The Dorothy Hodgkin Symposium

When, local time: 
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 -
2:45pm to 8:00pm
Where: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Oxford
Type of Event: 
Церемония награждения
Contact: 
a.fahmi@unesco.org

The Dorothy Hodgkin Symposium is a one day event that aims to recognise Dorothy Hodgkin’s legacy and mark the award of her Nobel Prize. Her field, crystallography, underpins all of the sciences today and has an extensive range of applications within the agro-food, aeronautic, computer, electro-mechanical, pharmaceutical and mining industries and more.

45 scientists have been awarded the Nobel Prize over the past century for work that is either directly or indirectly related to crystallography, and yet it remains a field relatively unknown to the general public. This year UNESCO has joined forces with the International Union of Crystallography to promote education and public awareness, and we are delighted to contribute to this effort with the Dorothy Hodgkin Symposium.

Dorothy Hodgkin was a British biochemist, credited with the development of protein crystallography. She studied at Somerville as an undergraduate and spent her career there, as a Tutorial Fellow and then University Professor. She is best known for advancing the technique of x-ray crystallography in the study of biomolecules, and is regarded as one of the pioneer scientists in the field. Her work was honored with many distinctions during her career, including the Fellowship of the Royal Society (RS) in 1946, the RS Royal Medal in 1956, the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964 and the Order of Merit in 1965. She remains the only British woman to have won a Nobel Prize for science.

The Dorothy Hodgkin Symposium is a one day event that aims to recognise Dorothy Hodgkin’s legacy and mark the award of her Nobel Prize. Her field, crystallography, underpins all of the sciences today and has an extensive range of applications within the agro-food, aeronautic, computer, electro-mechanical, pharmaceutical and mining industries and more. 45 scientists have been awarded the Nobel Prize over the past century for work that is either directly or indirectly related to crystallography, and yet it remains a field relatively unknown to the general public. This year UNESCO has joined forces with the International Union of Crystallography to promote education and public awareness, and we are delighted to contribute to this effort with the Dorothy Hodgkin Symposium.