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Songor Biosphere Reserve, Ghana

Songor Biosphere Reserve is characterized by a unique combination of brackish / estuarine, freshwater and marine ecosystems with mangroves, islands and small patches of community protected forests. The site itself is a closed lagoon that is continually refilled by seepage, runoff, creeks, and streams. It is characterized by high salinity levels and surrounded by mudflats that are inundated for most of the year. It has a total population of 42,150 inhabitants. Reeds, fuel wood, tilapia, crab, and other game are harvested from the site on a mainly subsistence basis while salt is extracted for widespread distribution.

Designation date: 2011

Networks

Regional network:  AfriMAB

Ecosystem-based network: 

  

    Description

    Map

    Surface : 51,113.3 ha

    • Core area(s): 1,699.08 ha
    • Buffer zone(s): 7,822.03 ha
    • Transition area(s): 28,075.041 ha

    Location: Latitudes 06°00’ 25’’ N, 00°19’E and 05° 45’ 30 ’’ N, 00°41’ 40’’E

    Administrative Authorities

    Wildlife Division

    Nana Adu Nsiah
    P.O. Box: M239
    Accra - Ghana

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    Ecological Characteristics

    It consists of a shallow brackish water lagoon (10-50cm) with mudflats, The lower Volta River and its estuary and islands, a broad sandy beach southwards, flood plains with degraded mangroves and coastal savannah vegetation.

    The lagoon is low-lying. The maximum depth below mean sea level is 50 cm. There is a narrow sand dune along the coast with no cliffs on the smooth coastline.

    It has a total population of 42, 150 with 150 in the core area (0.3%), 11,500 in the buffer zone (27.3%) and 30,500 in the transition zone (72.4%). The units currently used to facilitate easy management are the lagoonal area, islands, marine area and estuary.

     

     

     

     

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    Last updated: October 2018