IFCD Project Proposal

Project Title
Engaging Cobuqua Youth to Advance Cobuqua First Nation Rights and Heritage in South Africa's Eastern Cape

Project ID: 2016 - 7656

Country: South Africa

Date of submission: 14/6/2016

Name of applicant
Khulumani Support Group

Type of applicant
NGO

Amount requested in USD
70 450.00

Beneficiary Countries

Status

Submitted

Non pre-selected

Final Score
Expert 1 Expert 2 Total
0 0 0
Funds Allocated in USD
-

Engaging Cobuqua Youth to Advance Cobuqua First Nation Rights and Heritage in South Africa's Eastern Cape

Title of project: 
Engaging Cobuqua Youth to Advance Cobuqua First Nation Rights and Heritage in South Africa's Eastern Cape
Amount requested in US$: 
70450.00
Name of applicant: 
Khulumani Support Group
Type of applicant: 
NGO
Country: 
South Africa
Beneficiary country(ies): 
4.1 Length of the project: 
3/4/2017 to 30/3/2018
Short-term objectives of the project: 
The short-term objectives are to develop skills amongst 125 young people from indigenous Cobuqua communities in 5 areas of the Eastern Cape to produce and collate oral histories from storytelling sessions and visual art from facilitated artmaking sessions with Cobuqua people towards restoring the pride and dignity of the Cobuqua people. The produces will be made accessible through a website and other social media while the art works will be curated into a travelling exhibition that can travel to schools and museums across the Eastern Cape to address the lack of awareness of the histories of indigenous people in South Africa and to contribute to restoring their dignity and pride as people in their own right. Attention will be paid to trying to secure a gender balance in the participation of the young people in the project.
Date: 
23/4/2016
Full Name of the representative of the applicant as Signature: 
Marjorie Dorothea Jobson
4.2 Brief summary of the project: 
The project will engage 25 youth members of each of the five main Cobuqua communities, following their forced relocation from their ancestral along the Port St Johns coastline to Mthatha, Buffalo City, Matatiele, Aliwal North and Queenstown in the Eastern Cape. The youth will be trained in the skills of storytelling, artmaking and videodocumentation of the histories, heritage and indigenous knowledge of their own people towards facilitating recognition of the Cobuqua people and their unique histories and towards empowering the Cobuqua people to advocate for the restoration of their rights, an end to their experiences of discrimination and the promotion of their capacities to participate in all decision-making forums where their issues are discussed. The project team will start by re-establishing contact with the around 200 participants who assembled in the Port St Johns Town Hall to meet with officials from the Commission for Land Restitution and from the Department of Rural Development to engage these officials on the delays in the adjudication of their claim for the restitution of their ancestral land. The project provides for the Project Officer and the Project Researcher to visit each of the five locations to conduct training of 25 young people at each site in the skills of listening, recording histories and documenting these histories to inform ongoing advocacy efforts. The information collated will be reviewed and prepared for digitization and inclusion on a dedicated website and on Facebook along with the institution of a blog to be updated twice a month. The project will conclude with a community 'indaba' at Port St Johns involving government officials while the work is exhibited in the Port St Johns Town Hall
Long-term objectives of the project: 
The long-term objectives are to facilitate capacities for active political, social, cultural and economic engagement by Cobuqua people within the communities in which they reside towards their leading actions to secure their recognition and their equal right to land, health care, education and economic opportunities - all of which have largely continued to exclude them post the country's political transition. The project will produce an action plan to address the specific human rights concerns of the Cobuqua people including a plan to take forward their land claim and the reclaiming of their identity and history. The project will result in the development of a formal response to the Traditional Affairs Bill and will build knowledge of the provisions for the promotion of the human rights of indigenous people in South Africa, in Africa and at the United Nations where four mechanisms have been put in place. The project will advance the struggle of the Cobuqua for recognition of their first nation status and will advance their access to remedies provided for in United Nations and African Commission provisions for indigenous peoples.
Title: 
Ms
Family name: 
Jobson
4.3 Local context and complementarity of the project with other regional, national and local policies/ measures/ programmes/ projects: 
The specific needs, priorities and challenges of the Cobuqua people (as members of the Cape Khoi) are their need for interventions to address their powerlessness to engage in forums where issues affecting them are discussed. Much of this is self-exclusion on grounds of a lack of self-confidence based on their having had very limited access to education. This resulted from the lifestyle of the Cobuqua people whose livelihoods depended mainly on fishing and on scavenging from rocks along the shoreline. There is a need to construct specific spaces where the Cobuqua people come together to reclaim their histories and learn skills for effective democratic citizenship towards ending their exclusion and marginalisation. The Cobuqua people presently have no representation on the Khoisan National Council. Their land claim application has not received the attention of the relevant authorities and the 2014 amendment of the Restitution of Land Rights Amendment Act provides opportunities for community members to apply citizenship skills in taking forward their land claim following their dispossession of their land in 1976 when then Chief Minister Kaizer Matanzima was consolidating the self-governing homeland of the Transkei for Xhosa people. This dispossession and the dismissal of the customary rights to land and other natural resources of the Cobuqua people has led to the undermining of the knowledge systems through which the Cobuqua sustained their lives over centuries. The areas in which the Cobuqua now live between East London and Queenstown came under colonial rule during the time f the frontier wars. The original assault on the humanity of the Cobuqua people was doubly compounded by there realities and the lack of access to land has profoundly affected the capacity of the Cobuqua to organize and mobilize to end their marginalisation. Additional challenges are the exclusion of most of the Cobuqua people from representation on the local councils of the towns where they now live. The African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights research into the status of the rights of indigenous peoples in Africa found that “indigenous peoples and communities are, to a large extent, discriminated against by mainstream populations and looked down upon as backward peoples. Many stereotypes prevail that describe them as “backward”, “uncivilized”, “primitive” and “uncultured” and as an embarrassment to modern African states. Such negative stereotyping legitimizes official discrimination, marginalization, subjugation, exclusion and dispossession of indigenous peoples by government institutions and dominant groups.” The report also found that many indigenous people have been forced to assimilate into local communities, having had to deny their ancestry their cultural identities.
Under apartheid, indigenous peoples were dispossessed of their land and their communities and cultures were deliberately destroyed while they were forced to assimilate into the "Coloured community". Indigenous peoples are still not officially recognized and official statistics do not reflect their presence in South Africa. The 1996 Constitution, however, includes a reference to “Khoe and San” people. The Khoisan historically comprise five main groupings, namely San, Griqua, Nama, Koranna and the Cape Khoi. The South African government has not ratified ILO Convention No. 169 concerning Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries (1989). The Khoisan people continue to struggle for the protection of their key collective and human rights as distinct ethnic communities as stipulated by standards set out by the United Nations about indigenous peoples. The Cobuqua along with other Khoisan groups self-identify as first peoples of South Africa on grounds that they inhabited South Africa prior to the arrival of Europeans and other black groupings. They also hold the oldest known human DNA. The communities identify with the international movement of some 370 million indigenous people advocating for their rights across the world. The communities were stigmatized under apartheid. UN Special Rapporteur Rodolfo Stavenhagen recommended to the South African government “that indigenous communities be recognized as such constitutionally and that the legal institutions maintaining the stigma of their classification as “Coloureds” by the apartheid regime be removed. The two main challenges the Khoisan experience today in South Africa, are the lack of visibility as a people from within the current constitutional dispensation and the continuing perception of their identity as being “Coloured”. These challenges affect Khoisan indigenous institutions and access to land and respect for their heritage and languages. Together the consequence is that most indigenous people survive in precarious socioeconomic conditions. There are moves to accommodate the Khoisan through the provisions of traditional leadership and customary law provided for in Chapter 12 of the 1996 Constitution. The Khoisan wish for their differences to be recognized rather than being subsumed under the umbrella of an imposed traditional leadership that owns no territory. Lack of restitution of land to the Khoisan remains a burning issue. The 2005 report of the UN Special Rapporteur describes the lack of access to land as the greatest impediment to the development of the Khoisan and their economic development and intergenerational cultural survival. The Khoisan people are amongst the poorest population groups in South Africa with an accompanying high prevalence of ill health and risk behaviours.
Given name: 
Marjorie
Position: 
National Director
Address: 
Suite 227 2nd Floor Khotso House, 62 Marshall Street, Marshalltown
Postcode: 
2107
Promotion of gender equality: 
Yes
Town: 
Johannesburg
Please explain: 
Care will be taken to try to secure a 50% participation of each gender of youth facilitators and workshop participants.
Empowerment of youth: 
Yes
Country: 
South Africa
Telephone: 
+27 82 268 0223
Please explain: 
The project is based on an initial exploratory visit to all five communities conducted by Mr Wade and Dr Jobson in which the greatest need expressed was by young people wanting to recover their histories and identities. For the reason the training will be of young people to lead the project activities in their communities.
Promotion of South-South/North-South-South cooperation: 
Yes
Email: 
marje@khulumani.net
Please explain: 
The project will produce materials that will be available for exhibition in the countries of Europe where a Khulumani ArtVision project produced by widows of the Marikana Massacre is presently on exhibition at the Institute of Fine Art in Vienna, Austria. Khulumani work with communities has also been translated into German for use in German schools. These experiences will inform the development of products for use in schools in the north.
Date of establishment of entity / organization: 
30/3/2000
Participation of various social groups in the areas of intervention of the IFCD: 
Yes
Name: 
Dr Marjorie Jobson
Responsibility in the activities of the project: 
Project Oversight, Monitoring and Evaluation
Skills/background/qualifications: 
Physician, Facilitator of community-based empowerment processes
Name: 
Mr Joseph Wade
Responsibility in the activities of the project: 
Project Officerformer
Skills/background/qualifications: 
Member and trusted main organizer of the dispersed Cobuqua community, former local government councillor
Name: 
Mr Pasika Nontshiza
Responsibility in the activities of the project: 
Researcher and oral historian
Skills/background/qualifications: 
Project management, paralegal service provider, land restitution activist
Name: 
Ms Asathi Magwentshu
Responsibility in the activities of the project: 
Accountant
Skills/background/qualifications: 
Finance Administration
Name: 
Ms Nomarussia Bonase
Responsibility in the activities of the project: 
ArtVision Process Facilitator
Skills/background/qualifications: 
Graduate of Training for Transformation, former union organizer, skilled group facilitator
Please explain: 
The stage of sharing the products in public spaces such as at Constitution Hill and across Eastern Cape museums will allow for the materials to inform other social groups and for platforms to be created for the producers of the work to explain what the processes have meant to them in reclaiming their pride and dignity as a basis for ongoing advocacy.
Place of establishment of entity/organization: 
Johannesburg
Main mission of applicant: 
To facilitate redress for communities affected by historical injustice to restore their dignity and to gain recognition as a basis for asserting constitutional rights
Result: 
RESULT 1
Description: 
RESULT 1: Teams of young Cobuqua members in each of five communities receive skills for producing local histories and narratives accompanied by art works and videos to contribute to travelling exhibitions, short films and short books that serve to educate and make people aware of the proud histories and identities of the Cobuqua as first nation peoples and of the specific challenges they face as a result of adverse social, cultural, political and economic conditions and circumstances that can be traced back to their near-elimination by colonialists and their attempted forced assimilation into the "Coloured" community.
Planned activity: 
Activity: 
ACTIVITY 1.1
Description: 
Training takes place for 25 participants in each identified site over 3 days - Mthatha, Aliwal North, Matatiele, Buffalo City and Mthatha - with half the trainees developing skills in listening and documenting stories and the other half being involved in the video and art production.
Implementation Schedule: 
8/5/2017 to 29/9/2017
What indicator(s) disaggregated by gender are to be used to measure the achievement of the expected result? : 
Each oral history trainee produces stories from ten elders of their community including both men and women with a focus on hearing equal numbers of men and women. The visual art trainee facilitators work in groups of three to co-facilitate two day workshops for up to nine local residents to produce visual artworks that tell their stories in images (rather than words)
What are the means of verification of this indicator(s)? : 
The names of the 31 storytelling facilitators and the 31 art and video facilitators are recorded. The collation of ten stories from each of the 31 storytelling facilitators are available in a collected volume of stories of the Cobuqua (based on Khulumani's experience in producing these books) 15 short films are available along with 15 exhibitions of artworks for display in museums and schools.
Location(s): 
Mthatha, Aliwal North, Matatiele, Queenstown and Buffalo City
Direct Beneficiaries: 
125 youth facilitators with 60 becoming competent in recording oral histories and 30 being involved in facilitating art and narrative workshops while the remaining 30 produce short films
Indirect Beneficaries: 
All the members of the Cobuqua community; the members of the Khoisan Traditional Council; the residents of the towns where the Cobuqua activities are held who visit the exhibition and see the short films; all the visitors to the website that is made available and officials in the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and their associates involved in traditional leadership matters.
Result: 
RESULT 2
Description: 
RESULT 2: The sharing of the outputs generated by the trained youth facilitators towards enhancing recognition of the Cobuqua people and their history as a step towards their full and equal recognition.
Planned activity: 
Activity: 
ACTIVITY 2.1
Description: 
The documented oral histories are compiled into small books illustrated with photographs and printed for launching at the annual Eastern Cape Oral History Conference that takes place in October each year.
Implementation Schedule: 
21/8/2017 to 3/11/2017
What indicator(s) disaggregated by gender are to be used to measure the achievement of the expected result? : 
Each area produces a collated volume of up to 30 local stories of Cobuqua people including photographs.
What are the means of verification of this indicator(s)? : 
The five booklets are available and are launched at the 2018 Eastern Cape Oral History Conference
Location(s): 
The launch takes place in King Williams Town at the Steve Biko Museum.
Direct Beneficiaries: 
The people who are introduced to the stories of the Cobuqua people including officials in government at national and local level towards ensuring their full recognition of the equal rights of the Cobuqua people.
Indirect Beneficaries: 
The wider society in South Africa who know little about the lives and challenges of people of indigenous ancestry.
Main activities of applicant: 
To facilitate processes of "speaking out" towards recognition and the capacity to participate in forums where issues are debated; To research and document the histories, experiences and knowledge of marginalised communities; To build capacity through processes of trauma-informed community empowerment; and To provide support for processes of healing, rehabilitation and reconciliation.
Sustainability: 

Sustainability in projects should be considered in relation to ongoing results, effects and outcomes of the project. Sustainability is about:

  1. Building relationships on an on-going basis – through communication, building trust, reciprocity and showing commitment;
  2. Developing diverse funding sources – including grants, fees for services, volunteers, donations, active fundraising campaigns, etc.;
  3. Being flexible – capacity to accommodate change by incorporating on-going evaluation into project evaluation.
What measures/steps will you put in place to ensure that your project long-term objectives can be met? : 
The project will provide a powerful means of recognising the Cobuqua people as an indigenous community that contributes to the cultural diversity of the country and will enable a reclaiming of the pride of the Cobuqua people. The project will also produce outputs that will be available for sale.
What measures/steps will you take to follow up with the beneficiaries of the project after its completion?: 
The beneficiaries are community members connected to the advocacy work of Khulumani for redress for historical injustices. The website will serve as the vehicle for ongoing communication and information sharing, The project Officer will continue his efforts as a traditional leader who cares deeply about his people and the problems they face.
Total funding requested from the IFCD (not exceeding US$ 100,000): 
$0.00
Total co/self-funding income: 
$0.00
Total project cost: 
Source: 
Source: 
9.1 Previous funding from the IFCD: 
9.2 Previous funding from UNESCO for similar or related projects (either from UNESCO Headquarters, a Field Office or an Institute) to implement project(s) similar to or related to the project that you are currently proposing: 
Are you currently applying for other UNESCO funds?: 
Please provide details: 
Outcome 1: A policy environment that promotes the diversity of cultural expressions is created through targeting structural change. : 
[  ] Cross-sectoral cooperation in policy making and implementation demonstrated;
[  ] The role of civil society in policy making and implementation strengthened;
[  ] Processes and mechanisms of policy implementation and review strengthened.
Outcome 2: The value and opportunities that the cultural and creative industries offer in the achievement of sustainable development are clearly demonstrated.: 
[  ] Innovation and new business models applied to cultural entrepreneurship;
[  ] Access to local, national or international markets for cultural goods improved;
[x] Participation and collaboration in cultural and creative industries widened to previously excluded individuals and social groups.
Outcome 3: Contributions are made to sustainable capacity development in the cultural sector at institutional, organisational and individual levels.: 
[x] National and international networks and communities of practice facilitated, with a focus on North-South-South cooperation;
[  ] Capacity development needs relating to cultural value chain assessed and mapped;
[  ] Capacity development needs relating to cultural value chain addressed at appropriate levels.
Please check the two boxes below:: 
Commit to respect the provisions of paragraph 25 of the Guidelines.
Certify that all information contained in this application is truthful. I also certify that any documents provided in support of my application are authentic and accurate.
Description: 
Non Profit Registration Certificate
Category: 
Official Document proving your legal status
Language of Document: 
English

3.1 Please list all paid contractors, subcontractors, consultants and/or experts who will participate in the implementation of the activities proposed who are not employed by your institution/organization.

Outcome 1: A policy environment that promotes the diversity of cultural expressions is created through targeting structural change.: 
[  ] Expected Result 1.1 Cross-sectoral cooperation in policy making and implementation demonstrated;
[  ] ER 1.2 The role of civil society in policy making and implementation strengthened;
[  ] ER 1.3 Processes and mechanisms of policy implementation and review strengthened.
Contractor or partner: 
Name: 
Roger Layton and Associates
Professional affiliation: 
Digitisation of heritage documents
Nationality: 
South Africa
Skills/background/qualifications: 
Founder of the ETHER (Eternal Heritage) Initiative, former partner in the Voices of Boipatong Heritage Project
Responsibility in the activities of the project: 
Digitization of the oral histories and the videos and photographs Setting up of the Voices of the Cobuqua website
Outcome 2: The value and opportunities that the cultural and creative industries offer in the achievement of sustainable development are clearly demonstrated.: 
[  ] ER 2.1 Innovation and new business models applied to cultural entrepreneurship;
[  ] ER 2.2 Access to local, national or international markets for cultural goods improved;
[  ] ER 2.3 Participation and collaboration in cultural and creative industries widened to previously excluded individuals and social groups.

3.2 Please list all non-paid partners involved in the project's implementation. Please indicate whether the partner is a public authority/institution, an NGO or a private company.

Outcome 3: Contributions are made to sustainable capacity development in the cultural sector at institutional, organizational and individual levels.: 
[  ] ER 3.1 National and international networks and communities of practice facilitated, with a focus on North-South-South cooperation;
[  ] ER 3.2 Capacity development needs relating to cultural value chain assessed and mapped;
[  ] ER 3.3 Capacity development needs relating to cultural value chain addressed at appropriate levels.
Project expected results and activities: 
Non-paid partner: 
Name: 
National Heritage Council
Type of Institution: 
Public institution
Country: 
South Africa
Role in project: 
Advisory role in relation to processes affecting First Nation people in South Africa in association with the National Department of Arts and Culture and the South African Heritage Resources Agency
Type of ExpenditureDescriptionRelated Activity/iesCost for Unit (USD)Unit (per day, per person, per item, ...)Number of UnitsTotal Cost (USD)Amount co/self funded (USD)Amount funded by IFCD (USD)
Salaries / fees
Project StaffProject Officer & ResearcherACTIVITY 1.11111.52822,223.002,223.000.00x
Contractor/Subcontractor/ConsultantDigitising heritageACTIVITY 2.1417417.00208,340.008,340.000.00x
Administrative/SupportFinance and Accounting servicesAll the activities243243.004811,664.0011,664.000.00x
Subtotal22,227.0022,227.000.00
% of the Grand Total31.51%31.51%0.00%
Travel and per diem
Land TransportationTravel to sites of implementationACTIVITY 1.15231276,604.006,604.000.00x
Subtotal6,604.006,604.000.00
% of the Grand Total9.36%9.36%0.00%
Equipment and supplies
Equipment (total based on pro forma invoice enclosed with the application)Tape recorder & video recorderACTIVITY 2.1111.167.5101,111.601,111.600.00x
OtherOffice equipment for Mthatha OfficeACTIVITY 1.11030.44.311,030.401,030.400.00x
Subtotal2,142.002,142.000.00
% of the Grand Total3.04%3.04%0.00%
Communication
Publications (editing, design, printing, etc.)Books ACTIVITY 2.14203001,200.001,200.000.00x
Subtotal1,200.001,200.000.00
% of the Grand Total1.70%1.70%0.00%
Other costs and services
Rent of Conferences/ Seminar RoomsVenue hire & cateringACTIVITY 1.1311.232710,137.0010,137.000.00x
EvaluationM & E ServicesACTIVITY 2.1174174.00366,264.006,264.000.00x
Rent of Conferences/ Seminar RoomsIndaba for 22 All the activities5252.0021010,920.0010,920.000.00x
Subtotal27,321.0027,321.000.00
% of the Grand Total38.73%38.73%0.00%
Overhead
Rent of office spaceOfficer overheadsACTIVITY 2.1920.53.801211,046.0011,046.000.00x
Subtotal11,046.0011,046.000.00
% of the Grand Total15.66%15.66%0.00%
Grand Total70,540.0070,540.000.00
Percentage of Grand Total100.00%0.00%
Subtitle: 
Date: 
Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Full Name of the representative of the National Commission as Signature: 
Carlton Mukwevho