Well Trained Teachers to Elevate Quality of Education

06 August 2015

Experienced and skilled, “Supervisor” Fadia is one of the trainers that worked with QRTA (Queen Rania Teacher’s Academy) and UNESCO in the project ‘Sustaining Quality Education & Promoting Skills Development for Young Syrian Refugees in Jordan’: “I train fresh teachers and teachers in service on different subjects. Trainers face problems with in-service teachers because most of them think that they have experience, they are skilled, and they have no time or patience to spend on what they consider a repetition to things they know” explains the trainer. But there is also a great reward behind their work. Fadia explains to UNESCO how one of the teachers attending the training applied the new teaching techniques she learned in her training: “A teacher shared a day of her teaching life with me. She explained to me that she used to wake up thinking of the two Syrian students who sit at the back of her class unresponsive. But, after the training, this teacher gained new skills. “Supervisor” Fadia continues:...

Experienced and skilled, “Supervisor” Fadia is one of the trainers that worked with QRTA (Queen Rania Teacher’s Academy) and UNESCO in the project ‘Sustaining Quality Education & Promoting Skills Development for Young Syrian Refugees in Jordan’: “I train fresh teachers and teachers in service on different subjects. Trainers face problems with in-service teachers because most of them think that they have experience, they are skilled, and they have no time or patience to spend on what they consider a repetition to things they know” explains the trainer.

But there is also a great reward behind their work. Fadia explains to UNESCO how one of the teachers attending the training applied the new teaching techniques she learned in her training: “A teacher shared a day of her teaching life with me. She explained to me that she used to wake up thinking of the two Syrian students who sit at the back of her class unresponsive. But, after the training, this teacher gained new skills. “Supervisor” Fadia continues: “The trainee divided the class into groups and made sure to mingle Jordanians with Syrians. She prepared clear and easy tasks for her students to do. In her own words; her classes were no longer something that she dreaded or her Syrian students”Quality education is a key element for achieving sustainable development and to contribute to the resilience of the host communities affected by the Syrian crisis. This project, funded by the European Union, aims to address the challenges posed by the continuing influx of Syrian refugees on the quality of education in Jordan. The project builds upon UNESCO’s experience and commitment to strengthening national capacities of the education system through in-country skills, technical and capacity support in the field of sector-wide policies, development and organization. Therefore a teacher’s training was the first and most necessary activity to carry out since the project started. After the Syria crisis, teachers had to face new and unknown challenges in the classroom.

UNESCO is committed to working with the national authorities to cope with this new situation. UNESCO’s trainers, like “Supervisor” Fadia, explain some of the challenges that they faced during this teachers training: “For this project, I had to deliver a 5-day workshop with five different training topics. It was hard at first but I used hands on activities that helped teachers deal with all types of children, from all backgrounds. We moved from reluctant to attend, dull session into active lively training”

Funded by the European Union this project is part of the Jordan Response Plan and aims at promoting long-term support to Jordan’s efforts to address the adverse impact of the Syria crisis while maintaining quality education for all.