UNICEF International Ambassador), Nina OBULJEN-KORŽINEK (Minister of Culture of Croatia and violinist) and Luis PUENZO (Film director, screenwriter, producer and President of INCAA).

This first ResiliArt debate covered pressing issues affecting the livelihoods of cultural professionals, including the social and economic rights of artists, copyright protection, digitization of content and freedom of expression.

While the impact of COVID-19 on the creative industries has become evident, panelists observed that policies and measures to alleviate the consequences have been slow to develop and underscored that government support for artists is essential. “Everybody is talking about opening the economy. We are part of the economy. The money we bring to the table is significant,” said singer-songwriter Angélique Kidjo. 

The deterioration of the status of the artist was raised as a major concern, with Jarre noting that the situation “threatens to send generations of creators into poverty.” According to Deeyah Khan, a musician and documentary film director, “Workers within this field do not, even under normal circumstances, enjoy the same level of protections and the same rights as many workers in other sectors. Today we are even more vulnerable, because our professions are not viewed as necessary.”

The discussion emphasized the importance of solidarity for artists and creators. Social-distancing measures have disproportionately affected vulnerable segments of the society, including artists.

Position: 
Top left
Style: 
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