Canada 2016 report

Technical Information
Name of Party: 
Canada
Date of ratification: 
5/11/2005
Organization(s) or entity(es) responsible for the preparation of the report: 
Department of Canadian Heritage
Officially designated Point of Contact: 
Title: 
Ms
First Name: 
Nathalie
Family Name: 
Théberge
Organization: 
Copyright and International Trade Policy Branch, Department of Canadian Heritage
Mailing Address: 
8-237, 25 Eddy Street, Gatineau, QC K1A 0M5
Telephone: 
819-934-0971
Fax: 
819-953-6720
E-mail: 
Nathalie.Theberge@canada.ca
Name of stakeholders, including civil society organizations, involved in the preparation of the report: 
Name: 
Charles Vallerand
Position: 
Director General
Organization: 
Coalition for Cultural Diversity (CCD)
Describe the multi-stakeholder consultation process established for the preparation of this report: 

This report was prepared in consultation with Canada’s provincial and territorial governments as well as with a grouping of civil society organizations.Consultation with the provinces and territories took place around the federal/provincial/territorial table on culture and heritage, which brings together representatives from ministers responsible for culture at all levels of government in the country. In particular, an electronically distributed form was used to collect best practices for each of the themes covered by the operational guidelines.Close cooperation was established between the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Ministère de la Culture, des Communications du Québec in the spirit of the Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec concerning UNESCO. Ratified in 2006, this agreement allows the Government of Quebec to be represented, when it so wishes, as a full member of all Canadian Delegations to UNESCO proceedings, meetings, and conferences. Annex 2 of this report responds to this cooperation and emphasizes the experience of Quebec, a partner and promoter of the Convention from the very outset of the implementation of the Convention.Civil society was consulted through the Coalition for Cultural Diversity, a Canadian association that brings together the main unions and professional associations in the country’s cultural sector on issues related to the Convention. In all, the 33 members of the Coalition represent over 180,000 creators, and 2,200 companies and non-profit agencies in all cultural fields (publishing, audiovisual and new media, music, performing arts and visual arts) in all regions of the country. In particular, the Coalition prepared the text in the section highlighting the activities led by civil society. More information on the Coalition and its activities can be found at: http://www.cdc-ccd.org/

Executive Summary
Please summarize in max 3500 characters the main achievements and challenges in implementing the Convention and the outlook for the future. Please note this is not an introduction to the report or an annotated table of contents.: 
In the four years since its last quadrennial report was published, Canada has updated many of its programs and policy action in response to fundamental shifts in the cultural sector, notably rapid technological advances and changes in how Canadians produce and consume cultural expressions and content. The Government of Canada continues to take an active role in fostering a diversified cultural ecosystem through a broad array of tools to help nurture the development of cultural content and expressions, and to ensure their distribution.Canada’s cultural toolkit is vast, spanning from policies, funding programs, and tax credits to regulations and legislation. The Government of Canada and the governments of its provinces and territories have adopted various measures to ensure sound planning and accountability in the artistic and cultural fields. Each level of government is also equipped with a variety of institutions such as funding agencies, arts councils, and public broadcasters. Domestic measures at all levels of government aim to provide continued and sustainable support to the arts and culture sector.Furthermore, governments are working hand-in-hand with public and private partners to encourage and enable the creation of artistic and cultural content that reflects Canada’s diversity, and to facilitate access to that content by domestic and international audiences. Through innovative public-private partnerships such as the Canada Media Fund and Factor/Musicaction, which help to develop and finance the production of audiovisual content and sound recordings by Canadian creators, Canada aims to maintain a sustainable and competitive environment for its cultural industries.The Government of Canada has also taken action to promote the diversity of cultural expressions internationally. These measures include ensuring mobility for professionals in the cultural field, signing audiovisual treaties for coproductions, and supporting capacity-building, information sharing, training and technical assistance through projects tailored to the specific needs of beneficiary countries. Canada actively promotes the objectives of the Convention when negotiating international trade agreements, a longstanding practice which has been replicated by other major trade partners.  Several cultural institutions also implement measures to promote international cultural cooperation by establishing funding programs to increase capacity for inviting foreign artists and encouraging partnerships with artistic and cultural companies abroad. Examples of innovative practices are found throughout Canada’s second report.Through these efforts, Canada shows its engagement in the implementation of the Convention at the national and international levels.In terms of outlook for the future, Canada will continue to reflect on the impact of digital technologies on the diversity of cultural expressions. Canada firmly believes that the Convention remains as relevant and useful as ever in a digital environment, an idea which is expanded upon throughout this report. While important challenges lie ahead as the world is filled with an abundance of cultural content in various formats, Parties to the Convention can now share the innovative tools that they have developed to fulfill the objectives of this Convention, and learn from each other’s best practices.
Overview of cultural policy context
Parties shall describe the key objectives and priorities of their current cultural policy and the impact the Convention has had in their formulation or reformulation. They will also report on the opportunities and challenges to promote the diversity of cultural expressions in a digital environment.: 

Canada possesses a vast ecosystem of cultural policies and measures which promote the diversity of cultural expressions on its territory. Implemented at various levels of government, these measures complement one another to support all stages of cultural expression: creation, production, distribution, dissemination and participation. This report highlights a sample of well-established measures with compelling results, as well as innovative measures which were set up more recently to respond to changing needs.Several federal agencies implement cultural policies and measures. The Department of Canadian Heritage (PCH) is responsible for areas of intervention (program activities), which comprise a range of complementary measures. First, the area “cultural industries” support the Canadian cultural sector to ensure that a range of Canadian cultural content is produced and is accessible to Canadian and international audiences. This also allows Canadian creators and entreprenors to produce, market and export canadian cultural content. Second, the “arts” program direction aims to improve Canadians’ access to artistic, cultural and heritage activities in diverse communities and to contribute to the sustainability of the arts sector.More information on PCH and its Portfolio organizations can be found here: https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage.htmlThe continued emergence of digital technologies provides the opportunity for more diverse cultural expressions and highlights the challenges faced by governments and public institutions in helping local cultural expressions stand out in the abundance of digital content available worldwide.Changes in content consumption and engagement are transforming the creative industries, requiring industry players to adjust existing business models or develop new ones. While all creative industries have been affected by technological developments, each is at a different stage of digital evolution.Policy makers are in the midst of updating policy approaches to reflect today’s reality so that Canadian artistic cultural content can thrive in a global and digital environment and be distributed around the world. As Canada publishes its second quadrennial report, the Minister of Canadian Heritage has launched public consultations to better understand the challenges and opportunities for the cultural and creative industries brought on by these transformations. These consultations are a learning opportunity for Canadians to examine our current federal government tool box in cultural policy.

Has the Convention been integrated into the policy development process in any of the following ways?: 
a) It is (or has been) the basis for changing one or more policies?: 
Yes
How: 
It is not always easy to demonstrate the impact of the Convention on the formulation of domestic cultural policies and programs, as many of them pre-date its entry into force.That being said, and while the Convention may not have been the basis for Canada to change a specific policy over the course of the last four years, the section below will provide examples of how the Convention was and remains a reference for ongoing policy development, and an essential tool to promote policy discussions.
b) It is (or has been) a tool to promote policy discussion?: 
Yes
How: 

Since its ratification, the Convention has acted as a catalyzer which allowed fruitful policy discussion and exchanges between the governments of Canada and Quebec in particular, both of whom play very active roles in the promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions in the country and abroad. Both work in close cooperation on all aspects of the implementation of the Convention, in the spirit of the Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec concerning UNESCO. Signed in 2006, the agreement gives the Government of Quebec the right to be represented, when it so wishes, as a full member of all Canadian Delegations for UNESCO proceedings, meetings, and conferences.The Convention has also been instrumental in establishing a sound collaboration with civil society organizations as it relates to cultural policy discussions, notably through the Canadian Commission for UNESCO (CCU). While this report intends to highlight activities undertaken between 2010 and 2014, it may be interesting to note that a panel discussion was organized by the CCU and the Department of Canadian Heritage in 2015 to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Convention. This event offered a unique opportunity to reflect on how digital technologies have modified the way in which culture is created and shared, and how they have enhanced, and sometimes challenged, the diversity of cultural expressions. The discussion was attended by approximately 100 participants and featured distinctive panelists, who offered insights and alternative approaches to ensuring the vitality of diverse cultural expressions in the online environment.

c) It is (or has been) a reference for ongoing policy development?: 
Yes
How: 

Recent actions taken by Canada in the area of culture as it relates to international trade have been directly inspired by the text of the Convention, particularly article 21, which calls for the promotion of its objectives and principles in other international fora. Between 2010 and 2014, eight free trade agreements were concluded or entered into force, and they all feature exceptions for the cultural industries as well as references to the Convention’s objectives in their preambles.For example, an explicit reference to the Convention was added to the preamble of the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement that Canada concluded with the European Union in 2014. In the agreement, both Parties affirm their commitments to the Convention and recognize that states have the right to preserve, develop and implement their cultural policies, and to support their cultural industries. The preamble also recognizes that “the provisions of this Agreement preserve the right of the Parties to regulate within their territories and the Parties' flexibility to achieve legitimate policy objectives, such as public health, safety, environment, public morals and the promotion and protection of cultural diversity.”Similarly, the trade agreement between Canada and Korea, which was concluded in 2014, preserves the flexibility for both parties to pursue domestic cultural policy objectives. It also refers to the importance of promoting cultural diversity in the Preamble, and includes a specific provision on cultural cooperation.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Eye on Canada

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

In June of 2013 at the Banff World Media Festival, the Eye on Canada brand was launched as part of a national strategy to promote Canadian content. It was developed by Telefilm, the Canada Media Fund, and the Canadian Media Production Association to unite all initiatives surrounding the promotion of Canadian audiovisual content and to resonate with various audiences at home and internationally. The brand is a conversation-starter for use by all Canadians to celebrate and promote the diversity and quality of Canadian audiovisual content, including feature films, television and digital media.The site www.eyeoncanada.ca is a user-friendly online property that celebrates the uniqueness and diversity of Canada’s thriving audiovisual industry. Users of the site, which is updated regularly, will find new original content like interviews with cast members, producers and those involved in the creative process. 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Eye on Canada branding initiative resulted in the creation of a bilingual website: http://www.eyeoncanada.ca/  and a growing discussion on social media with the hashtag #eyeoncanada.On the website, contemporary Canadian screen-based content is curated for Canadian and international audiences, and allows viewers to browse or search for works. Designed with consumers of Canadian feature film, television and digital media, such as videogames, in mind, the website features profile pages on Canadian productions – past and present – featuring trailers, official pictures and production details, including information on lead cast members. The website also provides access to dynamic social media content so that users can follow and join the conversation on their favourite productions or discover new ones. It invites users to share and engage in conversations through the use of the hashtag #eyeoncanada, which unifies online discussion about Canadian screen-based content. Introduced in 2013, this hashtag is used as a reference by a growing number of supporters of Canadian content.Users are able to access curated editorial content from well-known Canadian bloggers and vloggers regarding the latest news from the Canadian screen-based entertainment industry. A newsletter also allows subscribers to be the first to know about updates to Eye on Canada.To help to make eyeoncanada.ca a destination for Canadian content, producers are invited to submit their film, television, and digital media productions to the Eye on Canada collection through an online form found on the website, making it easier for audiences to discover their work.For more information, please see: https://www.telefilm.ca/en/news/releases/2015/03/03/eyeoncanadaca-celebrates-canadian-television-feature-film-and-digital-media 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

It is expected that the Eye on Canada brand will help promote Canadian screen-based content both in Canada and internationally. The website www.eyeoncanada.ca is expected to broaden audiences, helping Canadian producers gain exposure. Finally, the #eyeoncanada hashtag being used throughout social media will help to promote the national discussion about film, television and digital media. 

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
Yes
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Media Fund (CMF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The mission of the Canada Media Fund (CMF) is to foster, promote, develop and finance the production of Canadian content and relevant applications for all audiovisual media platforms. The CMF funds the sustainable production of screen-based Canadian content across multiple platforms such as television, wireless devices or the internet. Its goal is to guide Canadian content towards a competitive global environment through fostering industry innovation, rewarding success, enabling a diversity of voices and promoting access to content through industry and private sector partnerships. Created by Canada’s cable, satellite, and IPTV distributors and the Government of Canada, the CMF aspires to connect Canadians to their creative expressions, to each other, and to the world. From its launch in 2010-11 to 2013-14, the CMF leveraged $3.40 of activity for every dollar invested, for a total of $4.8 billion in industry activity.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Launched in 2010, the Canada Media Fund (CMF) is an arm’s-length public-private partnership, funded by the Government of Canada and Canadian cable, satellite, and IPTV distributors. The CMF is an independent corporation: while the Government sets out the policy parameters for the CMF, the Fund has its own Board of Directors, and the guidelines and administration of the funding program are its own responsibility. This governance model allows content review and creation to be separate from political involvement. The CMF regularly consults industry stakeholders in a regular, formal, inclusive and meaningful way.The CMF promotes, develops and finances the production of Canadian content and applications for all audiovisual media platforms. The CMF delivers financial support to the Canadian television and digital media industries through two streams of funding. The Convergent Stream supports the creation of innovative, convergent television and digital media content for consumption by Canadians. The Experimental Stream encourages the creation of leading-edge, interactive digital media content and software applications. In 2014-15, the CMF contributed $365.6 million to Canadian television and digital media projects, triggering $1.3 billion in production activity. Through the Convergent Stream, 505 productions received $311.3 million in funding, which generated 2,800 hours of new content. Through the Experimental Stream, 108 innovative projects were selected and received $38.6 million in funding. The CMF also provides funding to television and digital media coproductions between Canadian and international producers (see measure entitled “Canada Media Fund’s funding for international coproductions and the Framework for International Digital Media Coproduction”).

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) is expected to continue to support the sustainable production of Canadian screen-based media across multiple platforms. It is expected to help Canadian content remain competitive in the global digital environment.The vision of the CMF is that “Canadians and world audiences have access to and demand innovative, successful Canadian television and digital content on all platforms.”For more information on the vision and mission of the CMF, please see its annual report: http://ar-ra14-15.cmf-fmc.ca/

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) receives financial contributions from the Government of Canada and Canada’s cable, satellite and IPTV distributors. Through CRTC regulations, broadcast distributors are required to make an annual contribution of 5% of their annual broadcasting revenues to Canadian programming, most of which goes to the CMF. The Government has provided $134.1 million per year in ongoing stable funding to the CMF since 2010-11.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

After the evaluation of its activities from 2010 to 2014, the Evaluation Services of the Department of Canadian Heritage concluded, among other things, that the Canada Media Fund (CMF):1. Is responsive to the needs of CanadiansThe CMF is the most important source of financing for Canadian digital content in the drama, documentary, children/youth, variety and performing arts genres. It addresses the issues associated with the small size of the official language markets, including the financial disincentives associated with creating original programming as compared to acquiring less expensive foreign content. The evaluation observed that the Government’s objectives in connection with official language minority communities in Canada are reinforced by the CMF through its support for productions in Aboriginal and official language minority communities.2. Aligns with the priorities of the Government of CanadaThe CMF’s mandate and objectives supports the federal government’s priority and the Department’s strategic outcome that "Canadian artistic expressions are created and accessible at home and abroad.” It is also consistent with the departmental priority of “taking full advantage of digital technology” and reinforces the Government’s digital agenda.3. Aligns to Federal roles and responsibilitiesThe CMF is well aligned with the Government’s roles and responsibilities as it is an instrument to support Canadian broadcasting policy. The CMF supports the Department and its responsibility to ensure that the broadcasting and digital communications sectors contribute to the objectives set out in the Broadcasting Act.The full evaluation can be found here: http://www.cmf-fmc.ca/documents/files/news/2015/dch-cmf-evaluation-summary.pdf 

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The evaluation was conducted in accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat evaluation policy framework and in accordance with the Federal Accountability Act and the Financial Administration Act. It addressed the core issues of relevance and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy. The evaluation process included the following activities: a literature review to conduct a scan of the broadcasting and digital media environments and comparative analysis with other similar programs; a document review; key informant interviews with stakeholder groups; case studies; a value-for-money analysis; an expert panel; and a “Looking Forward” analysis was conducted to contextualize the current evaluation within the rapidly evolving broadcasting and digital media industry. The evaluation covered the activities and expected outcomes of the program, including the Canada Media Fund (CMF) Corporation. Excluded from the scope of the evaluation were areas of activity which have an impact on the CMF, but on which the Department has no authority or limited influence, such as the performance of the CMF Board members.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Launched in 2013, the Ontario Music Fund (OMF) was the first comprehensive business development program to support all segments of the Ontario music industry, including live presenters. The key objective of the OMF is to strengthen and stimulate growth in Ontario’s music companies and support the province’s growing music sector. The Fund is designed to drive activity and investment and to support Ontario’s music companies and organizations in expanding their economic and cultural footprints within Canada and around the world. The OMF replaced the former Music Fund and Export Fund of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.The goals of the OMF are to:

  • Increase music production activity in Ontario;
  • Strengthen and develop the support structures and systems that contribute to economic and cultural growth;
  • Increase opportunities for new/emerging Canadian artists;
  • Create opportunities for emerging artists/small music companies; and
  • Support Ontario’s musical diversity, particularly with respect to music from culturally diverse, Aboriginal and Franco-Ontarian communities.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF) aims to address investment gaps at key phases of company and industry development cycles. It provides matching financial support through four program streams to music companies (record labels, music publishers, music managers, artist entrepreneurs, music promoters, music presenters, and booking agents), and to music industry trade, service, event and training organizations. The Fund is structured to address the entire value chain of the music sector and to complement other support programs. Extensive consultations and partnerships with industry trade organizations were carried out in developing the program.The four streams are: Music Industry Development, Music Company Development, Live Music, and Music Futures.- The Music Industry Development stream is designed to strengthen and develop the support structures and systems that contribute to economic and cultural growth of the music industry in Ontario by supporting organizations engaging in strategic initiatives with long-term impacts on the growth and sustainability of Ontario’s music industry.- The Music Company Development stream is intended to provide Ontario-based music companies with funding to support new or expanded business activities, including strategic business and market development, in the form of investments and undertakings.- The Live Music stream is intended to increase the number and quality of live music experiences enjoyed by residents of and visitors to Ontario at events, festivals and concerts featuring Canadian artists.- The Music Futures stream specifically creates opportunities for emerging artists and music businesses in Francophone, Aboriginal, and ethnocultural communities, as well as in under-represented musical genres.For more information, please see:  http://www.omdc.on.ca/music/the_ontario_music_fund.htm

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Ontario Music Fund (OMF) is intended to help the Ontario music industry grow and expand in Canada and across the world. Expected results include an increase in music production activity, company revenues, and market share in Ontario, stronger support structures, increased opportunities for new and emerging Canadian artists and small music companies, as well as greater support of Aboriginal, ethnocultural, and Franco-Ontarian music communities. An increase in tourism attributed to live music performances is also expected.The OMF is also advancing the Ontario government’s Live Music Strategy by providing support for live performances and touring opportunities, helping to grow audiences – both in Ontario and abroad – for Canadian music developed in Ontario.

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Announced in the 2013 Ontario Budget as a three-year, $45 million grant program, the Ontario Music Fund (OMF) was made permanent in the 2015 Ontario Budget at $15 million annually. For the year 2014, transfer payments made by the OMF were detailed at $14,004,000 CAD.To date, the OMF has provided approximately $42.2 million to Ontario’s music industry.Source: http://www.omdc.on.ca/Assets/Communications/Annual+Report/Annual+Report+2013-14_en.pdf 

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Since the program was launched in 2013, three evaluation processes have been undertaken to review aspects of its operation:

  1. The program was reviewed from an operational point of view by the delivery agency, the Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC), as part of its regular cycle of program reviews. A third-party consultant was engaged to carry out review activities, which involved a limited level of stakeholder consultations.
  2. In 2016, the program was reviewed for compliance with internal Ontario government accountability directives by an internal audit team. This review focused on administrative effectiveness and compliances with rules for transfer payments.
  3. The ministry and the OMDC evaluated program rules and guidelines in 2015-16 as part of efforts to enhance effectiveness and return on investment, following the government’s decision in 2015 to extend the program beyond its initial three-year run. Stakeholders and industry trade associations were consulted as part of this process.

The program was found to be meeting its goals of stimulating expanded recording and performing activity in Ontario, but opportunities were found to sharpen results reporting and tracking of the return on investment.The first and third evaluations included direct stakeholders and participants in the program (music companies and organizations through the province).

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The evaluations, in part, examined indicators such as:

  • The increase in the number of recordings released by Ontario companies (including both Canadian and foreign artists)
  • The increase in the number of live music performance opportunities presented, and total attendance (audience) for the events
  • The increase in overall revenues for participating companies, and, by proxy, market share
  • The increase in the business capacity of the participating independent companies, measured by full time employees, cash flow and probability
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Nova Scotia Status of the Artist Act

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

In 2012, the Government of Nova Scotia passed the Status of the Artist Act as a part of the implementation of the 2011 Arts and Culture 5-Point Plan. While not an official culture strategy, the 5-Point Plan set out the government’s priorities for supporting the development of the arts and culture sector for the following several years, which included developing and introducing Status of the Artist legislation.The Act helps to define the role of artists and investment in supporting and fostering artistic activity in Nova Scotia. The legislation allows artists to set pay for work and services, outlines the government's roles and responsibilities toward artists, and helps ensure that Nova Scotians have access to artistic training and education. Another objective is to promote fair treatment for artists and enhance their contributions to making life better for families through Nova Scotia's creative economy.For more information about the Act, please see: http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20120330002For more information about the 5-Point Plan, please see: http://cch.novascotia.ca/sites/default/files/inline/documents/fivepointplan.pdf 

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
legislative
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The province developed the legislation with input from the Creative Nova Scotia Leadership Council, which advises government on arts and culture policy, based on legislation and best practices in other jurisdictions. The Council is made up of representatives from the arts and culture sector.The legislation:

  • Allows artists' associations to set levels of pay for works created and services rendered;
  • Encourages fair treatment of artists by government and outline government's roles and responsibilities to artists;
  • Continues to ensure all Nova Scotians have access to artistic training and education;
  • Acknowledges the working conditions of artists;
  • Affirms government's commitment to the rights of artists, for example, safe working conditions and freedom of expression and association; and
  • Ensures government has the necessary tools to support Nova Scotia's artists and their unique needs.

For more information, please see: http://nslegislature.ca/legc/bills/61st_4th/1st_read/b001.htm 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

As stated under the Act (article 2 – Purpose), the results expected through its implementation are the following: - the role of the artist in building the Province's identity and culture and the enhancement that art brings to the Province's social and economic well-being will be acknowledged;- the terms by which Nova Scotians define who is a professional artist will be identified;- the unique working conditions of the Province's professional artists will be acknowledged, as well as their right to:

  • freedom of expression and association;
  • have associations representing artists to be recognized in law and to promote their professional and socio-economic interests; and
  • have access to advisory forums in which artists may express their views on their status and any other questions concerning them.

Two areas in which the Status of the Artist legislation has had direct impact on the working conditions of professional artists in Nova Scotia are the positive consequences emerging from a clear definition of “Professional Artist” and the acknowledgement of their associated rights.The Status of the Artist Act defines a “Professional Artist” and Arts Nova Scotia is able to use this legal definition in the eligibility criteria for its funding programs. The definition also has an impact beyond funding eligibility and extends into the area of labour standards.Professional artists are considered to be “self-employed.” While this designation provides some benefits such as autonomy and freedom in the exercise of their work and allows them to claim work related expenses for taxation purposes, artists had no historical right to self-organize and bargain collectively. Many artistic disciplines organized themselves into associations, but until federal Status of the Artist legislation emerged, the impact of such self-organization across Canada was limited.  Nova Scotia’s Status of the Artist legislation allows for self-organization and collective bargaining in areas that are under provincial jurisdiction.

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

No direct financial resources were associated with the implementation of the Status of the Artist Act itself. However, this new act defining “Professional Artist” was designed and established concurrently with legislation that created Arts Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia’s agency responsible for delivering approximately $3.4 million in support of the province’s professional artists and arts organizations.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Creative Saskatchewan

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan was established as a crown agency of the Government of Saskatchewan in July of 2013. The agency was created in recognition of the integral role that creative industries play in a vibrant Saskatchewan. Creative Saskatchewan stimulates the commercialization of creative products and helps Saskatchewan’s creative talent find firmer footing in domestic and international markets. The agency accomplishes this through a suite of grants, mentoring opportunities, marketing activities, and strong partnerships with creative industry associations. Since its establishment, the agency has been operating a variety of grants to support creative industry production, marketing and export. These grants have already made a major impact on Saskatchewan’s creative industries through investment and partnership building with creative industry associations. These partnerships strengthen the creative sector development plan and the agency’s aim to positively affect the gross domestic product (GDP) of the Province of Saskatchewan. Recent data from the Statistics Canada Culture Satellite Account shows that in 2014 Saskatchewan’s cultural GDP grew 3.3%, following a gain of 1.1% in 2013.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Regional
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan is a provincial crown agency which works with the creative industries of the province. It is responsible for six sectors: music, screen based media, visual arts and fine craft, book publishing, live performing arts, and digital media. Below is a summary of Creative Saskatchewan’s nine funding programs and their intended impact on Saskatchewan’s cultural talent.

  1. Business Capacity – development of professional capacity and skills;
  2. Research - industry-based projects and market intelligence;
  3. Creative Industries Production - production and product refinement;
  4. Market and Export Development - for individuals/businesses and sector organizations;
  5. Market Travel - financial support toward awards, showcases, presentations, etc.;
  6. Sound Recording - production of commercially-viable music products;
  7. Screen-based Media Content Development - early phase projects;
  8. Screen-based Media Production - requiring a 30 per cent Saskatchewan spend; and
  9. Performing Arts Tour Support - must demonstrate commercial viability and have already lined up at least six performance dates.

Creative Saskatchewan is accountable for ensuring that program funds and association supports are dispersed equitably and effectively. To that end, grant applications for most programs are vetted through a peer review jury system. Juries are comprised of respected individuals from industry sectors suggested by the creative industry associations.For more information, please see: http://www.creativesask.ca/ 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Creative Saskatchewan is driven to achieve a future where Saskatchewan's creative producers continue to realize diverse commercial opportunities in national, international and emerging markets which collectively grow thriving, sustainable creative industries. Examples of projects funded include:CraftAdam Finn received $18,810 through the Creative Industries Production Grant to produce handcrafted leather footwear with the goal of expanding his business, Last Shoes, into larger markets.Heather Abbey received $13,013 from the Market and Export Development Grant (MEDG) to assist with marketing expenses for the ShopIndig.ca Cart, which features products created by Saskatchewan-based artisans.Digital/InteractiveOneStory Inc. received $2,833 through the Market Travel Grant and Culture on the Go program to attend the Sustainable Brand Activation Hub Market Place in San Diego.Saskatchewan Interactive Media Association (SIMA) received $20,000 through the MEDG to develop and implement an innovative website designed to market, showcase and encourage business growth for Saskatchewan’s interactive digital media industry.MusicClose Talker received $5,000 through the Market Travel and Culture on the Go program to showcase at The Great Escape festival in Brighton, England.Jess Moskaluke received $80,500 through the MEDG to assist with expenses related to promotion and advertising, working with a publicist, filming a music video, website and social media strategy development/implementation, and a radio tour.PublishingCoteau Books received $30,700 through the Creative Industries Production Grant to assist with publishing seven new titles.University of Regina Press received $30,953 through the Market and Export Development Fund to increase market and export presence, particularly in the U.S.A., through marketing activities, publicity and print advertising.Screen-Based MediaTwo Television series received funding through the Screen-Based Media Production Grant Program: Nordic Lodge (Season 2) received $168,500, and The Prairie Diner (Season 3) received $43,216.

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Creative Saskatchewan receives $7.7 million (CAD) in funding annually from the Government of Saskatchewan. Of this amount, $5 million is distributed directly through grant programs and $1.5 million is targeted to support operations for six creative industry associations: SaskBooks, SaskGalleries, SaskMusic, Saskatchewan Craft Council, Saskatchewan Interactive Media Association and the Saskatchewan Media Production Industry Association. The remaining budgeted funds are targeted to marketing, trade missions, market export initiatives, professional development and administration.The detailed financial statements of Creative Saskatchewan can be found online at the following link: http://www.creativesask.ca/ 

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
Regional
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Stakeholder consultations on the success of Creative Saskatchewan in achieving its mission and client services were conducted in 2015. The consultations led to the implementation by Creative Saskatchewan of several recommendations, including a new communications plan, a new website and an online application system, a review of program policies and procedures, an examination of funding equity, and a review of board governance.For more information on the consultation report, please see: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/public-consultations/creative-saskatchewan-review

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Indicators used to assess successes of the Crown Agency included: alignment with Saskatchewan’s cultural policy and with sister agencies that support arts (Saskatchewan Arts Board) and culture (SaskCulture); alignment with government direction; compliance with agency legislation; progress toward agency goals; and achievements in sector development, communications and client services.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Quebec: Quebec's Digital Cultural Plan

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

Digital technology has reconstructed artistic disciplines, opened markets and fragmented audiences, multiplied methods of production and dissemination, changed consumer habits and shaken up traditional business models. Aware of this evolving reality, the MCC began a vast consultation process in 2010 to determine the first steps to take in the digital transformation of culture in Quebec.In the quadrennial periodic report on measures to protect and promote cultural diversity submitted in 2012, Quebec announced that digital cultural content would be a priority focus for the coming years and that a strategy would be developed for digital cultural content development and access.The work begun by the MCC therefore led to the development of Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan in collaboration with the network of state-owned enterprises and organizations, as well as stakeholders in the cultural and communications field. The Plan was unveiled in 2014 and spans seven years. It helps ensure the vitality of Quebec culture and make its influence felt in local, national and international markets. It provides a basis for helping cultural environments to make a smooth transition to digital technologies so that Quebec can continue to count on that significant support for its economy and remain competitive in world markets.Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan is based on three key strategies:

  • creating digital cultural content;
  • innovating to adapt to digital culture;
  • disseminating digital cultural content to ensure its accessibility.

The purpose of the plan is to:

  • provide cultural stakeholders with the means to create and innovate in a rapidly growing technological environment;
  • disseminate “Our culture, here, everywhere” with preference given to disseminating Quebec culture to the largest number of people in local, national and international markets.
c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
Local
Regional
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
institutional
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan (available online in French only) proposes over 50 measures for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. Digital technology is changing quickly, and measures for later years will be specified at a later time.The measures are grouped by main cultural sectors. The following are examples of measures by sector:

  • Drama and performing arts: help acquire digital equipment for multidisciplinary and specialized publicists.
  • Arts and literature: support artists, writers, artists’ or writers’ collectives and artistic organizations in their efforts to integrate new creation tools by funding the creation and development of original, digital cultural content.
  • Film: help regional theatre operators to disseminate cultural works using current digital technologies to provide regional public access to Quebec cultural works that are unavailable in the region.
  • Reading and books: support an update of Quebec’s public libraries’ digital collections to reach a wider readership.
  • Media: organize a one-day conference on the impacts and perspectives of changes in the media.
  • Museology: create a digital platform (EducArt) to disseminate thematic content based on the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ collections that is adapted to needs of various audiences.
  • Music: increase support for music industry businesses in adjusting to digital technologies and enriching content.
  • Heritage: develop a collaborative platform to analyze and disseminate Quebec’s archeological reference collections.
  • All sectors: coordinate and host a space to exchange ideas on the rise of digital technologies in culture (Lab culturel, available in French only).

 

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

Through Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan, the MCC is supporting cultural communities by taking account of the importance of the changes underway stemming from digital technologies and ensuring that Quebec’s cultural works and products are available on digital platforms, which now knows no bounds. The Plan therefore encourages the dissemination of Quebec culture to a wide audience in local, national and international markets.The MCC must ensure that future investments reflect needs as much as possible. As a result, the MCC is part of an ongoing conversation with cultural and digital communities and paying attention to the problems and observations noted through the various consultation processes or events related to digital technologies.In order to face the various challenges presented by digital technologies, Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan must expand the scope of its actions to reach as many stakeholders as possible in cultural, academic and other sectors for more of the cultural network to adopt digital technologies across the board.The cultural networks, artists and public’s digital skills also need to be improved.

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

A total of $CAD 110M has been budgeted over seven years to implement Quebec’s Digital Cultural Plan. A total of $CAD 36M has been invested for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 to implement 51 measures in the following sectors:                                                                            $CAD M

  • Drama and performing arts

1.1

  • Arts and literature

6.3

  • Film

2.45

  • Reading and books

2.525

  • Media

2.05

  • Fine craft

0.2

  • Museology

10.9

  • Music

3.0

  • Heritage

5.125

  • All sectors

2.35   TOTAL    36.0 An addition $CAD 10.23M was announced in 2013-2014 to fund five digital infrastructure initiatives in Quebec’s various regions.

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The CRTC’s review of its television policies to facilitate the transition to an increasingly on-demand environment

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The television system is undergoing a fundamental shift brought on by broadband Internet and wireless networks. Increasingly, Canadians seek greater control over the programs they watch and access content on an even wider array of devices, sometimes bypassing the traditional curators of content, such as broadcasters and distributors.In response to this changing environment, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) launched Let's Talk TV: A conversation with Canadians in 2013, a consultation about the future of the television system and how it can adapt to evolving technologies and new consumption habits. The two-year process, involving three phases and innovative engagement methods, produced a record 13,000 interventions from Canadians, industry, and interested stakeholders. Subsequent decisions and three new policies were released in early 2015 to ensure that Canadians are at the center of a diverse, affordable, responsive and forward-looking television system.The detailed implications of these new policies are starting to be known but have yet to fully unfold at this stage. This will be a topic of interest for Canada’s next periodic report.Based on the assumption that Canadians will continue to migrate from scheduled television and packaged programming services to an on-demand and tailored television environment, the CRTC has adopted measures designed to facilitate that transition. These measures are meant to provide incentives for all players in the broadcasting system to find new and innovative approaches to support the creation of compelling and diverse programming.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The measures are based on four themes:A. Making Canadian programming widely available and visibleTo increase country-wide access to Canadian programming on Canadian-operated online platforms, the CRTC created a new hybrid video-on-demand (VOD) service category, which is exempted from the requirement to hold a broadcasting license. This will remove barriers for Canadian companies and allow them to compete in an on-demand environment.In order to ensure that the contents of programming packages align with the needs and interests of Canadians, an industry working group is developing new tools, such as an audience measurement system.The CRTC hosted a summit on the discoverability of Canadian television programs in early 2016.B. An emphasis on quality rather than quantityTo support the production of high-quality programming, the CRTC is shifting from a regulatory approach based on exhibition quotas (the number of hours of Canadian programming broadcast) to one based on expenditures (the amount of money spent on Canadian programming).C. Regulatory support for specific types of programming which are of interest, but only where market failure is demonstratedThe CRTC is eliminating the genre exclusivity policy, which limited programming services to offering only certain types of programming and precluded others from offering the same. In doing so, the CRTC allows new services to enter the marketplace, programming flexibility, and greater domestic competition. This ensures that programming diversity is governed by market forces to the greatest extent possible, as services will be able to respond to consumers and adopt creative strategies.However, the CRTC maintained support mechanisms for the types of programs considered to be of national interest (documentaries and dramas), and strengthened its criteria for national news services.D. A simplified and streamlined licensing processThe CRTC is instituting measures to reduce regulatory burden by exempting a greater number of programming services from the requirement to hold a broadcasting license.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

A concerted effort by all players in the broadcasting system, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), is currently under way to find new and innovative approaches to support the creation of compelling and diverse Canadian programming. The measures outlined by the CRTC to address the ongoing television system’s transition to an increasingly on-demand environment are designed to focus on the creation and distribution of quality Canadian content which will appeal to a worldwide audience. Increased flexibility will enable broadcasters to adapt to the shifting digital environment and to improve the promotion and discoverability of Canadian programming in an on-demand digital world.

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

N/A

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
No
❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Book Fund (CBF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Book Fund (CBF) ensures access to a diverse range of Canadian-authored books nationally and internationally, by fostering a strong book industry that publishes and markets Canadian-authored books. The Government of Canada provides support for the Canadian book industry through two main streams of the CBF: Support for Publishers and Support for Organizations, the former with two components: Publishing Support and Business Development.The Publishing Support component strengthens the Canadian book industry by providing financial assistance to publishers for the ongoing production, marketing and distribution of Canadian-authored books. Supplementary funding based on export sales is also available as part of Publishing Support. The Business Development component strengthens the Canadian book industry by providing financial assistance to publishers for the following projects: publishing internships, technology internships and business planning.Support for Organizations helps organizations and associations in the Canadian book industry with two key objectives in mind: the marketing and promotion of Canadian-authored books, and strengthening the infrastructure and capacity of the industry.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The bulk of Canada Book Fund (CBF) support is delivered through the Support for Publishers stream, which provides funding distributed primarily through a formula that rewards success in delivering content that Canadians value. This funding contributes to the ongoing production and marketing of Canadian-authored books by offsetting the high costs of publishing in Canada and building the capacity and competitiveness of the sector.In 2014, the funding for the CBF was renewed permanently. The objectives of the renewal were that the program would be focused on digital innovation and international competitiveness while working within the existing budget.Changes to the program included the following:

  • Significant overhaul of the formula designed to provide greater support to smaller businesses that need it most, provide greater focus on digital sales, and simplify the overall approach.
  • Lower barriers to entry for newer, innovative businesses (requisite period of 36 months in business reduced to 12 months).
  • An obligation for publishers (with some exceptions) to publish e-books (effective 2016-17) and a stronger emphasis on rewarding their success in selling them.
  • Digital-only publishers and digital-only titles are now eligible for funding.
  • Priority is given to projects with an international focus (particularly those that focus on digital exports).
d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The expected results for the Canada Book Fund (CBF) are the following:

  • Readers everywhere have access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books produced by CBF recipients.
  • Readers everywhere consume a broad range of Canadian authored books supported by the CBF.
f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

The Canada Book Fund (CBF) has an annual budget of $39.1 million CAD, and provides annual funding through two streams:- Support for Publishers, which has a budget of $30.7 million CAD.- Support for Organizations, which has a budget of $6 million CAD.For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072 

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation of the Canada Book Fund was completed in 2014. The evaluation, which was conducted by the Evaluation Services Directorate of the Department of Canadian Heritage, in conjunction with a third-party consulting firm, is part of the normal Government of Canada program assessment process. The evaluation concluded that the program remains relevant, well-aligned with government objectives and has achieved its expected outcomes. The evaluation recommended that the program provide support to recipients that will encourage greater production, marketing and sales of digital books.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

The following expected outcomes were identified for the Canada Book Fund (CBF): (1) creation of a diverse range of Canadian-authored books; (2) accessibility for consumption of a diverse range of Canadian-authored books in Canada and abroad; and (3) support for the viability of Canada’s book publishing industry.For the first expected outcome, the following indicators were examined: the number of new eligible works funded by the CBF, as well as the diversity of works according to language, province of production and literary genre. With respect to the second expected outcome, the evaluation looked at Canadians’ book consumption habits, the revenues of CBF-funded publishers, the diversity of Canadian-authored titles sold by program-funded publishers, and the effectiveness of program support for promotion and marketing. As for the third outcome, the following indicators were assessed: the number and diversity of publishers in Canada’s book industry, the long-term profit margin of Canadian book publishers, and the extent of their participation in new technologies and best practices.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) co-administers two tax credit programs with the Canada Revenue Agency: The Canadian Film or Video Tax Credit Program (CPTC) for Canadian content; and The Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) for non-Canadian content.The key objectives of CAVCO are to encourage Canadian programming and to stimulate the development of an active domestic independent production sector, as well as to stimulate job growth by encouraging Canadians and foreign-based film producers to employ the services of Canadians. CAVCO provides certification for an eligible production, confirming that it meets the requirements of the two programs described above and can receive a tax credit from the Canada Revenue Agency.To be recognized as a Canadian film or video production, a live action production must be allotted a total of at least six points according to the creative points scale below.  Points will only be awarded if the person(s) who rendered the services is/are Canadian.Director - 2 points; Screenwriter - 2 points; Lead performer for whose services the highest remuneration was payable  - 1 point; Lead performer for whose services the second highest remuneration was payable - 1 point; Director of photography - 1 point; Art director - 1 point; Music composer - 1 point; Picture editor - 1 point.When a production meets the CPTC program requirements, CAVCO makes a recommendation to the Minister of Canadian Heritage to issue a Canadian film or video production certificate.  The certificate also provides an estimate of the production's qualified labour expenditures, needed for calculating the tax credit. The certificate is based on an analysis of detailed cost estimates, financing plans including amounts deemed assistance, and the Canadian content requirements of the CPTC program.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
regulatory
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO), along with the Canada Revenue Agency, administers the following refundable tax credit programs to support the film and television production industry in Canada:  1) The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC) encourages the creation of Canadian programming and the development of an active domestic independent production sector. It is available to Canadian production companies for productions qualified as Canadian content; qualified productions must meet specific criteria for key creative personnel and production costs. The CPTC is available at a rate of 25 percent of the qualified labour expenditure.2) The Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) encourages the employment of Canadians by taxable Canadian or foreign-owned corporations with a permanent establishment in Canada. The PSTC is equal to 16 percent of salary and wages paid to Canadian residents or taxable Canadian corporations for services provided to the production in Canada.The first program is cultural. It credits Canadian labour expenses on Canadian content productions that are owned and controlled by Canadians.  The second program is purely industrial. It invites the world to film their productions in Canada. Companies that service non-content productions can get a credit on the Canadian labor they employ. The PSTC builds up the Canadian production infrastructure when foreign companies come to Canada to film their productions.The Canadian tax credit model has been replicated around the world because it is seen as a stable and effective way to offer government support. Together, both programs cost the federal government some $380 million annually depending on the level of production activity. The total volume of film and television production in Canada reached an all-time high of $7.1 billion in production activity in 2014-15.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
No
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The results expected from the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) are as follows:1) Canadian content film and television productions receive certification from the Department of Canadian Heritage.2) Non-Canadian content film and television productions using Canadian production services receive accreditation from the Department of Canadian Heritage.In turn, this will contribute to Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content being created and accessible at home and abroad. Reaching Canadian audiences with more Canadian content remains the key underlying goal of the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC). Through this program, the Government of Canada can invest in this cultural vehicle and make possible the production of thousands of hours of Canadian content. As all Canadian content productions must be shown in Canada, Canadians have the opportunity to see them. This helps meet the overall departmental objective of reaching Canadian audiences.  Another key expected result is related to the economic growth generated by such foreign productions and the expertise acquired by workers and technicians employed in the film and video industry sector.

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

Actual spending in 2013-14 was $ - 409,992 CAD. This negative number represents a surplus or, as for CAVCO, revenues. CAVCO collects user fees from clients. As its planned and actual revenues were higher than its expenditures, CAVCO generated revenues in 2013-14.For more information, please see: http://www.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-verEval-audEval/STAGING/texte-text/dpr-rmr-2013-14_1415218344790_eng.pdf 

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

Tax credit programs are seen as a very stable and predictable form of government support that act to leverage other public and private contributions and against which banks are willing to lend.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Performance Indicator 1: Stability and predictability While foreign sources of production financing have decreased and Canadian television licenses are static, tax credits have provided an ongoing and stable source of funding. Stable funding allows companies to survive through lean times.Performance Indicator 2: Reaching Canadian audiencesA greater amount of Canadian content is now available. Through the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC), the government’s investment in this cultural vehicle has made possible the production of thousands of hours of Canadian content. A higher amount of Canadian content ensures that it is available for audiences that want to watch it.Performance Indicator 3: Corporate financing vehicleThe CPTC has not yet met its stated objective of having a stable form of corporate financing. Rising production costs and lower amounts of foreign financing force producers to invest the credit in the production rather than in their corporations. As well, Telefilm Canada and other investors force producers to use the credit as production financing. The CPTC will be evaluated in 2016.Performance Indicator 4: Employment Tax credits are economic engines that help to create direct and indirect employment.  For instance, the Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC) builds up the Canadian production infrastructure when foreign companies come to Canada to shoot their productions. Since 1997, this industrial model has injected $24.4 billion of new money into the Canadian economy. This new money has more than repaid the tax expenditures spent by the government on tax credit.

❭ CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES

Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF)

Context of the measure: 
CULTURAL POLICIES AND MEASURES
b. Key objectives of the measure: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) provided by the Department of Canadian Heritage aims to give Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. The CAPF recognizes that arts presenters are key partners in achieving this objective by providing financial assistance to organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series and organizations that offer support to arts presenters. The fund is available to presenters and organizations across Canada, including those in underserved communities and populations.Through the CAPF, Canadians have access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. Each year, the CAPF supports approximately 600 professional arts festivals and performing arts series, as well as other activities related to arts presentation, in more than 250 cities and communities across Canada.

c. What is: 
c.1. the scope of the measure: 
National
c.2. the nature of the measure: 
financial
c.3. the main feature of the measure: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) has two main components – Programming and Development. The CAPF Programming component has two streams: Professional Arts Festivals and Performing Arts Series Presenters, and Presenter Support Organizations.The CAPF Programming component provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as their support organizations.  In 2014-15, the program funded recipients in 250 communities across the country through 242 festivals, 262 performing arts series, 82 organizations that presented both a festival and a series, and 29 presenter support organizations.The CAPF program also has a Development component to support the emergence of arts presenters and support organizations for underserved communities and populations such as aboriginal, ethnocultural, official language minority communities, youth, remote and rural communities, and contemporary artistic disciplines and genres.Examples of recipients funded under the CAPF include the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto, Ontario, the Manitoba Theatre for Young People based in Winnipeg, the Festival international Nuits d'Afrique in Montréal, Quebec, and the Calgary International Reggae Festival (ReggaeFest) in Alberta.

d. Does it specifically target individuals and/or social groups as defined in Article 7 of the Convention?: 
Yes
e. What are the results expected through the implementation of the measure?: 

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) is expected to achieve two goals:1. To ensure Canadian not-for-profit arts organizations offer a variety of arts festivals and series through funding provided by the CAPF.2. To give Canadians, including those in underserved communities, access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities.In 2014-15, the CAPF achieved both goals by providing funding support to encourage recipients in providing program variety and interaction between artists and citizens, as well as the presentation of challenging and innovative artistic experiences in Canada. These results, which are consistent with the past two years, reflect the CAPF's goals to fund recipients to present a wide range of artistic performances reflecting Canadian cultural and regional diversity, to reach underserved communities, and to encourage Canadians to engage and participate in artistic experiences. Ultimately, the long-term results of the CAPF will allow Canadians to experience and value professional artistic experiences.

f.2 Financial resources allocated to implement the measure: 

In 2014-15, the budgetary financial resourced dedicated to the program were $34,711,933 CAD.For detailed figures, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452882573072 

h. Was this measure introduced or revised in order to: 
h.1. Implement the provisions of the Convention?: 
No
h.2. Support/nurture policy discussion inspired by the Convention?: 
No
h.3. Other reasons unrelated to the Convention?: 
Yes
i. Has the implementation of the measure been evaluated?: 
Yes
i.1 At what level the evaluation was conducted?: 
National
i.2 What were the main conclusions?: 

An evaluation focused on the period from 2007-08 to 2012-13 was conducted for three Canadian Heritage Programs included in the Arts Policy Branch: the Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF), Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF), and Canada Cultural Investment Fund (CCIF). As specified by Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada’s Directive on the Evaluation Policy (2009), the core issues addressed in this evaluation were: relevance, including continued need for the programs, alignment with government priorities, alignment with federal roles and responsibilities, and performance, including effectiveness, efficiency and economy.The main conclusions and findings are that there is a continuing need for ongoing federal government support to the arts and heritage sector through programs such as the CAPF, which helps ensure that all Canadians have access to and benefit from arts and heritage experiences. Factors such as the digital revolution, the economic downturn and changing demographics contribute to the need for federal government support to ensure that arts and culture remain accessible, relevant, and sustainable.The evaluation also found that the CAPF enabled a large number of arts presenters to reach a wide range of communities and audiences, expose communities to various professional artistic experiences, strengthen their linkages in the community, and further develop their professional skills. On average, nearly 600 projects were funded annually across a wide range of disciplines, communities and groups, including underserved populations. About 65% of communities reached with the CAPF programming component and 28% of communities reached with the development component were rural and remote.

i.3 Which indicators were used to determine impact?: 

Canadians in all regions of the country engage and participate in a variety of professional artistic experiences:

  • Number and type of communities reached (by population size/urban, rural and remote)
  • Number and percentage of professional arts presenters that reach out to underserved communities

For more information, please see: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-PCH2-PCH-InstitutionalProfile/STAGING/texte-text/2014_Grouped_Arts_Evaluation_1453817656247_eng.pdf 

Have you taken or supported initiatives involving civil society in activities: 
Promote the objectives of the convention through awareness raising and other activities: 
Yes
Please explain how: 

Quebec would like to maintain a dialogue with civil society to promote the principles and objectives of the Convention in Quebec and abroad. The Government of Quebec financially supports the Canadian Coalition for Cultural Diversity (CCD), which is the main representative of civil society.Between 2012 and 2015, ad-hoc financial support was granted to more closely associate civil society with the work of Convention bodies, incite discussions on the impact of digital technologies on the evolution of the diversity of cultural expressions, and further highlight Quebec’s expertise with senior levels at UNESCO. This helped with:

  • the organization “Regards croisés sur le droit international de la culture : interactions et chevauchements entre les conventions relatives au patrimoine culturel immatériel et à la diversité des expressions culturelles” symposium in Québec City in October 2012;
  • Véronique Guèvremont’s piece of writing as an expert in international cultural law at the Université Laval’s Faculty of Law, “Réflexion préliminaire sur la mise en œuvre de la Convention sur la protection et la promotion de la diversité des expressions culturelles à l’ère numérique,” for the fourth session of the Conference of Parties in June 2013;
  • the Réseau international des juristes pour la diversité des expressions culturelles’ preparation of a second report entitled “La mise en œuvre de la Convention sur la protection et la promotion de la diversité des expressions culturelles à l’ère numérique : enjeux, actions prioritaires et recommandations;”
  • holding the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions ten years after: national and international perspectives in May 2015, organized by Université Laval’s Faculty of Law in collaboration with the CCD and the Institut national de la recherche scientifique.
Collect data and share and exchange information on measures adopted at local and international level: 
No
Please explain how: 
Provide spaces where ideas of civil societies can be heard and discussed while developing policies: 
Yes
Please explain how: 

In 2013, the CALQ created the Commission de la diversité culturelle. It consists of 18 members from various cultural communities that represent a variety of artistic disciplines. The Commission’s mandate is to formulate recommendations so that the CALQ can better meet the needs of creators and organizations from cultural communities. Reflection work is also focused on representing cultural communities within the CALQ’s staff as well as its committees and juries. In addition to cultural diversity, the CALQ also launched reflection work on the main artistic challenges, including interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity, generational transitions and promoting arts and literature. Many consultations were held, notably through ad-hoc committees made up of about 40 representatives from the community and by conducting a large-scale survey with anyone who applied for financial assistance from the CALQ.IN 2014, the SODEC also implemented a digital/interactive consultation commission. The commission is made up of members of civil society from various cultural businesses that correspond to their area of expertise. The purpose of the commission is to advice the SODEC about any issues submitted to it or to conduct any study required for its areas of expertise. The SODEC notably consults the commission about projects or changes to financial assistance programs.

Implement Operational Guidelines: 
No
Please explain how: 
Other: 
Please explain how: 

The Plan d’action sur le livre was launched in 2015, notably after consultations were held with stakeholders in the Quebec book sector in 2014.

Is Civil Society contributing to this report?: 
Yes
Name of the Organization(s): 
The Coalition for Cultural Diversity

Contribution from Civil Society

This section is to be completed with information provided by civil society: 
Has the civil society taken initiatives to: 
Promote the principle and the objectives of the Convention locally and internationally: 
Yes
Please explain how: 

The CCD is the only civil society organization dedicated to promoting the Convention with funding from its member associations and the Government of Quebec. It is involved in awareness activities through its research, public conferences, interventions in many seminars and ministerial meetings, its quarterly electronic newsletter that is sent to 7000 subscribers throughout the world and its social media accounts, where traffic has tripled in five years to reach 170,000 single visits every year. In May 2015, the site reached a record 13,000 single visits, which is 10 times more than the 1300 single visits the site received in March 2010.The CCD acts as the secretariat for the International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity (IFCCD), which has a presence in about 40 countries, two thirds of which are developing countries. It brought together coalition leaders at an international conference in 2012 in Bratislava, Slovakia, and in 2015 in Mons, Belgium in conjunction with the international Cultural exception facing the challenges of the digital world forum. The Bratislava conference helped to advance the Slovak Coalition’s advocacy efforts for a law on the status of the artist. The Mons conference was marked by the coalitions’ commitment to digital technologies.The Coalition played a central role in the advocacy efforts to have culture recognized as an objective of the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It was in this way that the IFCCD joined eight other large cultural networks for “The Future We Want includes Culture” campaign, which received the support of 2500 signing parties, including 1200 organizations from 120 countries. The collective shared its positions with the parties involved in negotiations for the new agenda, notably during the special thematic debate on culture and sustainable development in New York in May 2014. The Coalition also relayed the message to Canadian authorities during consultations led by the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Promote ratification of the Convention and its implementation by governements: 
Yes
Please explain how: 

The international movement of coalitions is among the member associations in about 40 countries, but it spread its actions over the year throughout all corners of the world by establishing direct collaboration with civil society representatives who are fighting for the Convention to be ratified in their countries, and sometimes even within the government. For example, the Coalition used funding from the Commonwealth Foundation in 2009 to organize the first Convention awareness forum for representatives from Asia-Pacific, as well as a second one in Sydney in 2010. The representative from Indonesia, who at the time was an employee of the Hivos Foundation, organized an awareness activity upon her return that helped to get Indonesia to ratify the Convention in 2012. Today, that same person is participating in the skills-building project on behalf of the Indonesian coalition for the arts (Kolasi Seni Indonesia) in preparation for Indonesia’s periodic four-year report on funding from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency. The Canadian Coalition supported groups from Mauritania, Turkey, Morocco, the Pacific Islands, the Balkans, etc. The Coalition also promotes the Convention as an annual speaker at the Université d’été de la Francophonie des Amériques.The Coalition also supports the four-year program to strengthen the governance of the cultural policy led by the IOF in four priority countries: Senegal, Gabon, Niger and Burkina Faso. This collaboration took the form of presentations on Quebec’s and Canada’s cultural policies during awareness seminars for elected officials (in partnership with the Assemblée parlementaire de la Francophonie), public servants and representatives of civil society.

Bring the concerns of citizens, associations and enterprises to public authorities, including vulnerable groups: 
No
Please explain how: 
Contribute to the achievement of greater transparency and accountability and accountability in the cultural governance: 
Yes
Please explain how: 

The Executive Director of the Canadian CCD also works as the Secretary General of the IFCCD and in that capacity acts on behalf of member associations in meetings with the Convention’s governing bodies. In that context, the Coalition contributed to the work of the Intergovernmental Committee to establish, the revise, operational directives about sections 9 and 19 on the preparation of periodic four-year reports. It fought for more consideration to be given to civil society’s perspectives, which now allows international associations to submit a thematic report to complement the State reports.The Coalition also advocated for more consideration to be given to the participation of civil society in the Intergovernmental Committee’s and the Conference of Parties’ debates, since it had noticed over the years that participation had dropped sharply, that the procedure did not foster a real dialogue or genuine consideration of civil society’s views, and that most of the work dealt with administrative issues rather than the actual contents of the Convention and its implementation. The Coalition therefore advocated for a revitalization of civil society’s participation, notably to take consideration of the digital age that is of great concern to all parties involved.The decisions made during the 9th Ordinary Session of the Intergovernmental Committee in December 2015 marked a change in attitude and opened the door to genuine and more dynamic participation from civil society. Hopefully the Convention Secretariat will have the financial and technical means for diverse participation from stakeholders to enrich our understanding of the successes and challenges of implementing the Convention throughout the world.

Monitor policy and programme implementation on measures to protect and promote diversity of cultural expression: 
Yes
Please explain how: 

The Coalition consists of about 30 associations that collectively represent 200,000 creators and 1200 businesses from all cultural industries. It was created in 1999 when multilateral negotiations at the World Trade Organization caused concerns about state’s ability to continue to support the diversity of national cultural creation through appropriate policies and measures. In recent years, member associations of the Coalition were again called upon for the negotiation of the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), for Canada’s participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement and to begin negotiations for the Plurilateral International Services Agreement. Member associations shared their positions in public consultations led by the Canadian government either in writing or by appearing before the Parliamentary committee responsible for reviewing those issues. But especially, however, they contributed to the new wording of the Canadian cultural exemption that is applied to relevant chapters rather than the entire agreement, as had previously been the case. Once the CETA and TPP texts were made public, the Coalition shared its analysis with a large public, including in the media. It also organized two seminars, the first in Montreal in September 2013 and the second in Québec City in May 2015, and invited Quebec and Canadian negotiators as well as legal experts with great reputations to debate the issue. Video clips can be accessed using the following links:Interview with Quebec’s chief negotiator, Pierre-Marc Johnson (video in French): http://cdc-ccd.org/Entrevue-avec-Pierre-Marc-Johnson?lang=enPanel with Gilbert Gagné, Solange Drouin, Patrick Muzzi and former premier Jean Charest (video in French): http://monde.ccdmd.qc.ca/ressource/?id=91036&demande=descPanel with Canada’s chief negotiator Steve Verheul, Quebec’s chief negotiator Pierre-Marc Johnson and legal experts Ivan Bernier and Peter Grant (video in French): http://monde.ccdmd.qc.ca/ressource/?id=100418&demande=desc  

Build capacities in domains linked to the Convention and carrying out data collection: 
No
Please explain how: 

In 2011, the CCD implemented an internship program that about 20 undergraduate and masters’ students from Canada and abroad participated in. The objective was both to develop succession and to gain a better understanding of the issues related to implementing the Convention through high-calibre analyses and research. The first students began the work that was continued by the next group, in such a way that over time it was possible to gain a better understanding of the following issues:

  • The particular treatment of culture in trade agreements
  • Civil society’s role in implementing the Convention
  • Funding cultural projects for sustainable
  • Governance of cultural policy that would be more inclusive of the diversity of cultural expressions
  • Culture’s contribution to the sustainable development of communities
  • Inter-sectoral issues of implementing the Convention in the digital age
  • Quebec and Canadian models of cultural policies
  • Copyright and the creator’s perspective
  • Cultural policies that support development, audience retention and youth participation

Thanks to knowledge sharing, the Coalition has become a centre of expertise that can offer original, up‑to-date content and reach new audiences interested by the practical aspects of implementing the Convention. The Coalition used this expertise as a basis to offer skills-building activities to member associations of the IFCCD in developing countries. It was also encouraged to share its expertise on numerous occasions in Canada and abroad.

Create innovative partnerships with the public and private sectors and with civil society of other regions of the worlds: 
Yes
Please explain how: 

The Coalition strengthened its partnership with the university research community to support its advocacy efforts based on actual observation. It met with Canadian universities known for their work on the Convention through a pan-Canadian series of conferences, the end of which coincided with the 10th anniversary of the Convention. The wording agreed upon provided for:

  1. Establishing a partnership with universities from various regions of the country;
  2. Proposing an issue relevant to the host university and local community related to the convention as a theme for the conference;
  3. Establishing succession by selecting organizers and panellists;
  4. Documenting the process by preparing summaries and video clips; and
  5. Fostering an exchange of perspectives between cultural, university and government sectors.

The series of conferences was launched in Montreal in September 2013 then continued on to Moncton, New Brunswick; Ottawa, Ontario; Vancouver, British Columbia; and Québec City. Two seminars are still scheduled for 2016 in Sudbury, Ontario and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Other than very productive discussions, the conference series helped to make the Convention more known and to make it relevant based on local interests and realities. It also made the Convention known outside of associations concentrated in large cities like Montreal and Toronto. The series received support from many sponsors, including the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, the Ville de Montréal, the Fernand-Dumont Research Chair from the Institut national de recherche scientifique (INRS), the MCC, Université Laval, Simon Fraser University, the Canadian Institute for Research on Linguistic Minorities (CIRLM), the Centre de la francophonie des Amériques, the IOF, the Government of Quebec’s Secrétariat aux Affaires intergouvernementales canadiennes and Canada’s Social Science and Humanities Research Council.

Challenges encountered or foreseen to implement the Convention: 
Challenge 1: Continue to mobilize civil society in Canada and abroad by ensuring the sustainability of the CCD; the current financial situation has become unsustainable.
Challenge 2: Remobilize member associations of the Coalition to update its mandate and actions on the national level that go beyond addressing culture in trade negotiations, now that the EU-Canada CETA and TPP have been signed.
Solutions found or envisaged: 
Solution 1: Reinstate funding from the Government of Canada that was cut in 2013 that allowed the Coalition to undertake actions to mobilize and stimulate civil society nationally and internationally.
Solution 2: Member associations of the Coalition will have to define what their complementary and added-value role will be, given the other objectives of the Convention and its implementation in the digital age.
Activities planned for next 4 years to implement the Convention: 
N/A (No input provided by CCD).
Supporting attachment provided by the Civil Society: 
Describe main results achieved in implementing the Convention: 

Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments, civil society, and cultural institutions have implemented diverse measures, building on a solid foundation and on initiatives protecting and promoting cultural expressions. Ongoing efforts to enable the production of Canadian cultural content ensure that high quality Canadian content is available and readily accessible by domestic and international audiences. Technological change has prompted adjustments to programs, new provincial strategies, and several modifications to the television regulation system, resulting in increased adaptability of the cultural sector. The introduction of a new provincial Status of the Artist legislation has ensured fair treatment for artists in areas under provincial jurisdiction.Canada has facilitated international cooperation through existing and new coproduction initiatives. Partnerships have also been an important result of international cultural cooperation, as exemplified by an innovative partnership to create a Canadian-branded online channel abroad. Measures such as facilitating temporary entry into Canada by foreign artists, and travel support programs for these artists have encouraged international exchanges of skills and experiences. Canada also included references to the Convention or its objectives in the preambles of concluded trade agreements, as well as specific exceptions for the treatment of cultural goods and services.Many measures have also resulted in a lasting promotion and appreciation of culture in communities across Canada, including Aboriginal and minority communities, through support for cultural participation and building facilities. International programs, such as the development programs in the Caribbean, are leading to increased economic development, and Agenda 21 in Quebec promotes the importance of culture in development strategies.Adapting to change has been key in implementing the Convention. The digital shift prompted new strategies supporting the cultural sector, as well as a plan from the Canadian public broadcaster to modernize

Challenges encountered or foreseen to implement the Convention : 

Challenges associated with implementing the Convention lie mostly with the pace at which new technologies change the parameters of traditional state interventions. The continued emergence of digital technologies enhances the diversity of cultural expressions, but also poses challenges to helping local or minority community cultural expressions to stand out in the abundance of content available worldwide.The consumption habits of cultural expressions and content, whether it be books, magazines, film, television, or arts, have changed drastically, forcing governments and cultural industries to adapt to new consumer needs.Another challenge is finding the means to facilitate the mobility of artists and other cultural professionals, particularly from developing countries. It is challenging to find ways of implementing article 16 of the Convention, related to the preferential treatment of cultural professionals. Canadian cultural officials are determined to facilitate cultural exchanges with developing countries. However, it can be difficult to grant preferential treatment to cultural professionals outside of trade agreements, and when it is contemplated in the context of trade negotiations, it is important to take a holistic approach between multiple government departments, including those responsible for culture, immigration and visas, public safety, foreign affairs, and international trade. Currently, preferential treatment is granted to artists from around the world on an ad hoc basis and through provisions included in various cultural frameworks.

Solutions found or envisaged to overcome those challenges: 

As Canada publishes its second quadrennial report, the Minister of Canadian Heritage has launched vast public consultations to better understand the challenges and opportunities for the cultural and creative industries brought on by technological transformations and the new digital environment in which they operate. These consultations will provide an opportunity to listen to and to learn from Canadians and to examine the Federal Government's current cultural policy toolkit. They will also help determine how best to assist the cultural sector in navigating these changes and seizing opportunities to contribute to Canada’s economic growth and innovation.In terms of solutions found for implementing article 16 of the Convention, Canada is currently able to meet part of its objective through support programs and various initiatives, most of which are undertaken by the Canada Council for the Arts. However, one must recognize that a greater coordination between government and cultural institutions such as the Canada Council will require to establish a more holistic approach to facilitating the mobility of artists and other cultural professionals.Ultimately, solutions to these challenges will be found through collaboration between all the players involved, from civil society, including creators and industry professionals, to governments and citizens alike. One such example of collaboration was the Discoverability Summit, hosted by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and the National Film Board in May 2016, which enabled participants coming from various cultural and media sectors across Canadian society to discuss strategies, tools and approaches to improve the discoverability of content.

Steps planned for the next 4 years: 

Over the course of the next four years, Canada will continue to reflect on the impact of emerging digital technologies on the diversity of cultural expressions and to review the role of government in helping its creative sector navigate these transformations, and to benefit from it, notably with respect to the international outreach of Canadian cultural content. As mentioned, the Minister of Canadian Heritage has launched vast public consultations to better understand the challenges and opportunities brought on by digital technologies with a view to examine the Federal Government's current cultural policy toolkit. These meetings allowed all Canadians to have the opportunity to contribute to the consultation process and to express their views. The involvement of civil society in the implementation of the Convention will also be a focus for the future, particularly in the provincial and territorial context.Canada will continue to explore ways to promote the objectives and principles of the Convention in other international fora, including through international trade agreements. Furthermore, Canada will search for innovative ways to use these international agreements to pursue cultural collaboration and cooperation with other countries. It will seek meaningful provisions, when appropriate, to enhance technical assistance and capacity building in the cultural sector with its trading partners, as well as encourage cultural exchange, knowledge-sharing, and cultural partnerships.

1. Economy and Finance: 
1.1. Total Flows of Cultural Goods and Services: 
1.1.a Cultural Goods: 
Total exports in cultural goods: 
USD: 
1015077787.78
Year: 
2010
Source: 
Statistics Canada (2010), International trade in culture goods, Canada, 2003 to 2010 : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/87-007-x/2011001/t001-eng.htm
Total imports in cultural goods: 
USD: 
2921701068.48
Year: 
2010
Source: 
Statistics Canada (2010), International trade in culture goods, Canada, 2003 to 2010 : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/87-007-x/2011001/t001-eng.htm
1.1.b Cultural Services: 
Total exports in cultural services: 
USD: 
2420044590.22
Year: 
2009
Source: 
Statistics Canada (2009), Canada's international trade in culture services: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/87-213-x/2012000/t106-eng.htm
Total imports in cultural services: 
USD: 
1983953939.59
Year: 
2009
Source: 
Statistics Canada (2009), Canada's international trade in culture services: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/87-213-x/2012000/t106-eng.htm
1.2 Contribution of cultural activities Gross Domestic Product: 
Total GDP: 
USD: 
16003540000.00
Year: 
2014
Source: 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Gross domestic product (GDP) [Table]. Retrieved from OECD Data database: https://data.oecd.org/gdp/gross-domestic-product-gdp.htm
USD: 
42 766 963 193.15
Year: 
2014
Source: 
Government of Canada (2016), Culture Satellite Account, Culture Gross Domestic Product and Jobs in Canada: http://canada.pch.gc.ca/DAMAssetPub/DAM-PCH2-PCH-InstitutionalProfile/STAGING/texte-text/cultural-capital-domain_1463508834022_eng.pdf
Which methodology was used to calculate the share of culture in total GDP?: 
1.3. Government expenditure on culture: 
Total government expenditure: 
USD: 
Year: 
Source: 
Share of culture in government expenditure: 
USD: 
Year: 
Source: 
2. Books: 
(a) Number of published titles: 
Num: 
14,218
Year: 
2014
Source: 
Statistics Canada, Survey of Book Publishers, 2014 http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160519/dq160519e-eng.htm
(b) Number of publishing companies: 
Total all companies: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
Small Size Companies: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
Medium Size: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
Large Size: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
(c) Bookshops and sales: 
Bookstore chains: 
Num: 
Sales, USD: 
Year: 
Source: 
Independent Book stores: 
Num: 
Sales, USD: 
Year: 
Source: 
Book stores in other retail: 
Num: 
Sales, USD: 
Year: 
Source: 
Online Retailers (labels): 
Num: 
Sales, USD: 
Year: 
Source: 
(d) Translation flows: 
Number of published translations: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
3. Music: 
(a) Production / Number of albums produced: 
Physical Format: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
Digital Format: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
Independent Format: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
Majors: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
(b) Sales / Total number of recorded music sales: 
Physical Format: 
Num: 
174,200,000
Year: 
2013
Source: 
Statistics Canada, Survey of Sound Recording and Music Publishing, 2013 http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150812/dq150812a-eng.htm
Digital Format: 
Num: 
150,300,000
Year: 
2013
Source: 
Statistics Canada, Survey of Sound Recording and Music Publishing, 2013 http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150812/dq150812a-eng.htm
4. Media: 
(a) Broadcasting audience and share: 
Year: 
Source: 
Programmes: 
(b) Broadcasting media organizations: 
Year: 
Source: 
Ownership: 
Public: 
Radio channels: 
Television channels: 
Both radio & television channels: 
Total: 
0
Private: 
Radio channels: 
Television channels: 
Both radio & television channels: 
Total: 
0
Community: 
Radio channels: 
Television channels: 
Both radio & television channels: 
Total: 
0
Not specified: 
Radio channels: 
Television channels: 
Both radio & television channels: 
Total: 
0
Total: 
Radio channels: 
0
Television channels: 
0
Both radio & television channels: 
0
Total: 
0
(c) Newspapers: 
Year: 
2015
Source: 
Newspapers Canada (www.newspaperscanada.ca)
Publishing format - printed: 
Free Only: 
Daily newspapers: 
13
Non-daily newspapers: 
543
Total: 
556
Paid Only: 
Daily newspapers: 
7
Non-daily newspapers: 
120
Total: 
127
Both Free and Paid: 
Daily newspapers: 
9
Non-daily newspapers: 
420
Total: 
429
Publishing format - both printed and online: 
Free Only: 
Daily newspapers: 
0
Non-daily newspapers: 
0
Total: 
0
Paid Only: 
Daily newspapers: 
2
Non-daily newspapers: 
0
Total: 
2
Both Free and Paid: 
Daily newspapers: 
72
Non-daily newspapers: 
0
Total: 
72
Total: 
Daily newspapers: 
103
Non-daily newspapers: 
1,083
Total: 
1,186
5. Connectivity, infrastructure, access: 
Number of mobile phone subscribers per 1000 inhabitants: 
Num: 
0
Year: 
Source: 
Number of households with Internet access at home: 
Num: 
0
Year: 
Source: 
Number of individuals using the Internet: 
Num: 
Year: 
Source: 
6. Cultural Participation: 
Percentage of people participating in cultural activities at least one time during the last 12 months: 
Activity (in %): 
Cinema: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Theatre: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Dance (including ballet): 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Live concert/musical performance: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Exhibition: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
TOTAL: 
Female: 
0.00
Male: 
0.00
Total: 
0.00
Is there any available data on the reasons for the non participation in cultural events?: 
Main reasons for non-participation (in %): 
Too Expensive: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Lack of Interest: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Lack of time: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Lack of information: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Too far away: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
Other: 
Female: 
Male: 
Total: 
0.00
7. Additional clarifications: 

Statistics Canada terminated two series that measured balance of trade for cultural services (2009) and cultural goods (2010). Though some of the data featured in this annex was also featured in Canada’s first quadrennial report in 2012, it is the most recent data available.In order to convert the stated monetary amounts from Canadian Dollars (CAD) to United States Dollars (USD), the exchange rate used was the average of the exchange rates in 2015, from January 1st to December 31st 2015, as published by the Bank of Canada.

Additional Annexes (if any): 
Title: 
Ms
First Name: 
Nathalie
Family Name: 
Théberge
Organization: 
Canadian Heritage Department
Position: 
Directrice Générale, Direction générale de la Politique du droit d'auteur et du Commerce International