Building peace in the minds of men and women

Congaree Biosphere Reserve, United States of America

The Congaree Biosphere Reserve comprises the last vestiges of old-growth bottomland hardwood forest in the eastern United States. The biosphere reserve is located in the gently undulating to flat floodplain of the Congaree River, representing a range of natural ecosystems which are typical of this vast coastal region.

Designation date: 1983

Networks

Regional network:  EuroMab

Ecosystem-based network: 

  

    Description

    Map

    Surface : 8,222 ha

    • Core area(s): 8,222 ha
    • Buffer zone(s): N/A
    • Transition zone(s): N/A

    Location: 33°45' to 39°45'N; 80°45' to 80°47'W
     

    Administrative Authorities

    David Shelley
    Congaree National Park, NPS
    United States of America

    Tel.: N/A

    Email: david_shelley@nps.gov

    Website ǀ Facebook ǀ Twitter

    Ecological Characteristics

    The biosphere reserve is located in the gently undulating to flat floodplain of the Congaree River, representing a range of natural ecosystems which are typical of this vast coastal region. The area also hosts several endangered animal species, including red-cockaded woodpecker (Dendrocopus borealis), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and bald eagle (Haliaetus leucocephalus).

     

     

     

     

    Socio-Economic Characteristics

    Water impoundment projects, upstream development activities, and potential sources of pollution in upstream watersheds pose the most serious threats to the health of the Congaree ecosystem. Parts of the biosphere reserve are used for recreational activities such as sports fishing, hunting and hiking. As part of the biosphere reserve, Congaree Swamp National Monument and Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge conduct public education activities.

     

     

     

     

     Back to Biosphere Reserves in United States of America
     Back to Biosphere Reserves in Europe & North America
     Back to World Network of Biosphere Reserves

     

    Last updated: July 2019