Building peace in the minds of men and women

World Science Day for Peace and Development

10 November

Open science, leaving no one behind

Celebrated every 10 November, World Science Day for Peace and Development highlights the important role of science in society and the need to engage the wider public in debates on emerging scientific issues. It also underlines the importance and relevance of science in our daily lives.

By linking science more closely with society, World Science Day for Peace and Development aims to ensure that citizens are kept informed of developments in science. It also underscores the role scientists play in broadening our understanding of the remarkable, fragile planet we call home and in making our societies more sustainable.

In 2019, the Day will be devoted to the theme of Open Science – a burning issue in the scientific community,  which is gaining increasing attention by the non‐scientific community as well. Let us embrace open science as a tool for making science more accessible, scientific process more inclusive and the outputs of science more readily available for all!

Join the conversation with the hashtags #ScienceDay and #OpenScience.

2019 theme: Open Science, leaving no one behind

Open Science is not only an issue of science being open to the research  community, as in “open access” and “open data”, but refers to a science open to society.  

In spite of the progress made in recent years, we are still witnessing great disparities across and within different regions and different countries when it comes to accessing science, technology and innovation (STI) and enjoying their benefits. To address these disparities and close the existing STI gaps, Open Science is an important step in the right direction. 

Open communication of the scientific data, results, hypotheses and opinions, lie at the very heart of scientific process. In this context, Open Science is the growing global movement to make scientific research and data accessible to all.
Open Science has the potential to significantly increase scientific collaboration and discovery and to facilitate adoption of the well‐adapted technologies. It can be a game changer for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, particularly in Africa, developing countries, and Small Island Developing States (SIDS). 

Let us embrace open science as a tool for making science more accessible, scientific process more inclusive and the outputs of science more readily available for all!

Fostering a global dialogue on open science

UNESCO is leading a global dialogue on Open Science, to ensure that Open Science practices meet their potential in bridging the world’s STI gaps and enabling sustainable development. The Member States of the Organisation have examined this issue in the UNESCO Executive Board:

 

Message by the Director-General

"The astonishing progress made by science in recent decades has changed our lives. Science and its countless applications now condition all aspects of human life. The resulting innovations are an opportunity for the development of our societies. They are improving our well-being, facilitating daily life and pushing back borders that seemed immutable in the fields of medicine, transportation, communication and knowledge-sharing. They are an engine of growth and wealth.
However, because science today is the beneficiary of the human intellect which has been seeking, exploring and inventing for centuries and millennia, it belongs to all humankind, it is a common good whose fruits must be of benefit to all."

— Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO
Message on the occasion of World Science Day for Peace and Development 2018

Full message in PDF format:
English ǀ Français ǀ Español ǀ Русский ǀ العربية ǀ 中文

Resources

Poster

 

 

 

What can you do?

The success of the World Science Day for Peace and Development will depend on the active involvement of many partners such as intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, scientific and research institutions, professional associations, the media, science teachers and schools.

Different activities will be undertaken to mobilize support for the objectives of the World Science Day for Peace and Development.

We invite you and your organization to celebrate this Day with some special events or action. Next, you can find a list of potential actions that can be undertaken by you and your organization:

  • SPREAD THE WORD

    • diffuse World Science Day for Peace and Development in your institution or in your town, city or local community, through municipal and state government channels.
    • incorporate the messages of World Science Day for Peace and Development into official speeches, publications and other activities taking place on 10 November.
    • contact national and local media (TV, radio, print, electronic) to highlight the importance of celebrating WSDPD at national and local level.
    • write articles and letters about the importance of science for sustainable societies to the media, including industry trade journals, organization newsletters, and school newspapers.
  • ORGANISE

    • an 'Open Day' in your institution to highlight the importance of science for peace and development.
    • classroom discussions to emphasize the many different ways science and technology touch our daily lives.
    • conferences and forums.
    • a science museum visit.
  • CONNECT

    • visit local schools to speak about careers in science, deliver scientific presentations or demonstrations to young students.
    • build classroom-to-classroom connections between schools via the Internet to talk about science projects that will interest young people.
    • find a sister institution and carry out a joint activity highlighting the importance of science.
    • invite university faculty to join with community organizations and schools to celebrate the Day.

We would be grateful if you could keep us informed on the activities you will organize in order to include your events on this website.
Please register your event in celebration of the Day using this form.

Contacts: a.sarcina@unesco.orgi.brugnon@unesco.org ; a.barbash@unesco.org

 

Science Centres and Science Museums around the world are celebrating the contribution of science for sustinable development on this day - join them for special events  on World Science Day for Peace and Development.

 

 

 

Science, a Human Right

Everyone has a right to participate in and benefit from science. We must find ways to improve access to science and to the benefits of science for sustainable development.

 

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected. Article 27 states that:

(1) Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.
(2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

UNESCO Recommendation on Science and Scientific Researchers

The UNESCO Recommendation on Science and Scientific Researchers is an important standard-setting instrument which not only codifies the goals and value systems by which science operates, but also emphasizes that these need to be supported and protected if science is to flourish. A first Recommendation was adopted in 1974, and a revised Recommendation was adopted on 13 November 2017, superseding the 1974 text. This Recommendation has a particular value today, including for developing countries in building up their scientific skills and institutions.

The Recommendation upholds the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights - that everyone has the right  to participate in and benefit from science - and provides a useful checklist of political and institutional requirements to ensure access to science education, and fundamental rights such as the right to be a scientists, to protect intellectual property, to share scientific advancements and accademic freedom.

 

 

Message from HRH Princess Sumaya bint El Hassan, UNESCO Special envoy for Science for Peace

"Science is our best hope for a bright and equitable future. The challenges are grave, and we must all work together to tackle them. We must share our knowledge and support one another so that we may realize our full protential as a human family."
— HRH Princess Sumaya bint El Hassan, UNESCO Special envoy for Science for Peace

Background

From the universe expanding to the phones in our pockets, science is everywhere. Each year, on 10 November, the World Science day for Peace and Development helps us remember this fact and offers an opportunity for everyone to engage in scientific debates and activities.

The Day marks an occasion to mobilize all actors around the topic of science for peace and development – from government officials to the media to school pupils. By linking science more closely with society, science is made accessible to all and broadens our understanding of the remarkable, fragile planet we call home. It becomes also a more solid stepping-stone towards making our societies more sustainable.

Since its proclamation by UNESCO in 2001, World Science Day for Peace and Development has generated many concrete projects, programmes and funding for science around the world. The Day has also helped foster cooperation between scientists living in regions marred by conflict, one example being the UNESCO-supported creation of the Israeli-Palestinian Science Organization (IPSO).

The objectives of World Science Day for Peace and Development are to:

  • Strengthen public awareness on the role of science for peaceful and sustainable societies;
  • Promote national and international solidarity for shared science between countries;
  • Renew national and international commitment for the use of science for the benefit of societies;
  • Draw attention to the challenges faced by science and raising support for the scientific endeavour.

Previous celebrations